Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

FrogPrincesse

"Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails"

Recommended Posts

Sforzando (Eryn Reece), a smoky and spicy Manhattan variation with Rittenhouse rye, Del Maguey Chichicapa mezcal (Vida mezcal), Benedictine, Dolin dry vermouth, Bittermens xocolatl mole bitters (The Bitter Truth for Bittermens).

 

15106162649_9cee927991_z.jpg\

 

It's the dry version of Stephen Cole's Racketeer (although that one guilds the lily by adding a touch of yellow Chartreuse, a spray of Laphroaig, and Peychaud's bitters).

I tried this one, also with Vida. 

The first sip boosted my confidence in my growing belief that smoky mezcals are just not for me.

But the second and subsequent sips I enjoyed without reservation. 

I've had a similar experience with Fernet-heavy drinks--the initial, unenjoyable sip forces an adjustment on my sense of taste, and then I really like the drink from there on out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stumbled across the Martica last night (Cognac, Appleton, Antica formula, maraschino liqueur, Angostura).

 

Delicious.  A really exotic flavour I can't describe.  The Appleton (I used 12 rather than the recipe's VX) was certainly there, but everything just blended into a fascinating whole.

 

Every time I think I must have picked all the really good ones out of the book, another one like this pops up.  Highly recommended.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stumbled across the Martica last night (Cognac, Appleton, Antica formula, maraschino liqueur, Angostura).

 

Delicious.  A really exotic flavour I can't describe.  The Appleton (I used 12 rather than the recipe's VX) was certainly there, but everything just blended into a fascinating whole.

 

Every time I think I must have picked all the really good ones out of the book, another one like this pops up.  Highly recommended.

 

I've returned the book to the library.  Can you list the recipe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how well a nice solid agave forward reposado tequila might work in the Coin Toss. Might have to give that a try. I think the yellow chartreuse would play well with it. The Kah 110 proof reposado might be just the thing.

Thus inspired, tonight's drink is a Coin Toss with Revolucion Anejo. Oh yes!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've returned the book to the library.  Can you list the recipe?

 

Kindred now can.  And I also discover there's a Chocolate Martica, made my upping the Carpano a bit and subbing mole bitters for the Angostura.  Have to try that too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kindred now can.  And I also discover there's a Chocolate Martica, made my upping the Carpano a bit and subbing mole bitters for the Angostura.  Have to try that too.

 

Enjoying a Martica as we speak.  Thanks, Leslie!

 

 

Edit:  I substituted PF 1840 and Appleton 12.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rightly so (mine was also Appleton 12).

The Chocolate Martica, while very good, isn't quite up to the original, to our taste. But one must try both to decide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I look forward to your report! I am stuck at a party full of heathen vodka drinkers tonight and unless I bring them with me I won't have the necessary ingredients to whip one up.

Well, I was going to make one last night, but realized to my great horror that I was out of aged tequila...

 

So I ended up making the Coin Toss with Monkey Shoulder blended malt scotch whisky. It was very nice. Much less rich than the Rittenhouse version; super interesting still.

 

16148403684_a6444f8d22_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried this one, also with Vida. 

The first sip boosted my confidence in my growing belief that smoky mezcals are just not for me.

But the second and subsequent sips I enjoyed without reservation. 

I've had a similar experience with Fernet-heavy drinks--the initial, unenjoyable sip forces an adjustment on my sense of taste, and then I really like the drink from there on out.

Soon you will find yourself craving mezcal or Fernet for no particular reason...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I was going to make one last night, but realized to my great horror that I was out of aged tequila...

 

So I ended up making the Coin Toss with Monkey Shoulder blended malt scotch whisky. It was very nice. Much less rich than the Rittenhouse version; super interesting still.

 

 

 

Yes, we've enjoyed Monkey Shoulder Coin Tosses too.  But the anejo tequila one is definitely worth a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, we've enjoyed Monkey Shoulder Coin Tosses too.  But the anejo tequila one is definitely worth a try.

I hear you. But I was too tired to go to the store to buy tequila last night.

 

Last night I tried Brian Miller's Bay City Roller with Monkey Shoulder scotch, Averna, simple syrup, orange twist. Simple yet impactful.

 

16594924199_06a1522aef_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cynartown (Phil Ward) with Beefeater London dry gin, Dolin sweet vermouth, Cynar, brandied cherry. This one has ratios similar to a Martinez (2 / 0.75 / 0.25) with Cynar replacing the maraschino liqueur.

 

The ingredients are the same as the Cin Cyn (minus the orange bitters), but the Cynartown is lighter on the Cynar.

 

16065235077_0cfb271479_z.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After the Bay City Roller, another one from the Sazerac variation section, Joaquín Simó's Latin Quarter

Vieux Pontarlier absinthe (St. George absinthe), Zacapa 23 rum (Havana Club añejo 7), cane sugar syrup (sirop de canne JM), house Peychaud's bitters (Peychaud's), Angostura bitters, Bittermens xocolatl mole bitters. A rum Sazerac which is just brilliant.

 

16582687627_bd44cc7daa_z.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FP, if you're working your way through the Sazerac section, don't miss the Alembic.  We had it a couple of nights ago.  Very simple but definitely tasty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dolly Dagger (Alex Day) with Smith & Cross Jamaican rum, Williams & Humbert dry sack medium sherry, lime juice, vanilla syrup. That one essentially tempered down the Smith & Cross with a load of sherry and a touch of vanilla. I think it's just a shame because S&C should never be tamed, and although the cocktail was well balanced, I could not get used to a swizzle that tasted like wine.

 

 

16641691470_d5dd46af09_z.jpg
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have the Lustau East India Solera sherry that the book calls for. I don't know if I can get it locally: my go-to place for booze stocks a few other Lustau products but not the Solera. A bit of research told me that it's a blend of oloroso and PX. I didn't have any oloroso on hand but I had some PX. I knew it'd be a different drink but I figured, hey, why not? I can see it working, I guess, but I'm tempted to cut the PX with something that'd inject the savoury note of oloroso. This just comes out super choclately, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. 

 

Are there any other sherries that blend oloroso and PX in the one bottle? I don't drink enough sherry to justify having a lot on hand.

 

EDIT

Is the stuff that's marketed as 'cream sherry' roughly similar to the East India solera?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Howlin' at the Moon: a genever-based Old Fashioned jacked with a little creme de cacao. I think you'd like this one, haresfur.

 

Hadley's Tears: a two spirit base of Bols and Appleton V/X. Absinthe and Ristretto in supporting roles. It's interesting. I like it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arrack Strap (Brad Farran) with Van Oosten baravia arrack, Cruzan black strap rum,  Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Campari, demerara syrup, xocolatl & orange bitters.

 

Batavia arrack as the base - this is genius. Also I think it's my favorite use of black strap in a cocktail.

 

17294727145_ef4c423f25_z.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My pick for Cinco de Mayo earlier this week was Alex Day's Alta California with Siembra azul blanco tequila (Siete Leguas blanco tequila), Dolin white vermouth, yellow Chartreuse, cinnamon bark syrup (homemade). Crisp and bright like a peppery tequila martini.

 

17383864532_54e14f801c_z.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One, One, One (Thomas Waugh) with Krogstad aquavit, Beefeater gin, Dolin white vermouth, Regan's orange bitters (no garnish).

A play on the Martini, with the caraway and anise notes from the aquavit shining through.

 

18537176969_be7952b1ce_z.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martini with Sipsmith London dry gin (not one of their recommended gins, but I like it in Martinis), Dolin dry vermouth, Death & Co orange bitters mix (aka Regan/Fee/Angostura orange), lemon twist, Death & Co ratios.

 

18633136679_8b9f445dca_z.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martica (Phil Ward) with Hine H cognac (Pierre Ferrand 1840), Appleton Eastate V/X Jamaican rum (Appleton 12), Carpano Antica sweet vermouth (Cocchi vermouth di Torino), Luxardo maraschino liqueur, Angostura bitters.

 

Rich and delicious.

 

20534155538_91ef307f84_z.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at Death & Co last week, my date and I split 4 cocktails. Flor de Jerez was the standout, I'll definitely be making it at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got my hands on some Amontadiilo sherry and tried out the Flor De Jerez. Was quite lovely, even though i used Appleton 12 rather than the Reserve called for, it doesnt seem to be available locally. It's quite raisin-y.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
    • By Mullinix18
      I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you. 
    • By Hideo Sakai
      Any idea what is the best book for me? I am starting to love cooking, I just got great recipe of sauces from this book "Restaurant Style Barbecue Sauce Recipes" all I need is the proper technique for grilling. Thanks
    • By Tuber magnatum
      In the post below, there was a link to what looks to be a terrific book on beef cutting,  "The Art of Beef Cutting: A Meat Professional's Guide to Butchering and Merchandising".

      Reading some of the reviews on Amazon, I came across this video which I thought extremely educational, particularly seeing as I just bought a mixed 1/4 Wagyu carcass and wanted to learn more about the cuts I received , and I thought others might be interested.  Its long, but I found it much easier to understand than just looking at photos. Also referenced was the free pdf/webpage CFIA MEAT CUTS MANUAL.
       
       
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×