Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chocolates with that backroom finish


Mette
 Share

Recommended Posts

Kerry, I wanted to thank you again for the reminder that the rejects can be re-purposed. Management hadn't eaten too many of the cracked ones I had left in the office, so I took them back and melted them down with a little cream and another splash of bourbon. That plus a the extra filling I had saved ended up being the perfect amount to fill two molds of 32. All came out perfect, shiny, and sell-able! As with so many aspects of cooking, it's not about never making mistakes, it's about knowing how to fix them. Thanks! :wub:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

6908933068_4b465a43df_z.jpg

Look nice don't they - took a picture just before I binned them. Only chocolate that I've made that Anna has actually spit out! Hopefully next iteration will be better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

6961702434_382e9b50af_z.jpg

Check out the chocolate on the right - it's my leftover that was supposedly in temper - I scraped out the stuff in the glass cup measure (that's on the bottom) then dumped the remainder of the stuff from the piping bag on top of it. Weirdly the chocolate from the piping bag that I used to decorate the pieces of licorice was fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Sooo, y'know how sometimes you have a nice cocoa butter swirl in your molds that seems to be in temper, but when you unmold the finished pieces half of them have spots where the color has flaked off? Do we know exactly why that happens? Cocoa butter too hot, too cold, too much agitation? Agitating when semi-set because you just can't leave well enough alone?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

There always seems to be a piece or two that gets in the way of the mold when I'm banging the last few stuck ones out....also known as samples for the chef :laugh:

IMG_0636.jpg

Lol, I do that too! Usually with me, it's just nicks, but I always catch more than just one under the mold.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There always seems to be a piece or two that gets in the way of the mold when I'm banging the last few stuck ones out....also known as samples for the chef :laugh:

IMG_0636.jpg

I think we've all had that happen. I'm always a bit saddened when a piece suicides by dropping out of the mold just as I'm starting my down stroke to bang it out.

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think we've all had that happen. I'm always a bit saddened when a piece suicides by dropping out of the mold just as I'm starting my down stroke to bang it out.

I've developed something of a neuroses about it, in fact: I've fallen into a stupidly complicated sequence of unmolding steps to ensure that it happens as seldom as possible.

  • Like 1

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think we've all had that happen. I'm always a bit saddened when a piece suicides by dropping out of the mold just as I'm starting my down stroke to bang it out.

Bon bon suicides, so sad :sad:

I've developed something of a neuroses about it, in fact: I've fallen into a stupidly complicated sequence of unmolding steps to ensure that it happens as seldom as possible.

Do tell.... who doesn't love neurotic overly complicated confectionery? But I guess a sheet pan or something would save some losses...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

DSCN0089.jpg

The infamous Greweling Buckwheat Dog Turds! A classic.

Failure to table the ganache enough, failure to produce 25mm discs for the bottoms (these are more like 35 mm - so my ganache amounts are wrong) and failure to pipe evenly - which is pretty difficult when you are piping something this liquid.

Right at the bottom of the upslope on the learning curve!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 9 months later...

These ones did not even make it to the backroom - firmly stuck blackcurrant paté de fruit

(hint - make sure you use silicone paper to pour the PdF)

attachicon.gifPDF.jpg

Oops. Is that madpapir?

Oops, indeed.....Madpapir (greaseproof sandwich wrapping paper) is NOT the same as silicone paper....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Here's my latest back room finish lovely delight. I was experimenting on whether I could have my transfer sheet on the sheet pan and just slide the chocolate onto the transfer sheet after dipping to save time from cutting each square and putting it on top of each chocolate. Well as you can see, that didn't work out so well. Didn't help that my chocolate was a little cooler and thicker than I really wanted it to be (as I was doing a small batch I didn't pull out the melter). The one plus to the whole ordeal was that I finally used a wire across the bowl for scraping, and everyone is right, that works SO much better!

IMG_1231-resized.jpg

Edited by YetiChocolates (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Willow I think that your experiment would work if your chocolate was warmer and more fluid. I have dipped pieces and put them on a texture sheet... worked quite well.Give it another try!

Edited by curls (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...