Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Matiere Chocolate by Stephane Leroux


Kerry Beal
 Share

Recommended Posts

gallery_34671_3115_14887.jpg

I know at least a couple of us have this book now. It's going to take a while to try everything in there, but I got started with the granite piece.

I'd love to try some of the rolled pieces next - but the cocoa butter I have isn't in the nice little drop form that Belcolade makes and Puratos in Canada doesn't import it. I'll have to talk to them and see if since they were willing to bring the book over for us, whether they would be willing to bring the cocoa butter over for us. In the mean time, I wonder if processing chunks of cocoa butter first into something more like a powder would work - or perhaps using mycro?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kerry

That is beautiful - I sit here in my office in awe of your skill -

Thank you for that - but my only real skill is following directions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darn. That is awesome.

I'd seen the book in previews (via the eG forums also), but I can only dream of owning it (much less having the resources to actually do more than daydream with it!). Looking forward to what you guys create from it.

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am interested in participating, but only have the cash for one expensive Choc-book.

Could those in the know tell me this book or Ramon Morato's Chocolate?

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw this demoed at the World Pastry Forum two weeks ago. Vincent Pilon showed it as a showpiece base.

It's pretty easy to make. You take some chocolate chunks or discs in several colors and toss them into a blender for just a few seconds to break them into smaller, random bits. You place them within the borders of a mold which can simply be some silicone strips laying on parchment on a sheet pan. You then pour some tempered chocolate or plain colored coca butter (we saw red cocoa butter used, this was for a showpiece) over the chunk mixture until it's covered. Allow it to cool. At this point, the melted chocolate/cocoa butter will have obscured a lot of the pattern. Then, finish the edges by rubbing lightly on a heated surface like a warm sheet pan to reveal the inside pattern.

Presumably, one could make a log or big bar of this and slice it with a hot knife or wire to make individual confections. I have not tried it, nor seen it done, so I am not certain. It does seem like a good way to use up odd bits of chocolate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

fantastic! I want the book!!!! Was it difficult? Do you think it can be made somehow into a bar?Thanks for a great picture!

Might be a difficult bar - essentially you melt away the surface so I don't think it would be practical for production.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am interested in participating, but only have the cash for one expensive Choc-book.

Could those in the know tell me this book or Ramon Morato's Chocolate?

The Morato book called for a whole bunch of stuff I don't have or can't get. But it has pastry and bonbons too - this book is just info for how to make showpiece components. So depends what you want or need most I guess.

I know - I wasn't any help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

fantastic! I want the book!!!! Was it difficult? Do you think it can be made somehow into a bar?Thanks for a great picture!

Might be a difficult bar - essentially you melt away the surface so I don't think it would be practical for production.

But, you only need to melt the outer surface. I think if you had a long log of it you could just slice it with a good result.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is remarkable - how is is made (i have not got access to the book)?

Here is a link to the instructions - they are in french however.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

fantastic! I want the book!!!! Was it difficult? Do you think it can be made somehow into a bar?Thanks for a great picture!

Might be a difficult bar - essentially you melt away the surface so I don't think it would be practical for production.

But, you only need to melt the outer surface. I think if you had a long log of it you could just slice it with a good result.

Worth a try for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

imet chef leroux on the prosweets fair in cologne, very decent and humble guy :-) one of the things i never heard is that he polishes chocolate with a damp paper towel, now i do it all the time it works just great...

cheers

t.

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Link to comment
Share on other sites

imet chef leroux on the prosweets fair in cologne, very decent and humble guy :-) one of the things i never heard is that he polishes chocolate with a damp paper towel, now i do it all the time it works just great...

cheers

t.

I gave my granite a polish with a damp paper towel. It's not as shiny as his appears to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...