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Mussina

Recommendations for something new

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I need a change of scene and some new recommendations for a couple of days in NYC. I feel like I've fallen into a rut and would love some suggestions for a couple of truly exceptional dining experiences. I welcome places that specialize in ethnic food as well as stellar New American/French etc. cuisine.

Here are the "been there/done that" places that I always seem to wind up at: Jean Georges (my fav), Momofukus, EMP, Corton, Blue Hill, BHSB, Le Bernardin, Per Se, Babbo, Scarpetta, A Voce, Bar Room at Modern and Casa Mono come to mind.

Because NYC is a bit of a trip for me, I am not that interested (at least this trip) in neighborhood places that would be terrific if you lived around the corner (or the deli, hot dog, etc).

So, I welcome all suggestions and also would love input on Gramercy Tavern (I haven't been in a while and only once since Michael Anthony took over), Prune, Dovetail, Anthos, The Modern (formal) and Annisa.

Many thanks in advance!


Edited by Mussina (log)

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I need a change of scene and some new recommendations for a couple of days in NYC.  I feel like I've fallen into a rut and would love some suggestions for a couple of truly exceptional dining experiences.  I welcome places that specialize in ethnic food as well as stellar New American/French etc. cuisine.

Here are the "been there/done that" places that I always seem to wind up at: Jean Georges (my fav), Momofukus, EMP, Corton, Blue Hill, BHSB, Le Bernardin, Per Se, Babbo, Scarpetta, A Voce, Bar Room at Modern and Casa Mono come to mind.

Because NYC is a bit of a trip for me, I am not that interested (at least this trip) in neighborhood places that would be terrific if you lived around the corner (or the deli, hot dog, etc).

So, I welcome all suggestions and also would love input on Gramercy Tavern (I haven't been in a while and only once since Michael Anthony took over), Prune, Dovetail, Anthos, The Modern (formal) and Annisa.

Many thanks in advance!

I've had several meals at Gramercy since he's been there, and they've all been truly excellent. I would go back in a heartbeat. I am a huge fan of Prune - it's honest, good food without a fuss. The burger (lunch) is *really* good. Personally was underwhelmed by Dovetail. It was expensive and not in my opinion worth it. If I had to be on the UWS, I'd consider it, but otherwise would not.

(I know you're not asking about the Bar Room at the Modern, but I dined there a couple of weeks ago and it was better than it's ever been.)

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I need a change of scene and some new recommendations for a couple of days in NYC.  I feel like I've fallen into a rut and would love some suggestions for a couple of truly exceptional dining experiences.  I welcome places that specialize in ethnic food as well as stellar New American/French etc. cuisine.

Here are the "been there/done that" places that I always seem to wind up at: Jean Georges (my fav), Momofukus, EMP, Corton, Blue Hill, BHSB, Le Bernardin, Per Se, Babbo, Scarpetta, A Voce, Bar Room at Modern and Casa Mono come to mind.

Because NYC is a bit of a trip for me, I am not that interested (at least this trip) in neighborhood places that would be terrific if you lived around the corner (or the deli, hot dog, etc).

So, I welcome all suggestions and also would love input on Gramercy Tavern (I haven't been in a while and only once since Michael Anthony took over), Prune, Dovetail, Anthos, The Modern (formal) and Annisa.

Many thanks in advance!

Gramercy Tavern - click.

Modern - click.

Dovetail - click.

Prune - click.

Annisa - click or click.

Anthos - click.

As you can see, each one of the restaurants asked about has a topic of it's own - in some cases, more than one, and they're a good place to start and to ask questions about.

In addition, you could try the new talked about pizza at Keste or Co.; the new Inoteca is great, Table 8 just opened, Minetta Tavern just got 3 stars, etc.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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kyo ya is a standout for kaseiki. artful presentation, unique flavors and good sake list. it's a tranquil dining experience. i always recommend kurobuta kakuni (pork belly), ebi shinjo (shrimp mousse balls, rice crackers) and yuba & uni in the mix.

i checked in on degustation a couple of weeks ago and it's solid as ever. the 5-course tasting for $50 is still the best deal in town IMO. prune is great for dinner though it's famous for its brunch. bone marrow, sweetbreads, razorclams and head-on shrimp are musts.

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Thanks for the recommendations! It is great to get recent feedback. I had not heard of kyo ya and it sounds amazing. Do they (or Degustation) have a website by chance? Both of these places plus GT and a return visit to Bar Room at the Modern are on the short list. Thanks again.


Edited by Mussina (log)

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Degustation has no website and their menu changes often. I highly recommend it!


Michael aka "Pan

 

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I like Degustation alot too. And for another, somewhat unique, Japanese experience, I rec the bare bones, multi course kaiseki, at Tsukishi. See this old thread, http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...083&hl=tsukushi . Unlike anything else in NYC. For unique or hard to come by ethnic, we’re always craving Queen of Sheba (Ethiopian). Can’t go wrong with the veg and/or meat combos.


That wasn't chicken

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Thanks for the recommendations!  It is great to get recent feedback.  I had not heard of kyo ya and it sounds amazing.  Do they (or Degustation) have a website by chance?  Both of these places plus GT and a return visit to Bar Room at the Modern are on the short list.  Thanks again.

as pan wrote, degus doesn't have a site and neither does kyo ya. both of these restaurants are easy to miss from the sidewalk. kyo ya is unmarked besides a little wooden "open" sign on its wrought iron gate that leads you downstairs.

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Moose, would help to know where you are coming from -

TsukUshi is still very good. Has anyone compared Kyo Ya with Sugiyama? Is Sugiyama just dated or stodgy at this point?

I'm a little wary of Kyo Ya because of the michelin and the prices, but I don't want to pass judgement until I try it personally.

Sounds like you've really go the New American/French covered, and it's not hard to figure out who the new hot blondes are in this category -

Agree with EMW about Queen of Sheba. I think Curry Hill is worth a visit if you haven't been lately, Saravanaas, Tamarind..

If you haven't been to Aburiya Kinnosuke, this is a very unique ethnic Japanese experience. It serves whole categories of Japanese food not found elsewhere.

If you drive to get here, might be time to hit Flushing or Woodside, you can check out whole swaths of Asia there


Edited by raji (log)

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Moose, would help to know where you are coming from -

TsukUshi is still very good. Has anyone compared Kyo Ya with Sugiyama? Is Sugiyama just dated or stodgy at this point?

I'm a little wary of Kyo Ya because of the michelin and the prices, but I don't want to pass judgement until I try it personally.

Sounds like you've really go the New American/French covered, and it's not hard to figure out who the new hot blondes are in this category -

Agree with EMW about Queen of Sheba. I think Curry Hill is worth a visit if you haven't been lately, Saravanaas, Tamarind..

If you haven't been to Aburiya Kinnosuke, this is a very unique ethnic Japanese experience. It serves whole categories of Japanese food not found elsewhere.

If you drive to get here, might be time to hit Flushing or Woodside, you can check out whole swaths of Asia there

I've been to both Kyo Ya and Sugiyama in the last few months, and while I still like Sugiyama quite a lot, I'd say Kyo Ya is operating at the same, if not higher, level. They don't always have a full kaiseki option available, but even if they don't, there's enough there to put together a similar meal from their regular selections, all of which are VERY well prepared.

Back to the more formal choices, I'd definitely back going to the main dining room at The Modern, and also Annisa.

And if you're looking for a change of pace, I didn't say any of the "modern" places on your list. So WD-50 is always a fun shot in the arm, and Tailor is well worth checking out, for really inventive food and great cocktails to match.

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Hailing from northeastern CT - not exactly a long trip but I generally go for more memorable meals while in NYC. I can't believe I left wd-50 off my list. It is one of my favorites - esp. when they had the lunch tasting menu. So much fun.

Thanks everyone for all the suggestions. I am filling in the meal slots (although not nearly enough places are open for lunch (or offer something at the dinner level for lunch). If you were looking for an exceptional thai experience (and it doesn't have to be 100 percent authentic), what would you recommend?

Any sense what Sugiyama is like at lunch or whether Kyo Ya is open. Degustation is just dinner, correct?

Thanks again.

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Kyo Ya is also just dinner.


"I'll put anything in my mouth twice." -- Ulterior Epicure

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Thanks everyone for all the suggestions.  I am filling in the meal slots (although not nearly enough places are open for lunch (or offer something at the dinner level for lunch).  If you were looking for an exceptional thai experience (and it doesn't have to be 100 percent authentic), what would you recommend?

Any sense what Sugiyama is like at lunch or whether Kyo Ya is open.  Degustation is just dinner, correct?

yes, degus is dinner only. the 3-course prix fixe at l'ecole is a great lunch option if you haven't been.

for thai, sripraphai in woodside is probably the best option. try the pork leg w/mustard greens if you go. in manhattan, wondee siam I has a fantastic secret menu. favorites are mieng ka na (dried pork salad w/chinese broccoli leaves), watercress w/crispy pork and pork kra prao (order w/a fried egg). wondee siam II has similar off-the-menu items but not the same. saha thai is relatively unknown but chef nong is incredibly nice and will make off-the-menu kra prao (don't forget the egg) upon request. her fragrant beef noodle soup is also excellent. i haven't been to rhong tiam yet but have heard good things.

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i should add that the atmosphere and service at these thai joints do not compare to your original list of restaurants. food is the focus.

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A great new place to try is Aldea, chef driven Iberian food at a reasonable price point. It is on 17th St. betw. 5th & 6th Aves.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

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Recipe, on Amsterdam and 83rd.

Its a tiny (26 seats) greenmarket driven place, just opened last week.

Its owned by Land Thai next door, and has the same chef. I was VERY impressed by the quality and portions for the price point.

$9 foie pate (huge portion!) with toast points and shallot mustard

$16 arctic char with morels, chanterelles, peas and brown butter.

No liquor license yet, but its really comfy and is open to the street. Great place for a casual dinner, or to dine at the small bar. The staff is super-friendly too.

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What about Cafe Boulud (great lunch special these days)? Robyn

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A great new place to try is Aldea, chef driven Iberian food at a reasonable price point. It is on 17th St. betw. 5th & 6th Aves.

I second that. I ate there a couple of days ago and had a great meal. Creative and flavorful.

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Thanks for all the feedback. I have been to the Momofukus a bunch of times (and Jean Georges is my favorite restaurant in NYC). Interesting feedback on Vong and Shang - sounds like they are misses which is too bad.

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I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Tabla and Bread Bar...it continues to be one of my favorite places in the city, and you have the option of the less-formal Bread Bar vs. more formal upstairs space (Tabla). Can't beat those flavors, imo!


"I'm not eating it...my tongue is just looking at it!" --My then-3.5 year-old niece, who was NOT eating a piece of gum

"Wow--this is a fancy restaurant! They keep bringing us more water and we didn't even ask for it!" --My 5.75 year-old niece, about Bread Bar

"He's jumped the flounder, as you might say."

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I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Tabla and Bread Bar...it continues to be one of my favorite places in the city, and you have the option of the less-formal Bread Bar vs. more formal upstairs space (Tabla).  Can't beat those flavors, imo!

I've been to Bread Bar and couple of time and I am a fan. I haven't done Tabla. I know it is more formal but how does it differ menuwise?

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It's completely different.

Bread Bar is more trad Indian streetish food.

Tabla is Indian fusion, which in this case translates into standard-grade Restaurant Food with Indian flavor elements. Some people like it a lot.

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There was a spirited debate taking place about Rhong Tiam, which seems to be highly recommended as something new for the OP to try in Manhattan, but only because the Thai in Manhattan isn't that highly recommended.

That debate has been moved over to the Rhong Tiam topic. Click here to continue the debate about Rhong Tiam.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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