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Chocolate covered 'jellies'


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Title pretty much says it all. A friend requested chocolate covered jellies be found in his Christmas goodies, and the only thing that comes to mind is pate de fruits.

Is it the same thing, or are they slightly different? Is it a safe assumption that the pate de fruits would really, REALLY need to be dried- and not rolled- to do the enrobing?

I learn something new every year!! :raz:

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Title pretty much says it all. A friend requested chocolate covered jellies be found in his Christmas goodies, and the only thing that comes to mind is pate de fruits.

Is it the same thing, or are they slightly different? Is it a safe assumption that the pate de fruits would really, REALLY need to be dried- and not rolled- to do the enrobing?

I learn something new every year!!  :raz:

It's a standard on my selection, I do raspberry jellies, but cast them into half-sphere silicone molds. I use a dark 70% to enrobe,

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The fruit jellies I've found commercially available have a somewhat chewier texture - maybe they're made with gelatin or agar agar? I have made pates de fruit and dipped them in chocolate, and they're lovely. As you noted they were not rolled in sugar first, but I did pre-bottom before cutting. The only issue I had was the edges getting too thin a coating of chocolate so that you could see a bit of the pate peeking through.

Patty

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Your friend may be referring to glaceed fruits, which are typically dipped.

You can go over the top and make some wonderful slab truffles with classic ganache on the bottom and pate de fruit on top. .25" layers work well. I made some in school with passion fruit and they were out of this world!

Dan

http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll57/da...ng/100_2450.jpg

Edited to meet EGullet posting standards...

Edited by DanM (log)

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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It's funny you mention that, Dan- one of the chocolates I'm making this year is the pbjs from Greweling's book. Not quite traditional, but I can't wait to try them! I love the look of the transfers on yours.

It does seem like the jellies looked thicker, chewier- and that the solution was too easy. :biggrin: I'll start checking around for a recipe for glaceed fruits and do a little taste testing. For now though he seems thrilled with the idea of dipping the pate de fruits.

Thanks everyone!

Edited by Aza (log)
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After a little research I've ruled out glaceed fruits as what I'm after.

Does anyone have any ideas regarding getting that thicker, chewier texture? I've got 2 batches of pate de fruits here, one of them spoken for to make pbjs, but I have plenty of stuff to make more. :)

It occurs to me that maybe letting them dry longer would work, but that's likely not the usual way to do things. I'm thinking that if I can work out the details, it would be fun to mold and dip them to send off to the friend eagerly awaiting goodies in NY. :biggrin:

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  • 1 year later...

Your friend may be referring to glaceed fruits, which are typically dipped.

You can go over the top and make some wonderful slab truffles with classic ganache on the bottom and pate de fruit on top. .25" layers work well. I made some in school with passion fruit and they were out of this world!

Dan

http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll57/da...ng/100_2450.jpg

Edited to meet EGullet posting standards...

I made several Pate de fruit with G-pectin from Andrew Shotts book - Making Artisan Chocolates. (Strawberry, Raspberry and Pineapple) Pate de fruits worked find. Layered with chocolate ganache, footed, cut, air dried. I dipped in chocolate. A few days later, I notice there was a grittiness to the truffle. Seemed to be occurring between the top of the pate de fruit layer and the dipped chocolate. Any ideas as to why this might happen?

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Your friend may be referring to glaceed fruits, which are typically dipped.

You can go over the top and make some wonderful slab truffles with classic ganache on the bottom and pate de fruit on top. .25" layers work well. I made some in school with passion fruit and they were out of this world!

Dan

http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll57/da...ng/100_2450.jpg

Edited to meet EGullet posting standards...

I made several Pate de fruit with G-pectin from Andrew Shotts book - Making Artisan Chocolates. (Strawberry, Raspberry and Pineapple) Pate de fruits worked find. Layered with chocolate ganache, footed, cut, air dried. I dipped in chocolate. A few days later, I notice there was a grittiness to the truffle. Seemed to be occurring between the top of the pate de fruit layer and the dipped chocolate. Any ideas as to why this might happen?

When the water content of the jelly and the ganache differ considerably - you can get sugar dissolving in the water then precipitating out (like you get with sugar bloom).

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Does anyone have any ideas regarding getting that thicker, chewier texture?

A quick thought: pectin gives quite a short texture but gelatin a chewier one. So you might like to try adding some.

===================================================

I kept a blog during my pâtisserie training in France: Candid Cake

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