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How do I make rice that is clumpy?


shar999
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I make Jasmine Rice all the time and have enjoyed the seperated grains. Now hubby tells me he like the kind of rice you get at restaurant that is clumpy and you can pick up easily with chopesticks.

I need to know the type of rice and the preferred method of cooking. I do have a rice cooker on the way and any information would be helpful.

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Just try using a Japanese or Korean variety of rice.

I'm not sure which kind of restaurant serves "clumpy" rice, but Japanese and Korean rice, along with most short-grain varieties, hold together better.

I make Jasmine Rice all the time and have enjoyed the seperated grains.  Now hubby tells me he like the kind of rice you get at restaurant that is clumpy and you can pick up easily with chopesticks.

I need to know the type of rice and the preferred method of cooking.  I do have a rice cooker on the way and any information would be helpful.

Jason Truesdell

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I had gotten so sick of fluffy long grain rice that I bought a bag of medium grain that would cook up stickier...my husband didnt really like it. Now I mix the Basmati with 1/3 medium grain and I think we are both happy. Nice aromatic rice that is a little sticky

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Hmm, I don't have a rice cooker, but I get pretty good sticky rice this way:

(I use short grain, but it should work with other sizes)

One cup of dry rice:

-Rinse the rice in cold water until it runs clear

-Set it aside to drain in a strainer for about 30 minutes - 1 hour

-Combine the rice with 8 oz of water in pot, cover and bring to a boil over high heat...takes about 5 minutes. As soon as it reaches a boil, turn the heat to low and let the rice cook for about 15 minutes. Take the pot off the heat and let it steam for another 15 minutes.

It takes a little bit of time, but I get sticky rice every time...it should be easier once your rice cooker comes though! :smile: I think it'll do all these steps automatically...?

Edited by SanaaSol (log)
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If I want rice to be sticky, I use half long grain and half short grain rice. The label of water has something to do with the cooking too. I was taught that the first line of the middle finger is how much water you put in the rice. If you want your rice to be sticky, add a little bit more water higher than the first line of the middle finger. It does not matter how wide or how deep your sauce pan is...the measurement is still the same.

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I make Jasmine Rice all the time and have enjoyed the seperated grains.  Now hubby tells me he like the kind of rice you get at restaurant that is clumpy and you can pick up easily with chopesticks.

I need to know the type of rice and the preferred method of cooking.  I do have a rice cooker on the way and any information would be helpful.

Try using short grain or calrose rice.

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I don't recommend adding extra water to Jasmine rice which is our favorite for most things. It doesn't get sticky but mushy.

If you want rice that stays together, I agree with CommissionerLin, short grain or calrose.

I cannot bring myself to cook unwashed rice.

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I agree use Calrose and make it according to the package directions ..exactly.... then you will have sticky but not mushy rice

each grain should remain intact and distinct but they should stick together as well

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I use this recipe (courtesy of Williams-Sonoma) and have had success every time:

1 c. long-grain white rice

1 1/2 c. water

Place the rice in a colander and rinse with cold water to remove excess starch. Drain well. Combine the rice and water in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and boil, uncovered until most of the water evaporates and there arecrater-like holes in the surface of the rice, about 10 minutes.

Reduce the heat to low, cover tightly and simmer until the rice is tender, about 10-15 minutes longer. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for about 10 minutes before serving.

Just before serving, fluff the rice with a fork. Serve immediately.

The Wright Table

Becoming a better home cook, one meal at a time.

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Medium grain or short grain rice, cooked at a ratio of 1.5 rice to 1 water, will give you results "sticky" enough to eat with chopsticks. Don't add more water to long-grain rice, as it will just dissolve the grains completely (mush, as a previous poster described it). I keep basmati, jasmine, long-grain, calrose short grain, and carnaroli (for risotto) in my kitchen. Rice keeps for a long, long time, if you store it in an airtight container.

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I don't have anything that would add to what's been suggested. I just thought this thread deserved mention as a "you know you're an egulleter when..." thread. There are probably 10 billion people out there that would read it and say "Oh boo hoo, they can't get their rice to be clumpy". :biggrin:

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I'd also suggest giving the rice a good stir after it comes to a boil before leaving it alone over low heat....the agitation releases additional starch into the water, leading to extra clumpiness.

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I use butterfly brand (milagrosa) jasmine rice straight out of Thailand and unless you rinse it, a bit, it sticks together. If you've never had the milagrosa, get some. It's the best. Nothing but perfect, whole, white and un-specked, grains of fragrant jasmine rice.

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I cannot bring myself to cook unwashed rice.

Good for you BarbaraY.

Um... I get an impression from reading this thread that cooking rice without washing it first appears to be an option within contemplation. Much against my laissez-faire instincts, I can't resist delivering a tiny admondishment against this practice. Anyone who has been remotely involved in the farming, production or storage of rice will know that a major challenge in the production/storage logistics chain is keeping rodents and insects from coming into contact with the rice. In places where production and storage standards are less than fastidious, you can imagine that this goal is seldom met. Anyone who has watched "Fast Food Nation" can surely accept the notion that shoddy practices in food production can occur anywhere.

Hygiene aside, even rice produced under the most stringent conditions still needs a wash - to remove the film of rice talc (and surely dust?) from the rice grains. Use calrose rice to up the stickiness quotient and use glutinous rice to really scale the pinnacle of stodginess. But not washing rice in order to make it stickier ought not be regarded as an acceptable option. :cool:

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