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Found 434 results

  1. It's probably the combination of the frigid weather, the bag of new-crop lentilles de Puy in my cupboard and the bottle of Madiran (Château d'Aydie '95, which should be hitting its stride about now) in my drink-soon queue, but I've suddenly developed a major hankering for one of my favourite winter combo, duck confit with warm lentil salad. The problem is the duck. Back in the good old days, Boucherie de Paris, the little butcher's shop on Gatineau across from the former HEC building, sold the best confit de carnard I've ever tasted anywhere. After a quarter hour in a hot oven, it would emerge all golden and crispy-skinned and falling-off-the-bone tender. The meat had a texture somewhere between unctuous and silky and a mild yet deep, dark flavour with salt and fat in perfect balance. Had he done nothing else, then-butcher André Philippot would have earned my eternal gratitude for this triumph of gastronomy. (In fact, he did much more. I first learned of the shop when Bee McGuire proclaimed it the winner of the Gazoo's toulouseathon, its search for the Montreal's best toulouse sausage. André's terrines were also works of art.) Alas, the Philippots sold their shop a decade or so ago and retired who knows where. And while the new owner does some things as good or better, confit isn't one of them. (Neither are the toulouses; I suspect the main problem is his decision to cut back on salt and fat in deference to les goûts modernes, as he once put it.) It's not that his confit is bad, it's that it's not great. So, finally getting around to my question, who in your opinion now makes the best duck confit in the city? Although I'm mainly interested in retail outlets, please feel free to mention any restos that do a bang-up job. Thanks!
  2. Moderator Note: topics merged. If there weren't a lotta lotta other reasons to love you, Mario, and there are, and i'm not even counting the shorts though they are fetching, its the fact that you put LARDO on your pizza, and made LARDO SEXY! And made people all over the country suddently saying the world lardo with great affection, and made the word lardo a fashion statement, a destination word, a word of great desire. this in a country that has been fat-o-ohobic for years! i thought the fashionistas would pass out when they first uttered the word, but there they were, munching on your yum lardo pizza at OTTO, muttering the word lardo, lardo, lardo............ Grazie mille! is there any other food that you are passionate about at this moment that you'd care to share? marlena
  3. Does anyone have a non-pork suggestion as a substitute for pancetta? I have a recipe which I want to make, but my wife doesn't eat pork. It's a pasta dish which involves browning the pancetta until nice and crispy, and then using the fat in the rest of the dish. So I need some kind of meat which will accomplish a similar task. I guess I won't be able to get the exact same flavor, but I'd like to try something at least. Any ideas? Thanks! ~WB
  4. Last night I tried out Arthur Swartz's recipe for pasta fazool. He's fairly insistent that one brown whole sausages by starting the sausages in a cold pan with a bit of oil & then browning them over medium-low to low heat. The fresh sausages I used were "arced" so it was quite difficult--but still enjoyable--to keep moving the sausages at weird angles in order to get the middle & ends of the sides that were arced. Any techniques to make browning whole "arced" sausages easier?
  5. I have been craving biscuits with sausage gravy. I can figure out the biscuits, but can't find anything about how to make the gravy. Anyone have any ideas or places they can point me? I thank you in advance. My arteries - not so much.
  6. I adore sausages. The ancient alchemy of rescuing and transforming meat that would otherwise be unappetizing into delicious luvly sausages is surely one of humanity's greatest achievements. Luvly, luvly sau... Um. Do you like sausages? If so, what is your favourite? What is the best way to prepare them?
  7. I have a confession to make. I've never used my meat grinder. It just lurks in my cabinet, glaring at me from behind the box of coffee filters. Am I a bad person? And if I wanted, say, to make sausage, what kind is good to start with? Do you have a favorite recipe? Chad (snacking on last night's andouille cornbread, mmmm)
  8. I used to get great bacon mail order from Thielen's in Minnesota, but they don't ship out of state any more. Any suggestions? Thanks.
  9. A day without bacon is like a day without bacon.
  10. Short of purchasing a professional deli slicer for several hundred dollars, devoting half your kitchen counter space to it, and spending an hour cleaning its parts after each use, what options are there for cutting deli meats super-thin? Even with my best knives, I can't do it. Can a sushi chef do it? Is it even possible to do this without a rapidly spinning blade? Is there some cheap device I don't know about that accomplishes the task with aplomb, or even without aplomb? Of course you can get things sliced when you purchase them, but in my experience they degrade rapidly once sliced. So I'd love to be able to do it to order at home.
  11. I made a quick chicken confit this Sunday. Here is an idea of the recipe: curing chicken thighs for an hour or so straight in the baking dish that holds thighs snugly; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin down; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin up; roasting them in 450F for 20 minutes or so skin up until skin is browned and crackling. The end result is divine. Now here is my question about this thing that is left after confiting. There is a layer of fat and whatever other pan juices. It's really a pity to throw this away. But how can i use this stuff? Thank you.
  12. Hey Y'all- I've been very successful at making tesa (flat pancetta) and various fermented, moulded salamis for our restaurant, but have a couple of questions regarding whole-muscle cuts, (think culatello, lomo, speck, etc.) 1. For the coppa and lomo I have curing/hanging presently, I have used a 5% salt to raw weight ratio. If the initial cure is done in plastic bags, will this be about right? I know that prosciutti require 6%, but I figured that since they are allowed to "drip" and contain the bone, then 5% should be about right for boneless, "wet-cured" cuts. 2. The FDA requires 200 ppm nitrite in dry cured meat products. Cure #1 is 6.25% nitrite by weight, so the calculation for nitrite addition is easy, but the #2 cure I am using, (from Butcher & Packer), is 5.67% nitrite and 3.63% nitrate. Should I calculate for a nitrite value to equal 200 ppm, or should I just assume that over the hanging time the nitrate will be degraded into the appropriate level of nitrite? 3. Culatello is called the "heart of the prosciutto". Am I to assume that this is a single-muscle cut containing only the pork top round, or is it "harvested" including other muscles? 4. Which muscles/muscle groups are used to produce real Südtirol-style Speck? 5. Where the hell does one find hog bladders!!?? Thanks in advance for your input, you'll see a lot more of me around here.... Erich
  13. I'm in the mood for Spanish food, and a surprising large number of recipes in Penelope Casas' early book call for blood sausage. Not a lot of morcilla. And it's usually optional. But I want to make the dish right! Is there anything I can use to substitute (I could get blood from the Asian market, but it's not cooked)? Anything else that would get close? Are there any sources for morcilla in the U.S.? And if I found a supply of morcilla, is this something that I could freeze?
  14. Simply this-I've been making many kinds for a while and they are really good, but the texture of the (always natural)casing when cooked never pleases me-a damp bend rather than the crisp yielding I'm looking for. Ideas, anyone? Thanks!
  15. Last night on the FoodNetwork Micheal Symon did chocolate covered bacon on Dinner Impossible segment. I guess he's the new host. Anyway, everyone loved it. Has anyone done this before? I'm thinking of doing it for the Holidays. I'm worried about the shelf life though. Would probably have to do it on a made to order and not in advance.... Any thoughts? Thanks, Rena
  16. HI, Are there any mail order sources for Chourico or Linguica other than Gaspars? Tim
  17. The Ferry Building has the shiny new Boccalone shop, they've got all sorts of delicious stuff available and a beautiful display fridge full of cured meats. Go check it out. Immediately. I'll try and take some pictures on Saturday when I'm back at the Ferry Plaza for the Farmers Market.
  18. I consider myself an advanced beginner, sometimes intermediate type cook. I can make a mean risotto and have no problem cooking steak to temp. I'm good at the fairly straightforward stuff. When I cook pancetta, the only thing I do with it is brown it in a frying pan then add it to whatever I'm using. However I had dinner at a pretty good restaurant the other night and had a dish that had pancetta that melted like butter when it hit my tongue. I just sat there dumbfounded like "damn, I wish I could make pancetta like that..." I'm thinking that soft, meltingly tender pancetta mixed into risotto or mashed potatoes would be nothing short of sublime. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
  19. Does anyone know where I can order some vegetarian sausage casings that are comparable to the natural, edible ones? Ones that have that snap when you bite into them.
  20. Hello I've got a glut of lamb to use up and im after a good recipe for a lamb sausage. If possible, I want to avoid having to add pork fat. Open to any ideas just as long as its good! Many thanks
  21. I'm originally from Chicago, living in New Orleans for the time being. A coworker, also originally from Illinois, asked me to pick her up some Polish Sausage on my upcoming trip home. I'll be based in the south suburbs, but I should be in the city a fair amount, and I'm willing to travel wherever. So where can I find the absolute best -bar none- Polish Sausage?
  22. Hi All, Does anyone have this recipe from Gourmet Magazine? I'm supposed to teach an informal cooking class next Wednesday and thought it would be the perfect dish to start with. This particular Gourmet has a peach tart on the cover and has recipes from Thomas Keller in it. Help? Thanks! Patti
  23. Anyone doing diy link sausage- please point me in the right direction to find some interesting combos for sausage making. I've been tasked with coming up with 6 interesting sausages this week, both exciting and intimidating as I've never made sausage before! We have a kitchenaid mixer with the grinding and stuffing accessories, and I've picked up some casings as well. Thanks in advance for your ideas and suggestions! Warmly, Shai
  24. So I am partnering with a local pork producer who specializes in amazing berkshire pork but also raises lamb and some grassfed beef (DWFarms). I have offered to make them some sausage recipes to sell at the farmers market. The sausage they have made so far has some texture issues. I assumed that being a leaner pork and a very small farm they were using mostly scrap and did not follow the proper ratios for sausage. My first batch with a proper lean meat to fat ratio as well as a batch with an increased fat ratio also had this texture issue, dry and crumbly. Obviously it is a fat emulsification issue. I tried a mousseline route with heavy cream but no panada. Besides the next step of adding a panada does anyone have any suggestions? Adding any pork besides theirs is not a possibility.
  25. Hi all -- Just wondering if anyone a) thinks it is possible to make a really good chicken (or turkey, I suppose) sausage and b) if so, if you have a recipe you'd share. I typically have shied away from poultry sausage, figuring it just couldn't be as good as luscious fatty pork... But then I figured, I'd actually wind up eating sausage more often if there was a tasty version that wasn't made with luscious fatty pork... Thanks in advance! Emily
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