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Confection frames


ChristopherMichael
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I'm looking at buying confection frames for ganache centers. Does anyone know where to buy them other than Tomric (they dont stock anything and I don't want to wait 3- 4 weeks) or Pastry Chef (to expensive)? Here's a link to what I'm looking for.

http://www.tomric.com/ItemDetail.aspx?cmd=local&item=4969

Thanks in advance.

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I'm looking at buying confection frames for ganache centers. Does anyone know where to buy them other than Tomric (they dont stock anything and I don't want to wait 3- 4 weeks) or Pastry Chef (to expensive)? Here's a link to what I'm looking for.

http://www.tomric.com/ItemDetail.aspx?cmd=local&item=4969

Thanks in advance.

Try design realization. www.dr.ca - look under pastry equipment

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JB Prince has stacking frames that you can use, depending on the volume. For smaller amounts, a rectangular tart form works well, you just have to put it on something perfectly flat. At Le Cirque we used to use these 1/2" pieces of plastic bonded together at the corners.

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I'm confused, what isn't what you're looking for?

This is what I'm looking for.

http://www.tomric.com/ItemDetail.aspx?cmd=local&item=4969

I know that Tomric and Pastry Chef central carries them, but I'm looking for another source that can get them faster than Tomric and cheaper than Pastry Chef Central. Thanks

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I must need some new glasses because the ones on dr.com look exactly like the ones on tomric :blink:

Jason

You don't need glasses, because those are just like them. The only problem is that they're even more expensive than Pastry Chef Central, which is why I'm not going to buy from them.

sorry, you made it sound like they were 2 different things , and that is why you are still looking, not because of price.

Jason

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The problem is that I'm being to vague. I was under the assumption that these types of frames are very common with most chocolatiers and pastry chefs. So when I posted the link to the frames and people saw what I'm talking about then they would know right away. As for price, I know they can be had for less than $45, which is what Pastry Chef Central charges. The only reason why I haven't ordered them from Tomric is because they don't stock them and it takes them atleast 3-4 weeks to get them from their supplier. So to sum it up, I thought that someone migh know the source these two places get them from and thought I can try to buy them direct or even another company that sells them.

What I'm looking for exactly is a stainless steel frame that measures 375mm x 375mm x 10mm. Picture link is above.

Thanks

Edited by ChristopherMichael (log)
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Perhaps the problem you're having is that most of us use common sheet pans or confectionery rulers. Some of us use tart pans or have had tap plastics custom make what we need. While it is a common tool , many of us have found ways around pricing or unacceptable timelines. Others of us are fine with a 4 week delivery date. Some options have been presented here, hopefully you'll find the one which works best for you.

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Perhaps the problem you're having is that most of us use common sheet pans or confectionery rulers.  Some of us use tart pans or have had tap plastics custom make what we need.  While it is a common tool , many of us have found ways around pricing or unacceptable timelines.  Others of us are fine with a 4 week delivery date.  Some options have been presented here, hopefully you'll find the one which works best for you.

Like I said before, I appreciate the ideas.

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Perhaps the problem you're having is that most of us use common sheet pans or confectionery rulers.  Some of us use tart pans or have had tap plastics custom make what we need.  While it is a common tool , many of us have found ways around pricing or unacceptable timelines.  Others of us are fine with a 4 week delivery date.  Some options have been presented here, hopefully you'll find the one which works best for you.

i've heard of the rulers, but how are they used?

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Perhaps the problem you're having is that most of us use common sheet pans or confectionery rulers.  Some of us use tart pans or have had tap plastics custom make what we need.  While it is a common tool , many of us have found ways around pricing or unacceptable timelines.  Others of us are fine with a 4 week delivery date.  Some options have been presented here, hopefully you'll find the one which works best for you.

i've heard of the rulers, but how are they used?

Check out the confectionary course pictures of the rulers here. Fourth picture down shows the rulers, then scroll further down to see them in use for caramel.

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Perhaps the problem you're having is that most of us use common sheet pans or confectionery rulers.  Some of us use tart pans or have had tap plastics custom make what we need.  While it is a common tool , many of us have found ways around pricing or unacceptable timelines.  Others of us are fine with a 4 week delivery date.  Some options have been presented here, hopefully you'll find the one which works best for you.

i've heard of the rulers, but how are they used?

Check out the confectionary course pictures of the rulers here. Fourth picture down shows the rulers, then scroll further down to see them in use for caramel.

thanks kerry, for sharing your wealth of knowledge.

Looking at the pics, do they lock into place? i'm assuming they can made to different sizes as well.

luis

Edited by sote23 (log)
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they don't lock into place. they are very heavy/dense metal so they stay in place due to their own weight. they also don't warp because they are so solid. i'm sure you could tape them if you're concerned.

i had tap plastic make me a custom frame for caramel and it ended up being about $45 dollars anyway. and the particular store i went to wouldn't square off the inside corners, so i have rounded corners in my frame. but i do like the options and flexibility of getting something custom.

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they don't lock into place.  they are very heavy/dense metal so they stay in place due to their own weight.  they also don't warp because they are so solid.  i'm sure you could tape them if you're concerned.

i had tap plastic make me a custom frame for caramel and it ended up being about $45 dollars anyway.  and the particular store i went to wouldn't square off the inside corners, so i have rounded corners in my frame.  but i do like the options and flexibility of getting something custom.

oh ok, no it's not a concern, just didn't know how they stayed in place. I've heard tap plastic mentioned before, i will have to look into them.

Luis

Edited by sote23 (log)
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Looking at the pics, do they lock into place? i'm assuming they can made to different sizes as well.

luis

The beauty of caramel rulers is that you can adjust them to any size you need. These ones are just some stainless bar I had cut by the Metal Supermarket. Got hubby to polish the ends and remove any burrs for me. I seem to recall they cost me less than $30.

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Looking at the pics, do they lock into place? i'm assuming they can made to different sizes as well.

luis

The beauty of caramel rulers is that you can adjust them to any size you need. These ones are just some stainless bar I had cut by the Metal Supermarket. Got hubby to polish the ends and remove any burrs for me. I seem to recall they cost me less than $30.

thanks kerry, that is a great idea. Any idea what size or thickness they are, so I can look for the same thing.

the ones I see for sale such as this one, don't seem to be as hefty as what your using.

http://www.pastrysampler.com/Products/360.htm

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Looking at the pics, do they lock into place? i'm assuming they can made to different sizes as well.

luis

The beauty of caramel rulers is that you can adjust them to any size you need. These ones are just some stainless bar I had cut by the Metal Supermarket. Got hubby to polish the ends and remove any burrs for me. I seem to recall they cost me less than $30.

thanks kerry, that is a great idea. Any idea what size or thickness they are, so I can look for the same thing.

the ones I see for sale such as this one, don't seem to be as hefty as what your using.

http://www.pastrysampler.com/Products/360.htm

These are my light ones actually. They are 3/8 by 1 inch. I had 2 cut 8 inches long, 2 cut 12 inches long. The first set I had made were 1/2 inch by 1 inch, two were 18 inches, two were 12 inches. They are a challenge to fit on the counter. I don't need them that big, and I certainly don't need them that heavy. I didn't realize at the time that they would hold themselves up just fine at about half the weight.

I bet you could get 1/4 by 1 inch and it would be just fine.

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Looking at the pics, do they lock into place? i'm assuming they can made to different sizes as well.

luis

The beauty of caramel rulers is that you can adjust them to any size you need. These ones are just some stainless bar I had cut by the Metal Supermarket. Got hubby to polish the ends and remove any burrs for me. I seem to recall they cost me less than $30.

thanks kerry, that is a great idea. Any idea what size or thickness they are, so I can look for the same thing.

the ones I see for sale such as this one, don't seem to be as hefty as what your using.

http://www.pastrysampler.com/Products/360.htm

These are my light ones actually. They are 3/8 by 1 inch. I had 2 cut 8 inches long, 2 cut 12 inches long. The first set I had made were 1/2 inch by 1 inch, two were 18 inches, two were 12 inches. They are a challenge to fit on the counter. I don't need them that big, and I certainly don't need them that heavy. I didn't realize at the time that they would hold themselves up just fine at about half the weight.

I bet you could get 1/4 by 1 inch and it would be just fine.

Thanks Kerry, you've been most helpful.

I have another question for you. I've seen these chocolate stencils. How are these used.

http://www.tomric.com/Section.aspx?cmd=local&cat=12&sec=31

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Try checking with sheet metal or machine shops in your area. They may be able to fabricate something for you out of stainless steel sheet metal. You could also see if they could make it out of aluminum which would be much lighter and a bit less expensive.

These shops are a great source of metal baking sheets. You can often get some great deals on remnant pieces that can be used for baking or whatever.

If you really want to make something on the cheap, head to your local hardware store and by some square tubing or angle iron of the desired height and cut it to size yourself.

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I have another question for you. I've seen these chocolate stencils. How are these used.

http://www.tomric.com/Section.aspx?cmd=local&cat=12&sec=31

Luis,

Those stencils allow you to make fairly thin even chocolate shapes. You can put a transfer sheet underneath them, pour tempered chocolate over top, scrape and let crystallize.

My friend Mari uses them to make her mendiants (discs of chocolate with fruit and nuts topping them). She does about 1/2 a mat at a time, quickly working to press the crystallized nuts, raisins and dried fruit on to each.

Check here for a picture of some freeform mendiants.

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I have another question for you. I've seen these chocolate stencils. How are these used.

http://www.tomric.com/Section.aspx?cmd=local&cat=12&sec=31

Luis,

Those stencils allow you to make fairly thin even chocolate shapes. You can put a transfer sheet underneath them, pour tempered chocolate over top, scrape and let crystallize.

My friend Mari uses them to make her mendiants (discs of chocolate with fruit and nuts topping them). She does about 1/2 a mat at a time, quickly working to press the crystallized nuts, raisins and dried fruit on to each.

Check here for a picture of some freeform mendiants.

I've seen them, just never knew what they were used for. thanks again for the help.

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