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mrose

Demo: Pan Coating Candy

41 posts in this topic

Kerry that's an awesome demo it should have is own space though , maybe they can move it and make a panning demo .

Thank you sooo much for sharing this with us, I am so used to people that into the baking confectionary business dont share anything and keep everything secret and thigh ( lots of the italian bakers /chocolatiers etc for exmples ), I find it always amazing and warming to see professional sharing their technique with others that are passionate about , even if you might never try panning or do other complicated stuff , its good to know and to see just for the knowledge of it.

Thank you

Sincerly


Vanessa

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Kerry,

Thanks so much for demonstrating this. Really look forward to seeing to the polishing stage as well. A couple of quick questions if you don't mind...

What's the maximum amount of product you've put in the panner at once? I see for the purposes of this demo you used about a 1/2 pound of espresso beans. What's the capacity tolerance before it just becomes a gunky mess? And about how long did the above process take from beginning to end?

Again, thanks so much. It would have taken me a lot of trial and error on my own to figure this out. You've saved me much time and money. :biggrin:

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Kerry,

Thanks so much for demonstrating this.  Really look forward to seeing to the polishing stage as well.  A couple of quick questions if you don't mind...

What's the maximum amount of product you've put in the panner at once?  I see for the purposes of this demo you used about a 1/2 pound of espresso beans.  What's the capacity tolerance before it just becomes a gunky mess?  And about how long did the above process take from beginning to end? 

Again, thanks so much.  It would have taken me a lot of trial and error on my own to figure this out.  You've saved me much time and money.  :biggrin:

The maximum amount is determined by the amount of finished product that will fit in the pan. I can't really tell you by weight. Figure that if you start with almonds you are going to add a nice thick layer of chocolate (at least the way I like them) and that will cause your product to fill the pan. I've put in way too much and had almonds flying out the front. For a very rough rule of thumb, fill to less than half way up the bottom of the pan before you turn it on.

I'll have to do some almonds later today cause hubby is out of them, I'll try to remember to weigh first.

I took me less than an hour start to finish, which includes melting the chocolate, cooling it down 'cause it got too warm (then heating it back up 'cause it got too cold), running everything down to the basement and back again, and cleaning up. The coating pan had a thick layer of chocolate and polish on it, so I took the heat gun to it and gave it a quick scrape out. I also spent a good 5 minutes in my husbands workshop trying to find hearing protection unsucessfully.

3 minutes with dry ice initially to cool down the product, 1-3 minutes per aliquot of chocolate applied for it to harden, 3 minutes or so each time you warm up to smooth out the bumps.

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gallery_34671_2984_63503.jpg

The coffee beans before polishing.

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The polish.

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My hubby made me this blower out of PVC pipe with a fan attached. I put some dry ice in the central part so it can blow cool air. Alternately you could take a small air conditioner and attach piping to it in some way to blow cool dry air.

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Start the beans spinning and add a full dropper full of polish.

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Start blowing the cool air into the beans, reach and a take a handful to see if the beans are dry.

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Next add a half dropper full of polish. Once each aliquot is added check until it is dry. Add half as much each time until the beans are dry and they start to look a shiny.

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Shiny beans.

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Measure out a full dropper of the shellac

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Add the shellac very slowly, over about 2 minutes. Then let it tumble for 5 minutes before applying the cool air to dry off the alchohol.

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Finished coffee beans. A bit lumpy. Total time to polish about 20 minutes.

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Kerry

Thank you for posting the demo. It answered a lot of questions & will save a lot of basic trial and error. It makes me wish the class on panning was being offered this year (esp if it was in Madison again). I'm going to watch out for it.

Mark


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Kerry

Thank you for posting the demo. It answered a lot of questions & will save a lot of basic trial and error. It makes me wish the class on panning was being offered this year (esp if it was in Madison again). I'm going to watch out for it.

Mark

Mark,

The course was my first time in Madison. What a delightful town. It was also my first experience with Penzey's spices, a place well worth visiting again.

First night we went looking for a place to eat quite late, found a nice little student restaurant that served bar food. On the menu there was cheese curd. Being from Canada we figured cheese curd either came in a bag, nice and squeeky on the teeth, or with french fries and gravy as poutine. It arrived deep fried, with salad dressing, and when we asked if this was curd they replied "you guys aren't from around here are ya?"

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Kerry

Madison is great. I went to the UW & lived there for about 25 years. It is especially beautiful during the summer months. I went into Penzey's several years ago during our annual summer visit to a friend who has a house on Lake Mendota. I can sit & look at the lake for hours. The city always bring back good memories.

The university is what makes the city. There is an awful lot happening for a city of that size.

Mark


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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So here is the stuff I coated this evening.

gallery_34671_2984_33537.jpggallery_34671_2984_60151.jpg

About 1200 grams of almonds before and after coating. I used about 1 kg of milk chocolate to coat them. It took about 15 minutes for the actual coating. WhiteTruffleGirl - I suspect I could coat about 2.5 kg or so of nuts before worrying about the capacity of the pan after coating.

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800 grams of really big fat raisins, before and after coating with about 750 grams of milk chocolate. It took about 10 minutes or so to coat them.

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As you can see it is difficult to fill all the nooks and crannies of raisins.

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Awesome pics Kerry , again, demo demo demo! :biggrin:


Vanessa

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Does anyone bought the coating pan yet?I dont know why but tonight I was thinking about it again , after a while, and was thinking to give it a try ( even though I have few more things I need to get ).


Vanessa

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I am looking into getting a candy coating pan. I would like to hear people's experiences with them & any tips you could give me in their usage. Thanks

I have the french unit that goes on the front of the kitchen aid that I bought through Beryls and have been experimenting with it recently.

Hi Kerry,

Do you have a link to that Kitchen Aid attachment. I couldn't find it on the Beryls site.

Thanks!

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I am looking into getting a candy coating pan. I would like to hear people's experiences with them & any tips you could give me in their usage. Thanks

I have the french unit that goes on the front of the kitchen aid that I bought through Beryls and have been experimenting with it recently.

Hi Kerry,

Do you have a link to that Kitchen Aid attachment. I couldn't find it on the Beryls site.

Thanks!

Doesn't look like Beryl's in carrying it anymore - I think it was a bit of a loss leader for her.

Looks like pastrychef.com has it, and I know that Design and Realization (www.dr.ca) make one of their own.

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Doesn't look like Beryl's in carrying it anymore - I think it was a bit of a loss leader for her.

Looks like pastrychef.com has it, and I know that Design and Realization (www.dr.ca) make one of their own.

Kerry,

Would you say that this is the best deal that you have seen, or have you found other options that are less expensive, or perhaps have more capacity for the same or similar price?

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Doesn't look like Beryl's in carrying it anymore - I think it was a bit of a loss leader for her.

Looks like pastrychef.com has it, and I know that Design and Realization (www.dr.ca) make one of their own.

Kerry,

Would you say that this is the best deal that you have seen, or have you found other options that are less expensive, or perhaps have more capacity for the same or similar price?

Well if you watch e-bay you sometimes see a little lab sized unit. I got an old Stokes unit for about $500 - but hubby had to clean it all up, change the engine oil, paint it for me. If you had to pay someone to do that it would be expensive. Darn thing weighs about 300lbs and I had to pick it up in New Jersey.

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Well if you watch e-bay you sometimes see a little lab sized unit.  I got an old Stokes unit for about $500 - but hubby had to clean it all up, change the engine oil, paint it for me.  If you had to pay someone to do that it would be expensive.  Darn thing weighs about 300lbs and I had to pick it up in New Jersey.

Thanks.

Also looks like Union Standard has some different types of used table-top/lab machines. I don't know the pricing though.

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Well if you watch e-bay you sometimes see a little lab sized unit.  I got an old Stokes unit for about $500 - but hubby had to clean it all up, change the engine oil, paint it for me.  If you had to pay someone to do that it would be expensive.  Darn thing weighs about 300lbs and I had to pick it up in New Jersey.

Thanks.

Also looks like Union Standard has some different types of used table-top/lab machines. I don't know the pricing though.

They aren't cheap! But they do have motors.

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