Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: tejon - Pepper Steak and Power Tools


tejon
 Share

Recommended Posts

Rolled out the chapatis, cooked them in a large skillet, brushed with butter, then stacked in a cloth to keep warm:

gallery_28661_3_38683.jpg

For dinner itself, I started some cauliflower by heating mustard seeds and coriander in some hot oil, then adding fresh ginger. Turmeric and some cayenne followed closely, then in went the cauliflower. A few minutes later I added salt, then turned down the heat and covered the pan. Twenty minutes later the cauliflower was tender and infused with flavor. Then I chopped onions and cooked them in hot oil until just crisp-tender. Added beaten eggs mixed with salt, then stirred it all together quickly as the eggs set up. Onto a plate, then a sprinkle of roasted ground cumin, red chile, and cilantro.

I'm full :biggrin:.

gallery_28661_3_56523.jpg

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love tea in all forms, from chamomile to Darjeeling to genmae. One of my most favorite cups of tea is warmed with spices and mellowed with milk and a little bit of sugar. For my final food post, nothing could be more appropriate than the purest comfort food I know.

Masala Chai

serves 4

1 small cinnamon stick

6 cardamom pods

(or 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom)

4 cloves

6 peppercorns

3 cups water

1/4 cup sugar

1 cup milk

3 heaping teaspoons loose tea or 4 tea bags (orange pekoe)

Place spices and tea leaves (if using) in a tea ball or tie in cheesecloth so you can remove them later. Place water and spices in medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, then cover pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Add sugar, milk and tea leaves or bags, bring to a simmer, turn off heat and cover again. Let mixture sit for 2 - 3 minutes to allow tea to steep. Strain and serve.

It's a wonder that a few twigs, leaves, and flower buds can scent the whole house and bring such flavor to a simple cup of tea.

gallery_28661_3_139021.jpg

Tonight I made enough for Dan and me to share :smile:.

gallery_28661_3_171727.jpg

Edited by tejon (log)

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Kathy,

Thank you for letting us into your home - it's been a pleasure to read your blog. I particularly enjoyed reading about your inherited recipe cards and cookbook* and, being a mom of two kids, your experiences with getting your kids to eat. I admire your ability to blog just before you're about to move and also agree with all those that said you are pretty.

Suman

*I must admit, they did make me envious too, because my grandmother never wrote recipes down - I grieve for all those recipes that never got passed on from her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, everyone! I have had such an incredible experience this week. There's something about food that touches something deep inside, isn't there? I feel as if I've opened up my kitchen and my family and been warmly received.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used one of my absolute favorite kitchen tools to core the apple. I got this from my Grandma's kitchen and couldn't for the life of me figure out what it was for at first. I finally admitted that I had no clue, and was told it was used for coring apples and other hard fruit. Gave it a try and I was in love. It's very sharp at the edges and does a quick job of cutting through just about any piece of produce I use it on. I use it almost every day and marvel at how well it works every single time.

gallery_28661_3_166090.jpg

I have that same gizmo! Mom and Dad found it and gave it to me as a stocking stuffer - it was the triumph of the season for them to find one for me, after they watched me struggling to pit the best peaches of the summer. I never thought to try it on apples. I always use it to pit cling peaches and nectarines, and my parents called it a peach pitter. I like it on the clings because I can work it right in and around the pit without struggling to split the peach first.

Roasted cumin that will be used later tonight:

gallery_28661_3_52077.jpg

I love the flavor of cumin once it's been roasted and ground. It gets a smoky, earthy taste that goes well with all kinds of things.

I used a coffee grinder that is used exclusively for spices. I usually toss in some oats or breadcrumbs and whir for a few moments to clean it out afterwards.

gallery_28661_3_129534.jpg

Chapati dough resting:

gallery_28661_3_119771.jpg

Details, details! I toast cumin atop the stove. Do you roast it in the oven? For how long, and at what temperature?

Finally: did you give a recipe for the chapati dough upthread, that I missed because I'm hurrying before your blog ends? If not, is that something you can share?

No, this is finally: I'm wiping drool off my computer screen after looking at those cookies. I'll have to try those, complete with the technique tips. They just *might* be better than mine... :wub:

No, THIS is finally (unless I post again :wink: ): as with everyone else, I'm so glad you put your own face to the blog (you beautiful woman you), and I'm so glad you blogged this week! Thank you! It's been a wonderful blog.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haven't had a chance to try that on peaches, but I bet that's exactly what my Grandparents used it for most, since they had quite an abundance of peaches every summer. Have to give it a try next peach season.

I roast cumin on the stove as well. Medium heat and a heavy pan until they smell fragrant and turn color.

Chapati:

2 cups atta or chapati flour (or 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour mixed with 1 cup AP or cake flour)

1 teaspoon salt

1 Tablespoon vegetable oil

about 3/4 cup warm water (enough for a kneadable dough)

Mix all ingredients, then knead until smooth. Cover and let rest for at least an hour or so to let the gluten relax. Divide into 10-12 balls, roll flat (dust with more flour to avoid sticking), then bake one at a time over medium heat in a heavy pan. Brush with butter and serve.

Edited by tejon (log)

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm off to yoga class, so this will be my last contribution to the blog. I feel as if I've had a huge party overflowing with goodwill and great conversation. Thanks to everyone - my kitchen will always be open to you :wub:.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...