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How to clarify stock?


CRUZMISL
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Hi All,

I like to make my chicken stock in my pressure cooker sinc e it only takes an hour or so. The stock tastes fine but the pressure cooker is very turbulent and doesn't yield the clearest stock. After I strain it through cheesecloth it is still not as clear as I'd like. Is there any way to clarify it?

Thanks,

Joe

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You mean like consommé?

I've never done this with stock made in a pressure cooker (anal-retentive enough to sit there and skim/simmer for 12 hours), but:

2-3 egg whites

approximately 1/4 pound ground chicken meat (because it's chicken stock)

1 onion and carrot, minced

Whisk egg whites slightly and add to the other ingredients. Mix thoroughly and chill (it better be really cold).

Use a pot with a relatively narrow diameter because the mix has to spread out across the top. Mix the stock with mix and slowly heat in the pot until it comes to a boil. DON'T MIX! It's supposed to form a crust.

Once the crust is thoroughly cooked, sieve again through cheesecloth.

Good luck.

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One method which looks very intriguing by Heston Blumenthal is to freeze the stock into cubes and let them thaw over a coffee filter. The water part of the stock will thaw first and drip through while the solids are held together by the rest of the ice.

It seems to me that this method of clarifying stock would lead to larger yields and less of that eggy taste.

Personally, I don't see much point in clarifying stock unless it's for something that absolutely requires it. The cloudy bits in stock add flavour.

PS: I am a guy.

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I make stock in a pressure cooker all the time and it's clear. The first trick is to make sure the pressure cooker never reaches the point where it "blows off steam." Let the pressure go up to the second mark, but never higher. Once the cooker begins to vent steam, the stock will boil, which causes the cloudiness. Below the boiling point (which is elevated inside the pressure cooker above 100C), the stock inside won't boil. The second trick I use for a white chicken stock (unroasted bones) is to blanch the bones to a full boil first, then pour off the water and all the gunk (denatured proteins that cloud the stock), rinse off the pieces, then put back in a clean pot with fresh water and veg. It's an extra step, but I make a couple gallons each time and it's worth it. Far easier than clarifying the stock afterwards.

He who distinguishes the true savor of his food can never be a glutton; he who does not cannot be otherwise. --- Henry David Thoreau
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