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Beef tartare


hjshorter
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I have a confession to make.

I don't really like beef tartare.

I want to. Really really want to. But every time I get a lovely piece of steak at home I am compelled to grill it. Restaurants versions have let me down so many times that I am hesistant to give it another go. But I will.

Where can I get it done right?

Edited by hjshorter (log)

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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If you promise not to laugh.....

I've eaten steak tartare all over town. My favorite is still at The Guards on M St. in Georgetown. Second place is Bistro Français.

I absolutely will not laugh, but I had no idea it was on their menu. Thanks for the tip.

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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If you promise not to laugh.....

I've eaten steak tartare all over town. My favorite is still at The Guards on M St. in Georgetown. Second place is Bistro Français.

I absolutely will not laugh, but I had no idea it was on their menu. Thanks for the tip.

At The Guards, its an appetizer. Freshly chopped, it is moist and well seasoned. At Bistro F, its a main course with excellent frites.

Mark

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I love the korean version, Yukhwe (sp?). Slices over very thin raw beef. The best example (around washington DC that I've found) of it is at Woo Lee Oak. Really good. I wish I could make it at home but like Sashimi I'm too chicken about getting the right ingrediant and preparing correctly so I won't end up sick.

Soup

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I just had an excellent version at Bistro Bis on Thursday night. I am a big believer in steak tartare as a starter, not as an entree--it's rich and full of strong flavors and I think a huge portion of it is somewhat gross. It's an app on the BB menu, and it comes with yummy house-made potato chips and crocks of cornichons and French-style mustard for crunching and dabbing.

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I'm with Mark on Bistro Francais (haven't had it at The Guards), though one night, when I was living in Denver and in DC for work, we had a minor service kerfuffle when I demanded a fork in my "to go" bag. "Don't you have a fork at home?" "Yes, several, but I'm staying in a hotel." They finally gave me restaurant fork just to get rid of me.

It's not hard to make at home, either. I usally use something less glorious than, say, a prime ribeye, so the temptation to grill is less.

bmiller: Go, go, kitfo! We've found that you have to specify that you want it raw, though, because at Ethiopian places they sometimes cook it without asking ,when Americans order it. Mrs. Busboy, the expert, likes Addis Abbaba's. For the unitiated: it's an Ethiopian dish in which raw ground meat is mixed with peppery spiced butter and served with an Ethiopian cheese that's maybe a cross between feta and queso fresco.

Breaking News: Perhaps inspired by this thread, Stephanie just ordered some kitfo (among other things) for delivery from AA. As she was sitting out back and the connection was dubious and the order-taker's English even more dubious, everyone in the alley-way behind our house just got to hear her yelling: "raw...raw...do not cook...DO NOT COOK THE KITFO!" This approach usually, but not inevitably, works.

Edited by Busboy (log)

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Breaking News: Perhaps inspired by this thread, Stephanie just ordered some kitfo (among other things) for delivery from AA.  As she was sitting out back and the connection was dubious and the order-taker's English even more dubious, everyone in the alley-way behind our house just got to hear her yelling:  "raw...raw...do not cook...DO NOT COOK THE KITFO!"  This approach usually, but not inevitably, works.

:laugh: I am reminded of the evening that I went to Dukem with the two of you - we did not manage to get the point across despite sending it back once.

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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I've had the same problems at Dukem - always assuring the server I actually want it uncooked and then going through the same with the manager when it comes to the table. I’ve only ordered take out once from them, and they didn’t make the kitfo because they assumed that there must have been some mistake in my order.

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having recently re-partaked of bistro francais' version, i can definitely attest to its status as the paragon of raw ruminants seasoned liberally with mustard and other delectables. washed down with a bottle of gigondas: raw meat and velvety red wine, what's not to like?

like malawry, i do share the belief in its inherent richness and thus, it was shared. for the sybaritic and indulgent out there though, this would make a very appropiate and delicious meal.

there is no love sincerer than the love of food

- george bernard shaw

i feel like love is in the kitchen with a culinary eye, think she's making something special and i'm smart enough to try

- interpol

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I actually think that the fabulously marbled cuts you'd grill would be wasted in tartare anyway - lumps of hard, cold white fat sound pretty off-putting. I'd go with hand-chopping a good quality lean piece - maybe a decent sirloin. As I'm typing, I'm thinking tartare would also be a clever, acceptable use of filet - you've certainly got tenderness and uniformity of texture covered, and there's enough other stuff going on, what with the capers and eggs and shallots, to make up for the beef's lack of, uh, beefiness.

Edited by eunny jang (log)
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having recently re-partaked of bistro francais' version, i can definitely attest to its status as the paragon of raw ruminants seasoned liberally with mustard and other delectables. washed down with a bottle of gigondas: raw meat and velvety red wine, what's not to like?

like malawry, i do share the belief in its inherent richness and thus, it was shared. for the sybaritic and indulgent out there though, this would make a very appropiate and delicious meal.

The tartare at The Guards is made fresh for each order. Those at BdC and Bistro Français are good, but seem to be made ahead of time.

Mark

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They make it fresh table-side at Les Halles and it is quite good. However, they ask you what you want in it and how much of each ingredient. This is problematic if you don't know the correct proportions. I once 'made' one that had way too much mustard. Now I just ask them to make it as they see fit.

having recently re-partaked of bistro francais' version, i can definitely attest to its status as the paragon of raw ruminants seasoned liberally with mustard and other delectables. washed down with a bottle of gigondas: raw meat and velvety red wine, what's not to like?

like malawry, i do share the belief in its inherent richness and thus, it was shared. for the sybaritic and indulgent out there though, this would make a very appropiate and delicious meal.

The tartare at The Guards is made fresh for each order. Those at BdC and Bistro Français are good, but seem to be made ahead of time.

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Wait a sec, why do I like kitfo and not beef tartare?  :unsure:

I am planning to give BdC's version a try.

Edit, on second thought frogprince's description below makes me think that BF might be the place.

Now I'm curious. What do you mean by beef tartare? Initially I assumed raw beef dishes in general. Now I'm not sure.

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No. Carpaccio is raw beef but by no means steak tartare. Steak tartare is gound/chooped beef with a raw egg, mustard, spices, etc.

Wait a sec, why do I like kitfo and not beef tartare?   :unsure:

I am planning to give BdC's version a try.

Edit, on second thought frogprince's description below makes me think that BF might be the place.

Now I'm curious. What do you mean by beef tartare? Initially I assumed raw beef dishes in general. Now I'm not sure.

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"More than a month later, I found myself at Circle Bistro again, eating a sublime beef tartare shocked with capers and pickle juice and presented with a cone of delicate, house-made potato chips. No wonder this classic endures. "

--Tom Sietsema

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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"More than a month later, I found myself at Circle Bistro again, eating a sublime beef tartare shocked with capers and pickle juice and presented with a cone of delicate, house-made potato chips. No wonder this classic endures. "

--Tom Sietsema

OK, one more place on the list.

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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"More than a month later, I found myself at Circle Bistro again, eating a sublime beef tartare shocked with capers and pickle juice and presented with a cone of delicate, house-made potato chips. No wonder this classic endures. "

--Tom Sietsema

How could I forget this one? The tartare at Circle Bistro is first rate.

Mark

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No.  Carpaccio is raw beef but by no means steak tartare.  Steak tartare is gound/chooped beef with a raw egg, mustard, spices, etc.
Wait a sec, why do I like kitfo and not beef tartare?  :unsure:

I am planning to give BdC's version a try.

Edit, on second thought frogprince's description below makes me think that BF might be the place.

Now I'm curious. What do you mean by beef tartare? Initially I assumed raw beef dishes in general. Now I'm not sure.

The thread started off with "beef tartare" not steak tartare. Nonetheless given how culinary terms are chopped up or ground up in the Anglo-American world of menu writing I was uncertain as to what the initial poster meant.

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I had a very good steak tartare last night at the bar at Bistro Bis. Nicely garnished with a strong Dijon, frisee, cress, and house-made garlic chips. It was shot through with capers, and cornichons and pearl onions were served on the side.

Edited by banco (log)

Don’t you have a machine that puts food into the mouth and pushes it down?

--Nikita Khrushchev to Richard Nixon during the "Kitchen Debate" in Moscow, 1959

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