Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Favorite Uses for Mayonnaise


NulloModo
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey,

A recent comment in the hot-dog thread combined with some other posts I have read around make me wonder if I don't have some odd views on the use of mayo.

I will come out and admit it, I find mayonaisse to be a wonderful comment suited for just about any and all situations. Hot dog? gotta have some mayo, same with a cheeseburger (or a cheesteak for that matter), or pastrami on rye, or a rueben, peanut butter on toast, or liverwurst and onion. Really, as far I'm concerned there is nothing that mayo doesn't go with. Heck, it is even the perfect topping (along with tons of vinegar) for french fries.

What possibly bizarre and strange uses for mayo do you have? How do you enjoy it most? Do you make it yourself, or are you just as happy with storebrought?

Let the emulsified love-fest flow.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made my own mayo once... sort of a tribute to Julia Child. I even whisked it by hand. Nobody in the house would touch it but me. Taste was OK but not overwhelming considering the effort put in. Maybe kicking it up a notch and turning it into aioli would have made it better.

Anyway, I'm from a Miracle Whip family. Tough to break old habits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What possibly bizarre and strange uses for mayo do you have?  How do you enjoy it most?  Do you make it yourself, or are you just as happy with storebrought?

Of course after making my own, I still find it simpler and just about as close to either Hellman's or Kraft ... once went to a taste testing/market research group on these two types ... came out with a deeper appreciation for Hellman's ...

Low fat mayos and Miracle Whip still verboten in my home ... for obvious reasons ...

Unusual uses? Wasn't there a thing a long time ago about using it as a treatment for dried out hair? :hmmm: but that isn't culinary ... :wink:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hellman's in my house. Even better, my local grocery has started carrying the Hellman's Mayonessa which is made with lime juice. I rarely make my own. I also admit to preferring mayo over mustard on hot dogs (the dog must be burnt) and cheeseburgers. The one habit that I picked up in the Netherlands is french fries dipped in mayo. That raises some eyebrows. But, they have these wonderful stands for "frites" and this lovely mayonaise that is somehow lighter and often carries some flavoring, like Sambal, my favorite. I am told that the stuff they serve is a Belgian style mayonaise. I would like to learn how to make that.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Hellman's for anything I need mayonnaise for. I will make a special trip to the store for it to avoid using anything else.

I have never liked mayonnaise as a condiment, only as a salad dressing for tuna, chicken and potato salads etc...

If you can't act fit to eat like folks, you can just set here and eat in the kitchen - Calpurnia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Miracle Whip for many things (tuna salad, pasta or potato salads, etc.) although I will use mayo and lemon in a pinch; I think mayo tastes greasy without that lemon in most applications. BUT mayo on fries is a very good thing, and a Clubhouse needs mayo on the toast, not Miracle Whip.

I really rue the day I read the Miracle Whip label, though.

Hellman's over Kraft.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like both Miracle Whip and Hellman's, on different foods.

I prefer the tang of Miracle Whip in chicken salad, tuna salad, and sandwiches etc. but there's no substitute for mayonnaise on burgers, fries, and baked salmon.

edit: I've made aioli several times, but I'm too lazy to make it on a regular basis. I have both Miracle Whip and Hellman's in the fridge.

Edited by Ling (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to be a Hellman's-only kind of gal, but we've switching to the Whole Foods 365 brand mayo. I'm just too freaked out by the thought of non-organic eggs. And the 365 brand uses canola, which is nice.

No one in my family has noticed the difference. We mostly use it for egg salad, chicken salad, potato salad, etc.

Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm taking down the names of everyone who admits to using Miracle Whip and will use it against you some where down the line....

We do homemade if it's for something special -- cumin/lime mayo for pork sandwiches, something resembling aioli for shrimp -- but otherwise we "bring out the Hellman's and bring out the best."

Miracle whip (mutters to himself...).

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I meant no disrespect in the hot dog thread, just a gentle jest. Food (like art, wine, music, and stereo equipment) is thoroughly subjective. If you like it, it's good!

I tend to be old fashioned though, with respect to condiment usage. What to me is kosher deli stuff (beef dogs, knockwurst, corned beef, pastrami) I like with mustard. I guess this tradition stems from real kosher delis that would not have mayonaise on the premises. I prefer mayonaise on turkey or roast beef sandwiches (actually both mayo and mustard together on the roast beef is good, horseradish essential), can go either way on burgers.

As for making it, I agree with previous posts. I have made it, but been underwhelmed with the results, probably a personal problem or lack of practice. For brands, I'm partial to Hellman's over Kraft. Wife likes Duke's, but she's a true southerner, I think that helps you to be a Duke's fan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One fact about Mayonnaise that I remember from a colleg emarketing class is that brand loyalty for Mayonnaise is higher than for any other consumer product - something like 97 or 98 percent.

In other words - if you like one brand you most likely won't be switching any time soon.

I'm a Hellman's man myself.

Bill Russell

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am more loyal to Hellman's than I am to any other brand and have been so since I was an adolescent.

I like mayo in some unorthodox scenarios as well. On hot dogs, hamburgers, fries. Mixed with BBQ sauce, sf honey/mustard, ketchup, lemon pepper, blue cheese, garlic/sour cream, you name it.

I'm also partial to a liberal smear of mayo on a piece of bread then cheese on that and then a trip to the broiler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One fact about Mayonnaise that I remember from a colleg emarketing class is that brand loyalty for Mayonnaise is higher than for any other consumer product - something like 97 or 98 percent.

You know, I have never really thought about it, but that must be true. I don't really care what type of ketchup or generic yellow mustard I use, but I do care about the mayonnaise.

Perhaps it is because a lot of the salad-type dishes are so time consuming and sometimes expensive to make, we want only what we periceve to be "the best".

If you can't act fit to eat like folks, you can just set here and eat in the kitchen - Calpurnia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A generous schmeer of Hellmann's on the outside of a Swiss on rye, then into the frying pan for a great grilled cheese. Hellmann's mixed with onions, a bit of lemon juice, a little dash of water for texture, some garlic, a dab of horseradish and s&p is a great dip for shrimp, and Hellmann's 1:1 with seedless raspberry jam and a slug of decent mustard goes great on leftover roast chicken breast! :wub: Oh, yeah, almost forgot: fresh warm tomatoes out of the garden, sliced, with Hellmann's and sugar :wub::wub: !

Edited because I forgot the tomatoes, and my grandfather would never forgive me!

Edited by judiu (log)

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the rare chance we use commercial mayo it's Hellman's. But it's just so easy to make it homemade that I rarely buy it. Right now we're on a chipotle mayo kick. It's great with smoked meats.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hellman's here too, unless we want aioli or some other mayonnaise type dip - then it's homemade. Mayonnaise with fries - definitely - and for my favourite fat-fest, bacon & brie sandwiches with Hellman's on both pieces of lightly toasted bread, . If I want to pretend there's a vegetable in there, I'll add some iceberg lettuce.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If purchasing mayo, I always buy Helllmans (on the west coast, it is the same stuff but called "Best Foods").

I like to make mayo for certain apps; like if I want aioli or some other flavored mayo.

One other favorite is to make a Southern Mayonnaise using cider vinegar and flavoring with cayenne pepper. This is great on freshly sliced tomatoes in the summer.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, I wouldn't have thought I was in the minority here. I make my own. In a blender, there's nothing to it. The only downside being that I end up with a cup of mayo I need to use for something. (Any suggestions welcome, BTW...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the loyalty comment about mayo is spot on. I bought a big jar of Acme brand mayo a bit ago because it was cheap, and wow, the stuff just seemed vile. I am also not a huge fan of miracle whip, it just tastes disgustingly sweet to me.

Oh, how could I have forgotten about club sandwhiches, truly, they must be thickly slathered. BMLTs as well, Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato, and enough mayo to make it a named ingredient.

I am curious what else everyone uses mayo on, the texture, the taste, the richness, just seems such a perfect addition to so many things. I saw a recipe for a 'mayo cake' a bit ago, and honestly, I have to say that I never thought about using mayo in sweet baked goods before, but people seem to be raving over it. Then again, eggs, oil, and salt usually go into baked goods so it isn't that much of a stretch...

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the rare chance we use commercial mayo it's Hellman's.  But it's just so easy to make it homemade that I rarely buy it.  Right now we're on a chipotle mayo kick.  It's great with smoked meats.

So, how long does homemade mayo last?

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I make mayo at least once a week. It is great with asparagus, cold meats, leftover fish, etc, etc. It is so easy and fast to make in small amounts by hand (1 egg yolk, 2/3 cups of oil), just a couple of minutes. Much faster than cleaning the blender. It lasts for several days, specially if made with grapeseed oil. Otherwise it tends to seperate when cold.

Strange, I thought most people on eGullet would make there own mayo...

In a tomato sandwich, I admit that I prefer Helman's.

Edited by francois (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a mayo fanatic.

I'm a Hellmann's man.

I've made homemade mayo a bunch of times and I must say that I prefer Hellmann's. I usually do homemade just because I'm out of Hellmann's.

Hellmann's plus dried garlic powder equals an aioli that is -- in my opinion -- superior to a more traditional one. Absolutely spectacular with fries or hot potato chips.

Mayo on hot dogs? Yes (esp. with 50/50 dijon mustard) Mayo on burgers? A resounding HELL yes. Slather the bottom bun good to combine with the burger juices for a spectacular sauce. Any mayo-based dip is great.

Mayo! :wub::wub::wub:

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By SobaAddict70
      I LOVE pickled ginger. In fact, in some instances, moreso than sushi or sashimi itself. When I was first introduced to sushi, it was my least favorite part of a sushi meal. Now it's the opposite.
      Besides sushi/sashimi, what other uses for pickled ginger are there? And how do you make your own? What goes in the pickling solution? Fresh pickled ginger (not premade) is undyed and a pale beige in color, whereas the premade version is a slight tawny pink.
      Any suggestions?
      Soba
    • By Smarmotron
      What sorts of mustards do you like? The type of mustard I like is pungent without a hint of sweetness (fie upon honey mustards), but not too vinegary. Inglehoffer's Stone Ground tends to be rather good, but it's got a little too much vinegar (overpowers the taste of the mustard). What sorts of mustards do you like? Any brands? Or do you make your own?
    • By Eldictator
      Any ideas on how I could put a honey centre in a jelly pastille
    • By Keith Orr
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce (Habenero Hot Sauce)
      I thought I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR called Secret Aardvark Sauce.
      Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce
      1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes or roasted tomatoes chopped - include the juice
      1 – 14.5 oz of rice wine vinegar. Use the now empty tomato can to measure
      1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup)
      1 cup of finely diced white onion
      1/4 cup of yellow mustard
      1/3 cup of sugar
      2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt
      1 teaspoon of black pepper
      13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habaneros before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes)
      2 teaspoons curry powder
      1 cup of water when cooking
      5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it
      Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours  Note: I used the crockpot so I don't have to worry about scorching it while it cooks. 
      Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky.
      Makes 3 pints - To can process pint jars in a water bath canner for 15 minutes
      I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet.
       
      Edited for clarity on 11/9/2020
       
      Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Carribean, Condiment, Sauce, Easy, Food Processor
      ( RG2003 )
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...