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torakris

Daifuku the topic!

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Yesterday as I was waiting in line at the supermarket, they was a shelf full of various wagashi for sale right next to me. The ume (Japanese plum) daifuku caught my eye and made its way into my basket. This was incredible, the soft slighty sweet mochi like coating filled with a green plum that had been cooked in some kind of sugar syrup. The sweet and sour contrast combined with the soft and crunchy contrast, what more could a girl ask for? :wub:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Was it maybe an ume that had been used to make ume-shu or ume-jiru? I LOVE those! I'm thinking of making ume-shu again this year even though we don't have space, just so I can have some of those ume next year.

I've tried all sorts of daifuku, like strawberry, coffee, chocolate etc. Some are good, but my favourite is a plain old white one with koshi-an, covered in sesame seeds. You know, the kind you can find at any conbini.


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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I am planning to make umeshu this year too! I think I am going to do it this weekend.

This was a very ineresting ume, it was the green type they use for umeshu but it wasn't crunchy and it was actually coated with a sugary-syrupy glaze (the ume on the inside that is). It had that great ume flavor that you get from the umeshu umes.

Cafe au lait daifuku are my all time favorite, but this ume one is now running a very close second.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I bought another one of those ume daifuku today, I am addicted!

I paid closer attention this time the outside is light green mochi with a faint ume taste inside is shiro an (white anko) and then in the middle is a whole green ume probably simmered in sugar syrup until soft.

Wonderful :wub:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I have really been into daifuku recently. Yesterday I picked up two budo-daifuku (grape) for my husband and I but they were so good I ate them both before you came home! :biggrin:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I went to the store yesterday to get an ume daifuku fix and silly me, it is now autumn and ume are a thing of summer! :shock:

I picked up instead a kuri daifuku (chestnut) and was very disappointed, the chestnut was very dry and had no flavor to speak of, the whole thing was bland bland bland :sad:

I want my ume daifuku back!


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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had the first ichigo (strawberrry) daifuku of the season and was slighly disappointed because it was filled with just anko, no fresh cream.

I really like the ones that have fresh cream inside...... :sad:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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On my neverending quest for the perfect daifuku :biggrin: I have stumbled across this one:

i8146.jpg

i8145.jpg

This is made with a young green peach as well as shiro-an and fresh cream, it was wonderful!!

:biggrin:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I love how the daifuku change with the seasons..... :biggrin:

I just picked up a budou (grape) daifuku, I should have picked up 10....

i11244.jpg


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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that looks like a fat concord grape stuck in there... i wish i had a local wagashi shop here...


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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Why don't you start one?!

Seriously, there's an application for the "wetter" wagashi style in western eating, I think. I got quite passionate about making some types of wagashi about 20 years ago, when I went to Kyoto regularly. I think the techniques would be very applicable to all sorts of western materials.

However, I admit I don't share Torakris' fondness for fruit daifuku! I almost always feel that the sweet "an" has caused the fruit to start fermenting...

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Does anyone have the recipe for that lovely juicy budou daifuku I see there?

And I 'd like the recipe for the mizu manjyuu too. They both look so good!

I was manju obssessed in Japan and had manjyuus everyday. In my area (gifu-ken), Nerikiri is the most well-known. It's lovely ,tasty and really pretty!

For Nerikiri's picture and recipe, go to : Bob's Manjyuu Place

They have other manjyuu recipes too. All in Japanese though.

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yunnermeier, welcome to egullet and the Japan forum! :biggrin:

Wagashi are something I have never really wanted to try to make, they are so easy to get here in Japan and I never really need more than one.....

If you have ever made daifuku before they are probably the same just made with one gape and shiro-an, maybe someone has a recipe.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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*sob* I'm not in Japan anymore.

At the Jusco in my country, we can find Dorayakis (icky ones though) and occasionally um.. not sure what they're called. I just call them manjyuu(just mochi and anko).

Somehow your ume daifuku and budou daifuku looks... I don't know.. flavoured. Like as if the koshian was.. injected with grape/plum flavour? :-p

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Somehow your ume daifuku and budou daifuku looks... I don't know.. flavoured. Like as if the koshian was.. injected with grape/plum flavour? :-p

I don't know if the shiro-an is actually flavored or not, but it does have the taste of the fruit, maybe the flavor just seeps in...? The mochi outer part on some of them, like the ume one, is definitely flavored.

I just love the fruitiness with the an, I will be going back for a budou one today! :biggrin:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I just call them manjyuu(just mochi and anko)

I think that is a basic daifuku-mochi - the ones with fresh fruit in the middle are a subset/variation!

You can grill daifuku-mochi or eat them plain.

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In my search of all the daifukus that Japan has to offer :biggrin: , I found this

gallery_6134_91_1097637053.jpg

purin daifuku, for those unfamiliar with purin it is a Japanese take on a flan and somehow they got this into a daifuku. :blink:

I am not a huge fan of purin and didn't care for this one but not because of the purin rather the outer mochi part had a really gummy and raw taste.....


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Im a little confused here... Is Daifuku stuffed mochi?? or are they 2 very different things? And..... are Daifuku always sweet?

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Instead of hijacking the wagashi thread with all of my daifuku talk I decided to move all of the daifuku talk to its own thread! :biggrin: thus the new daifuku thread....

My latest daifuku

gallery_6134_184_1097883730.jpg

kuri (chestnut) daifuku, a thousand times better than the one I found last year. The mochi is perfect and slightly flavored with kuri, inside is fresh cream, a soft paste of kuri and a whole candied kuri....

I WILL be going back for more... :biggrin:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Sounds much more expensive than regular ones...

I got it on sale for 140 yen ($1.28) but the regular price on it was 189 yen ($1.72), so it is a little more expensive than a reular daifuku that I normally get in the 100 ~120 yen range ($.91 ~ $1.09).


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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my latest purchase

gallery_6134_91_1103607216.jpg

cafe au lait daifuku

this isn't the one I usually buy, but was a small version that I actually bought frozen. It wasn't bad but wasn't nearly as good as a fresh one, you can see the cream in the middle looks sort of curdled...


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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