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Making Your Own Condiments


markovitch
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A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good.

has anyone made their own condiments before?

care to share experiences?

Edited by Smithy
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I've made chutneys and pickles, but never mustard. However, I'm interested to try. Any tips or wisdom that you have to share would be appreciated

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I play around with chutneys and pickles quite a bit. Right now I have some strawberry-pineapple "chutney" I kind of made up that I'm eating with everything from pork chops to toast and cream cheese.

I also usually make my own mayonnaise, though I keep some Best Foods around for emergencies. I don't think I've ever made mustard, though. Care to share the Kabocha squash recipe?

Cheers,

Squeat

Edit: Jinx, jsolomon!

Edited by Squeat Mungry (log)
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the kabocha squash mustard:

1/4 c. black mustard seeds (you could use white, or a mix, etc.)

1 kabocha squash

1/4 c rice wine vinegar

2 c. grated fresh horseradish <--- to taste! my first batch was too strong

1/4 lb silken tofu (1/4 of the standard block)

a little tumeric

3 cloves garlic, minced

Halve squash and bake it

combine:

grated horseradish,

minced garlic

tumeric

vinegar

toast the mustard seeds then grind them in a mortar and pestle. I didn't completely pummel them, i left it a little chunky for that 'whole grain' texture

remove the baked squash, remove the skin and place in food processor with tofu and mustard seeds.

add the horseradish to the mixture and blend a little more to thoroughly mix the ingredients.

done!

how does one chutney something? if chutney isnt a verb, it should be.

peace

Edited by markovitch (log)

"The Internet is just a world passing around notes in a classroom."

---John Stewart

my blog

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I make my own jams, but not any other condiments. I hope you will all inspire me to try some of these other items though. I plan to start with horseradish, which is why I started that thread. :biggrin:

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Thanks -- sounds interesting. I just realized I've never made anything with tofu before!

As far as 'chutneying' something: I'm certainly not an expert, but my understanding is that a true chutney (as in Indian cuisine) is a fresh paste made from a combination of any of a broad range of ingredients like fresh ginger, mint, tangy fruits, mango, coconut, coriander, etc.

Western 'chutneys' like my strawberry-pineapple thingy are, I think, usually cooked with vinegar, sugar and other spices. At least that's what I do. I can't really give a recipe because I just kind of play around with flavors and spices until I find something I like.

Maybe somebody with a real understanding of chutney can help us out, and I can stop talking through my hat here? :raz:

Cheers,

Squeat

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I make my own jams, but not any other condiments. I hope you will all inspire me to try some of these other items though. I plan to start with horseradish, which is why I started that thread. :biggrin:

I haven't seen the horseradish thread, but the horseradish I made last fall was superb, and dead easy.

I just took fresh horseradish that had been frozen in the ground, peeled and washed it. Ground it twice through a meat grinder with the smallest die possible, then covered with white vinegar.

Yum, yum, yum.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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As far as 'chutneying' something: I'm certainly not an expert, but my understanding is that a true chutney (as in Indian cuisine) is a fresh paste made from a combination of any of a broad range of ingredients like fresh ginger, mint, tangy fruits, mango, coconut, coriander, etc.

I'd always thought chutney was a Raj thing ... now I'm curious. I'll have to go fire up Google.

I've made chutneys too but no one else in the house will eat them (their lack of taste, not the chutneys').

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I wept. And wept. And wept.

Then, I was stupid enough to take a whiff down close after I had added the vinegar.

The floodgates opened.

But, it took all of 20 minutes from soup to nuts.

However, the horseradish had been allowed to thaw. I've heard that allowing it to freeze in the ground enhances its flavor (from my great-grandfather)

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I wept. And wept. And wept.

Then, I was stupid enough to take a whiff down close after I had added the vinegar.

The floodgates opened.

Greaaaaaat. I cry easily when onions are cut, which makes me look like a chump-ass at work. Last night I cried three rooms away when my roommate was cutting onions in the kitchen!

Didja make it in a food processor? That's how my grandmother used to do it.

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Thanks -- sounds interesting. I just realized I've never made anything with tofu before!

tofu gets an undeservedly bad reputation, it is amazingly useful in many different ways. silken tofu makes a great substitute for heavy cream in almost all cases. its a hell of alot better for you too

"The Internet is just a world passing around notes in a classroom."

---John Stewart

my blog

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I was at home over the holidays one year, burning off excessive vacation time. the weather was horrible and I was bored. While reading through my favorite Emeril book, Louisiana Real and Rustic, I ran across his recipe for Worchestershire Sauce. Boy, was that intriguing. I went running around gathering the ingredients and got it started. The hardest thing to find was the fresh horseradish. This was one of those lengthy "projects" that I really love. The whole house smelled like Lea & Perrins. I lovingly put up small jars and gave some to family and friends. Everyone (including me) remarked that it tasted just like Lea & Perrins. :laugh::laugh::laugh:

I do make up a variety of chile pastes and other Mexican sauces to keep on hand. My sister is the jelly and jam maker and I help pick but let her take care of the actual making.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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In late spring, I put up two dozen pints of raspberry preserves from my garden patch. In late summer, early fall, I do as many pints in tomato ketchup, tomato chutney, (I also roast and freeze a ton of romas) pickled hot peppers, pickled cukes (some with ground mustard, which are my favorites) and horseradish.

My friends all think this is very quaint, canning food. I think it is a major enjoyment in my life that gives me satisfaction for the whole year.

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  • 2 months later...

I spent part of the morning mixing, blending and processing mustard seed into the base product that I will later "flavor" with various ingredients, then put up in jars and finish in a hot water bath.

I have been making my own mustard for many years, it is really quite a simple process and I can have the flavors I want. It also makes a nice gift for a hostess or an addition to a holiday (or other occasion) gift basket.

This mustard happens to be home grown, but mustard seed is readily available and I wondered why more people don't make their own, instead of paying some of the outrageous prices for some of the "trendy" mustards.

I took a couple of photos, but ImageGullet is not available at this time so can't post them.

Have you made mustard, either from mustard flour, or starting with seeds and if so, how did your product turn out and what varieties have you made?

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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MASTER MUSTARD RECIPE

an Original Recipe by Andie

First let me say that I grow my own mustard because I like to, however it is not necessary. You can find whole black and brown and white or yellow mustard seed in any Indian market and there are plenty around so you should have no difficulty finding a source.

This is the basic mustard recipe I use - it is easy to adjust it for your taste and

add various spices, herbs, condiments that make it to your taste. I use mostly black and brown mustard, however a yellow or white variety has crept into my mustard patch in the last few years and it now makes up about 5% of the total. (I am not going to pick them out one by one.)

I do not use honey because one my friends has a severe allergy to honey or something in honey - so I use apple jelly for the basic sweetener in sweet/hot mustard, or half apple jelly and half orange marmalade, or whatever.

This is for a coarse, homestyle type mustard which will not be creamy.

Measure out 2/3 cup of the mustard seeds, dump them into a fairly fine wire strainer and shake to get rid of any bits of stem or hull that has not been removed in the threshing. Rinse with cold water and leave to drain in the strainer.

In a glass jar with tight fitting lid place the following

1/2 cup apple cider or rice vinegar (seasoned or unseasoned).

1/2 cup sweet mirin or any sweet white wine.

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon sugar - brown or white

Add the mustard seed, close tightly and shake briefly

Set aside and allow to soak overnight or at least for 8 hours, (you can leave it for days or even weeks, the seeds will not spoil, they will just get softer)

If you are around, shake the jar a couple of times in the interval or stir it with a long handled spoon but if you don’t think of it don’t worry it is not absolutely necessary.

Pour into blender and start on low speed, gradually increasing speed as the seeds break up. The mustard will begin to thicken, stop after a few minutes and stir to check on consistency, you may have to add a bit of water if it becomes too thick. (If the seeds have taken up all the moisture then you will have to add some liquid.)

When the mixture just begins to hold its shape, stop blending and add 1 cup of either apple jelly, orange marmalade, red currant jelly, apricot jam - or a mixture of any or all.

Continue blending until you can no longer see any whole seeds in the mix.

Pour into a glass jar, cap tightly and refrigerate for a day or so the mustard can mature and mellow a bit.

At this point this is going to be a fairly hot, sinus-clearing mustard.

The mixture will thicken a little but should still be somewhat runny and will have a sharp bite. (tastes a bit "raw")

THE NEXT STEP IS IMPORTANT!

At this point it has to be cooked a bit to modify the flavor, reduce the "bite". You can cook it in the top of a double boiler over barely simmering water until it thickens to spreadable consistency.

OR

You can do it in the microwave in just a minute or two.

In a wide bowl or casserole dish, which will allow the mustard to foam up 3 times its depth without going over the sides, pour the mustard so it is about 3/4 inch deep.

At 50% power, nuke it for 20 seconds- stir, repeat the 20 second cook, stir

again and repeat.......

This should take a total of perhaps 2 minutes (at most) cooking time.

As you stir the mustard back down after it has foamed up, you will begin to notice that it is thicker and has begun to look slightly translucent and shiny.

At this point let it cool and taste it. Some of the harsh bite should be gone but you should still be able to taste the spiciness.

MOST IMPORTANT! This is the way to adjust the taste of the mustard. If you cook it too long the flavor will be gone. If you plan to add anything to it, such as mayonnaise, or mix it into sour cream or cream cheese or ??? leave it a bit spicer than you would if using it straight. The additive will lessen the pungency of the mustard and you will lose the "bite" of the mustard.

Put the finished mustard back in the (washed and scalded) jar, cap tightly and store in fridge.

Now you have a basic mustard to which you can add green peppercorns or horseradish, or cranberry relish, or chutney, hot peppers, etc. If you have an Asian market buy some of the sweet chile sauce (Mae Ploy is my favorite brand), which is not too hot and add some of this for a little different flavor, absolutely fantastic with pork or sausages such as bratwurst.

You can mix it half and half with sour cream, mayonnaise or Miracle Whip for a mustard dip. Try it with veggies, with fried or grilled chicken strips.

If you mix it with tartar sauce it makes a great dip for deep-fried crab balls.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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What a post - thank you.

Do you always make the sweet-hot style or do you sometimes do the savory type? My husband brought me a jar of a German green herb mustard from a trip to Europe and I ate it on everything. I have not seen it here and making my own had never occurred to me.

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The base is always a bit sweet. That helps in the cooking to adjust the amount of bite in the mustard.

The sweetness then can be tempered by adding other flavors. Capers or caperberries, some of the bitter herbs, horseradish, etc., I also add citrus zest or candied peel, chiles, ginger, garlic roasted in oil, carmelized onions. I have made mustard with stout, for a friend who likes it made that way.

The possible variations are endless.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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carmelized onions.

It's nice to know that there is another enlightened soul who uses caramelised onions in homemade mustard. :rolleyes:

I love the flavor of carmelized onions, shallots, garlic, etc., etc.

The flavor of oil roasted garlic is also wonderful. I am reluctant to take a chance on cold infused oil because of botulism so I roast garlic in a large glass Dutch oven in a slow oven for a long period. The garlic carmelizes in the oil, flavors the oil which can be bottled and sealed and doesn't need refrigeration. The garlic itself is canned in just enough oil to cover and it also makes great gifts.

My kitchen is redolent of garlic until the exhaust system is able to filter it out, however I love it so no complaints from me.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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So, Episure,

What kind of mustard do you make?

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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