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Making Your Own Condiments


markovitch
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What a brilliant idea.  I will be trying to make a batch of mustard soon.

Jmahl

Well soon - turned into almost a year and a half. Just made my first batch of mustard. I will report back on how it turns out. Looks good right now.

Just noted - this is my 600th post.

Jmahl

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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Congratulations, Jmahl!

Better late than never.

What type of mustard seed are you using?

I heard a few months ago about RED mustard seed and have been trying to find a vendor who has a supply that doesn't originate in China.

It is supposed to be much hotter and more pungent than the black or brown varieties so it intrigues me.

I wonder if anyone else has heard of it or has even used it.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Andi,I was not reading this thread all along, but found your recipe/method, in a site search.

I made a batch 4 or 5 months ago and it was a magnum opus recipe!!!!I had been trying to make edible mustard since the early 80's and had given up....Thanks for "THE" mustard recipe...Great work...Thanks!!!

Bud

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thank you for this great topic-- I am definitely planning to make some mustard. For now, I had a bee in my bonnet to make ketchup. I used the David Page and Barbara Shin recipe from "Recipes from Home"; this recipe was also published in Fine Cooking volume 16, and is available in PDF format if you subscribe to the website.

This recipe is amazing-- the spice list is longer than your average curry. It starts with charred onions, which my husband did on the grill:

gallery_9502_6682_6654.jpg

Here is the mise en place:

gallery_9502_6682_4951.jpg

And a closeup on the spices, with a brown sugar castle in the middle.

gallery_9502_6682_30282.jpg

The ketchup thickened readily, so I only simmered it for 2 hours instead of three. Holy cats, but this stuff splatters-- I think it could be used to train volcanologists in working with magma.

The ketchup is deliciously spicy, but a little harsh-- I suspect that, like pickles, the flavors will blend and mellow over time. Here is one of my little beauties:

gallery_9502_6682_2426.jpg

I only made a half-recipe, which yielded seven half-pints. We are making hamburgers this weekend with oven-roasted potatoes. I can't wait.

Jen

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Congratulations, Jmahl!

Better late than never.

What type of mustard seed are you using?

I heard a few months ago about RED mustard seed and have been trying to find a vendor who has a supply that doesn't originate in China.

It is supposed to be much hotter and more pungent than the black or brown varieties so it intrigues me.

I wonder if anyone else has heard of it or has even used it.

I used a light seed - results have been very good. I intend to keep trying using various combinations.

Jmahl

The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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Has anyone ever tried making their own Worcester(shire) Sauce ? I have a recipe from 1870 that I have been meaning to try for ages. Maybe I should shut-up thinking about it and get on with it!

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Erm. Worcestershire sauce. I've made some modifications since posting that recipe, and I'm happy to discuss.

Sounds fantastic, and a whole lot better than the 19th C version.

Thanks!

Janet

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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I have a double batch of Andi's master mustard waiting patiently for completion. I know that some will get spiked with Mae Ploy sweet chili sauce, as Andi suggested. If I add horseradish, should I grate some fresh or would bottled (and drained?) be an acceptable alternative. Tarragon or other fresh herbs to taste for another batch? I also bought several habaneros but am not sure how much or how little to add...anyone have experience adding hot pepper to mustaard? Thanks.

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Love this topic. Here's a mustard that I make using a local craft stout beer that is outstanding. You could use Guinness, but a more full-flavored stout works best.

Saint Arnold Spicy Stout Mustard

Makes 3 1/2 cups

1 12-oz. bottle Saint Arnold Winter Stout

1 1⁄2 cups brown mustard seeds (10 oz.)

1 cup red wine vinegar

1 tbsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

1⁄4 tsp. ground cinnamon

1⁄4 tsp. ground cloves

1⁄4 tsp. ground nutmeg

1⁄4 tsp. ground allspice

1. Combine ingredients in a nonreactive mixing bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 1–2 days so that the mustard seeds soften and the flavors meld.

2. Transfer the mixture to the bowl of a food processor and process, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, until the seeds are coarsely ground and the mixture thickens, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a jar and cover.

3. Refrigerate overnight and use immediately or refrigerate for up to 6 months.

It goes great, of course, with brats and beers!

Edited by franktex (log)

Frank in Austin

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I have a double batch of Andi's master mustard waiting patiently for completion. I know that some will get spiked with Mae Ploy sweet chili sauce, as Andi suggested. If I add horseradish, should I grate some fresh or would bottled (and drained?) be an acceptable alternative. Tarragon or other fresh herbs to taste for another batch? I also bought several habaneros but am not sure how much or how little to add...anyone have experience adding hot pepper to mustaard? Thanks.

Use the bottled and drained horseradish.

Use of the habaneros can be dicey :rolleyes: I suggest you chop them very fine - remove the seeds and the ribs and the top 1/4 where the heat seems to be concentrated - and add just a small amount at a time.

I have used rocotos (aka manzano) (they have a distinct apple flavor in addition to the pepper) and they have black seeds. They are hotter than serranos, but certainly nowhere near the heat of a Scotch bonnet or habanero.

I checked my notes and I used half of a medium-sized rocoto in a one-quart batch of mustard.

It was very spicy! :blink:

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Erm. Worcestershire sauce. I've made some modifications since posting that recipe, and I'm happy to discuss.

Hi Dave, interesting recipe. I always thought that tamarind was a key element of worcestershire sauce.

Tamarind is traditional; I wouldn't call it essential. The proof is in the making: the linked recipe produces something that is easily recognized as Worcestershire sauce. So I conclude that tamarind is used mostly for its sourness, which in Emeril's original recipe is provided by vinegar (the number one ingredient in most, if not all, commerical Worcestershires) and lemon.

The basics of the sauce, to me, are sharpness (from souring agents), smoky sweetness (from the Steen's syrup) and whatever word you use to describe the flavor that anchovies add. The lemon zest underscores the citrus notes, which along with the Steen's syrup (commercial preparations use molasses) gives this version of the sauce a unique twist.

Having said that, I've been working with tamarind, but haven't nailed the proportions yet.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I use tamarind paste in some of my sambal recipes. Works great and there is less liquid to reduce than when I use vinegar.

Note: Some brands are a bit more tart than others!

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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The February 2009 issue of Saveur magazine had a recipe for worcestershire sauce that contains tamarind concentrate, ginger, cardamom, clove, and cinnamon among other ingredients. I have a batch aging in the refrigerator, so I will let you know how it comes out.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I took a quart of Andie's master mustard to my reunion last weekend. I added the Mae Ploy sheet chili sauce and served t with spicy roasted pork loin and pickled onions. The mustard was completely gone afterwards, and several people siad it was the best they have ever eaten. Thank you, I am a real believer!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have now sampled the Saveur magazine worcestershire sauce and think it's pretty good. However, I think it needs more heat, more anchovy, and maybe a little more sweet. I will tinker a bit, modify with Dave's modification of Emeril's recipe and post. It will take a while.

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  • 1 year later...

Congratulations, Jmahl!

Better late than never.

What type of mustard seed are you using?

I heard a few months ago about RED mustard seed and have been trying to find a vendor who has a supply that doesn't originate in China.

It is supposed to be much hotter and more pungent than the black or brown varieties so it intrigues me.

I wonder if anyone else has heard of it or has even used it.

Do you know if there is a similar difference between the black/brown/yellow seeds? Would one type of seed be better for a hotter mustard and a different one better for a sweet mustard?

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  • 3 years later...

DSC_0004_zpsb5fc04b4.jpg

 

My first batch of mustard: a riff on the whole grain Guinness mustard from Currence's Pickles, Pigs and Whiskey. I traded the Guinness for some homebrewed wheat beer and swapped the small pinch of cayenne for a larger quantity of chipotle powder. 

  • Like 4

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Not sure whether this will be of interest, but AFAICT no one in the thread has posted a recipe for regular ol’ dijon-style mustard.  Here’s mine.  It’s not nearly as clever or exotic as Andie’s recipe, but it’s very easy and beats the socks off the commercial stuff.

 

Combine 4 oz dry mustard powder (113 g) and 2 tbsp pulverized brown mustard seeds (24 g).  Gradually stir in 1/2 c each water and dry white wine (120 g each); let stand 15 minutes (45 minutes for a milder mustard).  Stir in 1/4 c white wine vinegar (60 g) and 1 tsp salt (6 g).  Bring just to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes, stirring constantly; let cool covered.  Store chilled.  Makes about 2 c.

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How long do you expect the vins will have to sit before testing, Chris? You will report on the results in good time, please?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'm not really sure. I've never made any kind of vinegar.

 

I followed this recipe to make the pepper vinegar, although I used white vinegar instead of white wine vin. It seemed truer to what I've heard pepper vin described as: a product based on white vin, cider vin or malt vin. I figured 'flavour neutral'--acidity plus peppers, naught else--was the way to go. I'll taste it in a fortnight or so. 

 

I followed this recipe to make beer vinegar, albeit at a lower volume. It's warm here, obviously, so I'll taste it in a month or two and see how it's trucking along. I'm also not sure if working with smaller volumes speeds up the process at all. I'd assume not.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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