Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
cjsadler

Ray's the Steaks

Recommended Posts

(unless it's a Flintstones-style Brontosaurus Standing Rib Roast

You obvioulsy have never been to Ray's the Steaks. Fred's Ribs were modeled after the Ray's signature Cowboy ribeye.

You're right - I haven't. And it's a situation I have every intention of correcting the instant I'm in the District next. :smile:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I'm reading these posts I can't help but think of the difference between the meals I've experianced in Vienna Austria and in DC. You practically have to trip a waiter in Vienna to get their attention and quite frankly if you are in a cafe and would like to linger at your table all day with a line out the door well....that is perfectly fine, and it seems almost expected. It's the difference in the pace of life and customs I guess. Don't mean to throw this off track, Michael can do what ever the heck he wants except cook well done steaks!


Edited by Fred (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always believed in the sincere buying of a drink at the bar for a customer who needs to "give up" the table, not to rush anyone, but be honest about why you need the table, do it in a way that makes the guest feel good about the experience, or simply remove the table from between them if they are really thick.

In regards to the Vienna post...In Europe a diner, especially at a more upscale locale, basicallly purchases their table for the night, a thing as important as a good meal should never be rushed, in turn the tables don't turn, thus a higher pricing point. American restaurants are run differently, especiallly superlative ones with but a handful of tables.


If he is thin, I will probably dine poorly. If he is both thin and sad, the only hope is in flight.”

Fernand Point

Cirrcle Bistro, Potato Peeler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is an art to taking reservations so that the business runs smoothly and the tables are maximized. Seating the entire restaurant at 7:30 makes no sense, even if that is what every customer seems to want. It severely stresses the kitchen and the service staff and the diner suffers the consequences.


Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so excited to go to Ray's for the first time for my husband's birthday tomorrow. He's the one that turned me on to steak in the first place - now I can't get enough of it!

The hubby's been (rightfully) gushing about how much he wants to try it out, and finally we get the chance to go.

I know I'll have the filet, but the hubby's a egullet man as well, and he's got his own menu ideas.

I'll report more Wednesday!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm so excited to go to Ray's for the first time for my husband's birthday tomorrow.  He's the one that turned me on to steak in the first place - now I can't get enough of it!

The hubby's been (rightfully) gushing about how much he wants to try it out, and finally we get the chance to go.

I know I'll have the filet, but the hubby's a egullet man as well, and he's got his own menu ideas.  

I'll report more Wednesday!

I stronly recommend having a half-order of the blackened scallops for an appetizer.

edited to add: And welcome to eGullet ljauss.


Edited by mnebergall (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stronly recommend having a half-order of the blackened scallops for an appetizer.


Edited by ljauss (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm so excited to go to Ray's for the first time for my husband's birthday tomorrow.  He's the one that turned me on to steak in the first place - now I can't get enough of it!

The hubby's been (rightfully) gushing about how much he wants to try it out, and finally we get the chance to go.

I know I'll have the filet, but the hubby's a egullet man as well, and he's got his own menu ideas. 

I'll report more Wednesday!

I stronly recommend having a half-order of the blackened scallops for an appetizer.

edited to add: And welcome to eGullet ljauss.

Thanks - long time listener, first time caller. And hi to my hubby - I'm sure he's reading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think that in a not-so-fine-dining environment it is ok to be up front with customers. a restaurant that is not a 3 hour experience usually has a lower check average and therefore needs to turn over the tables at a faster rate. if people are always calling in for 7-8 o'clock reservations, it might be better to say to the person who wants a 6 or 6.30 reservation, "sorry, all we can accomodate is a 5.30 reservation." if they get pushy and say, "look i need it at 6." then the hostess or host sholuld tactfully explain the situation of how that table as been reserved already for 7.30; and if they really want to come eat at 6 o'clock, and be rushed in and out, they are more than welcome. but it is not something you reccommend. this way it puts the decision on the customer, and makes the restaurant still be upfront..as Rays was doing in the first place.


Nothing quite like a meal with my beautiful wife.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know I'll have the filet, but the hubby's a egullet man as well, and he's got his own menu ideas.  

You might want to consider getting a different cut at Ray's.

The first time we went my wife ordered the filet and, although good, she liked my strip better. The second time we went she ordered the flat-iron and loved it. In fact I liked it better than my strip. It was more flavorful than the filet, but still had that slightly less chewy, filet style texture.

I guess I am saying that if you like a filet, you might REALLY like the flat-iron.

But you can't really go wrong with any beef there. Or the scallops.


Edited by bilrus (log)

Bill Russell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know I'll have the filet, but the hubby's a egullet man as well, and he's got his own menu ideas. 

You might want to consider getting a different cut at Ray's.

The first time we went my wife ordered the filet and, although good, she liked my strip better. The second time we went she ordered the flat-iron and loved it. In fact I liked it better than my strip. It was more flavorful than the filet, but still had that slightly less chewy, filet style texture.

I guess I am saying that if you like a filet, you might REALLY like the flat-iron.

But you can't really go wrong with any beef there. Or the scallops.

You may have sold me on the flat-iron. I tend to be not adventurous with food, but I've been successful of late. I'm not into cuts with a lot of fat on them, just from a texture standpoint. I'll still enjoy this? (I imagine I will)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even though I agree , I still think that any restaurant should have a backup plan just incase.  I mean these are people , not machines , everyone can not eat at the same time , some people eat very slow , some very fast(like myself :rolleyes: ) besides what if someone orders a steak well done ? that will take a lot of time , right ? Im not saying people take extra 20 minutes after dessert with the coffee , but in my opinion a dining experience should be around 2 hours. But a favorite place like Ray`s has a policy , Im up for that too.

The difference between a well-done steak and a medium rare steak (unless it's a Flintstones-style Brontosaurus Standing Rib Roast or it's being cooked over a single lit match) should not be long enough to significantly extend a dining experience to beyond the already adequate 90 minutes. The problem is that the extra twenty to thirty minutes the customers extend the dining experience is inevitably after dinner. If the restaurant screws up and takes too long to get the food to the table then they can't very well expect the customer to be rushed out. THAT would be wrong. Clearly this isn't the case at Ray's. This is a professional operation at every level. The food and service are perfectly paced to stay within their own preferences to maximize their seating capacity. Michael's thoughtful response is further proof that Ray's is operating at the highest level of professionalism. The problem remains that many customers are utterly oblivious to the business needs of the restaurant, and frankly don't care. Restaurants aren't "businesses" - they are places to gather, eat, drink and be merry, regardless of whether it's adversely effecting the business or the other customers. And unfortunately, the adverse effect on the business is two-fold. They'll lose the second seating customer that night and for all eternity as well. Just so folks could linger over dessert. :sad:

I have no problem with at all with Ray's or any restaurant that wants me out by a certain time and tells me up front. My experience at Ray's is that 90 minutes is plenty of time to eat and time well spent.

On the other hand, to suggest that customers are selfish or lazy because they want to linger and talk after a good meal is ridiculous. I don't think it's my job to worry about the business needs of the restaurant any more than I worry about Microsoft's quarterly earnings statement. If a restaurant needs me to leave, they can tell me (up front). Otherwise I might the restaurant so much that I'll linger for a moment, despite what the accounting team thinks is best.

Edited to add: an interesting and worthy topic, here. Should one of the Powers that Be break it into a new thread?


Edited by Busboy (log)

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get this thread up to 20, 000 views by Tuesday.

refresh

refresh again

that's right, view again

and again

It's 20,000 views Tuesdays!


...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know I'll have the filet, but the hubby's a egullet man as well, and he's got his own menu ideas.  

You might want to consider getting a different cut at Ray's.

The first time we went my wife ordered the filet and, although good, she liked my strip better. The second time we went she ordered the flat-iron and loved it. In fact I liked it better than my strip. It was more flavorful than the filet, but still had that slightly less chewy, filet style texture.

I guess I am saying that if you like a filet, you might REALLY like the flat-iron.

But you can't really go wrong with any beef there. Or the scallops.

You may have sold me on the flat-iron. I tend to be not adventurous with food, but I've been successful of late. I'm not into cuts with a lot of fat on them, just from a texture standpoint. I'll still enjoy this? (I imagine I will)

I don't remember any visible fat (aside from the internal fat that makes meat tasty). But my wife consumed most of her steak by herself. Someone else could back me up on this.


Bill Russell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill:

I will back you up on this. Chef Michael will tell you that the best steaks in the house are the "butcher cuts" which include the flat iron and the hanger steaks. On the flavor meter, the filets rank near the bottom. The flat iron and the hanger peg out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Add another vote for the hanger or the flank steak.

Besides, what do you have to lose? If it isn't everything we promise you it is, you'll just have to go back and try the filet!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I'm convinced. I'm gonna go with the flat-iron with garlic and onion, unless another topping pops off the menu at me.

Is it dinner tomorrow yet? It's gonna be a long day at work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hangar steak really is superb, and not the least bit scary.

As for the whole timing/table turning issue... in my opinion, I will do WHATEVER that Michael guy says as long as he keeps cooking unbelievable steak. Such a small price to pay for excellence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My experience at Ray's is that 90 minutes is plenty of time to eat and time well spent. 

I second this. We ate at Ray's for the first time on Sunday. The 90-minute deal was no problem whatsoever. Never once did we feel rushed, ended up waiting a decent (but just right) amount of time between the mains and dessert and still were out of there in 1 hour & 15 minutes.

Of course the food was great and lived up to everything we were expecting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The hangar steak really is superb, and not the least bit scary. 

Sigh, too many choices! I'm just gonna throw darts, since it'll all tase divine, I'm sure. Is it 7 yet?

Seriously though, any other items not to miss?

And since I didn't get a cake, any rec's on the dessert? My fave is chocolate mousse, but it's his birthday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The key-lime pie with its sinfully buttery-crust is quite tasty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second mktye's suggestion on the key lime pie, the best in town. As for topping for your steak, consider the crumbled bleu cheese. If you've never had bleu cheese on steak before, ask for it on the side to see if you like it or not, it really adds another dimension to the flavor of the steak.,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a reservation at Rays in a couple of weeks and I was wondering about corkage fee. Is there one?


Jennifer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Corkage is unlawful in a licensed establishment in VA, unless the party bringing their own is separated from the area where licensed beverages are being served. That said, the list at RTS is awesome and quite reasonable.


Jake Parrott

Ledroit Brands, LLC

Bringing new and rare spirits to Washington DC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Corkage is unlawful in a licensed establishment in VA, unless the party bringing their own is separated from the area where licensed beverages are being served.  That said, the list at RTS is awesome and quite reasonable.

Thanks for the info. Actually, I am going there for an anniversary so I want to bring a bottle of champagne that has some sentimental value. So as good as the bottles on the list at Ray's are, I wanna bring my own.


Jennifer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...