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In search of veggies


mamster
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Just did the cauliflower thing.... fanbloodytastic. It was one of the few veggies I had never considered roasting. It and cabbage. Anybody got any roast cabbage recipes?

'You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.'

- Frank Zappa

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My guess is that a firm, thick-leaved cabbage with a tight head will work best.  Cut it into chunks so that the leaves stay attached to a bit of the stem.  Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and drizzle oil all over, so that most of the leaves get at least a few drops on most leaves.  I bet caraway or cumin seeds would be a good addition.  Cabbage, I suspect, would take less time than cauliflower, at a slightly lower temperature.  Sprinkle some roasted sesame oil over the cabbage just before serving.  I'd be afraid of the leaves burning.  It might be better to par-boil the cut up cabbage until it softens somewhat before roasting, as above, in order to reduce the risk.  Again, I haven't tried this, but that's what I would do.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Speaking of St. Patrick's Day, I recall a tip for making stuffed cabbage I read on a yahoo group freezer food forum: Freeze your head of cabbage instead of boiling!

That is, throw the whole head in there, you don't even have to wrap it since the outermost leaves are usually tossed anyway. About a day before you want to make your stuffed cabbage, remove the head from the freezer, place in bowl to collect drippings and defrost. The leaves will have softened in a way similar to boiling, but you don't have to heat the pot of water and risk scalding yourself.

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some nice trick for roasted veggies: sprinkle them with some vermouth or white wine. I tried it the other day on melange of red peppers, shallots and shiitakes. vermouth definitely adds a flavor, but since the roasting is done on hign temperature, it's not overwhelming as vermouth can be

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I suppose this is a result of the misguided notion that veggies are more nutritious when uncooked.

They are more nutritious when uncooked; cooking breaks down the nutrients in food.

On a more  ominous note, microwaving food apparently does some sinister and unforeseen things to food, according to this link and this one, among many others.

Be afraid, be very afraid.

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franklanguage, can you be more specific?  Can you name some nutrients that are rendered biologically inaccessible through cooking, and which vegetables these nutrients are found in?  Does cooking remove all the nutrients or only some?  Do different cooking methods have different effects?  Are you talking about organic nutrients such as vitamins, inorganic nutrients such as minerals, or both?

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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I haven't seen the book, but I did try her recipe for Roasted Cabbage yesterday for St. Patrick's day.  It was pretty tasty, but was not as good as the Roasted Cauliflower.  If I make it again, I would cut the dill in half, and roast it an additional 5-10 minutes, also maybe experiment with 1/2 butter, 1/2 olive oil instead of all butter.  It turned out better than I expected though, and was nice for a change.

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