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Dutch Ovens


JennyUptown
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You don't "have" to have both, but it's better to have the shape of the pan fit the shape of the meat. So if you are doing a stew, it does not matter. But if you're doing a leg, or elongated roast, or two meats each with a round shape, then oval is an advantage. And many people do with one round oven for everything.

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I agree that Mario has an excellent basic Osso Buco recipe. Isn't the one in the book the same as the one on the Food Network web site?

Here.

That's it exactly. Don't know why I didn't bother to search there except sheer laziness.

As a garlic addict, I also have to throw in some. Will occasionally add some Italian or Anaheim peppers to give it a little kick but not make it too hot.

The book has it served not just with the gremolata, but a really creamy risotto. Personally I find the combination a little too rich and instead serve with some basic wild rice, but to each their own.

If someone writes a book about restaurants and nobody reads it, will it produce a 10 page thread?

Joe W

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. . . (a)s a garlic addict, I also have to throw in some. Will occasionally add some Italian or Anaheim peppers to give it a little kick but not make it too hot.

The book has it served not just with the gremolata, but a really creamy risotto. Personally I find the combination a little too rich and instead serve with some basic wild rice, but to each their own.

It's my understanding (and IIRC, it's what Mario says in the book) that Risotto Milanese is the traditional accompaniment to Osso Buco, but I agree that it's just too much. I prefer noodles or plain rice.

(Also agreed on the garlic. Giving the peppers some thought.)

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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You don't "have" to have both, but it's better to have the shape of the pan fit the shape of the meat. So if you are doing a stew, it does not matter. But if you're doing a leg, or elongated roast, or two meats each with a round shape, then oval is an advantage. And many people do with one round oven for everything.

I use the round pot for things like chili. And the oval for things like corned beef on St. Patrick's Day. If I had to choose one - I'd pick the round. But it's nice to have both. Robyn

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What's the difference between the oval and round? 

Mine is round and I don't get why you need two.

Needs vary. Some may do little or no braising and feel no need for a Dutch oven at all. Others may be professionals who need more than one pot/pan per size and shape . But even home cooks when entertaining or making a complex recipe, etc. may find "duplicate" pots very useful. It all depends on your personal needs. Also LC or copper are attractive enough to serve from at picnics, informal buffets, etc. (which btw I would never do with stainless).

Paradoxically, as my family's grown in size with the addition of DIL's and grandchildren, family dinners mean cooking larger amounts and extra dishes for a vegetarian DIL. I find my need for duplicate pots increasing at the very time I am now living alone and also need more small ones just for myself.

edited to delete duplicate word

Edited by Mottmott (log)

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Somebody upthread asked about Staubs. I have LC, but my mother has a Staub which I greatly enjoy cooking with when I visit her. The lid fits tightly, and it's nice and heavy. Good point somebody made about it not being suited to doing things like making roux, though. I hadn't thought of that. But great for stews and braises.

And a question about the LC dutch ovens - can they be put it the oven? I've never tried it, because I'm afraid that little knob on the top would melt. It sure would be handy if I could do it, though.

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I put my LC in the oven all the time. That little knob is made of a phenolic plastic and is ok to at least 450F.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I agree that Mario has an excellent basic Osso Buco recipe. Isn't the one in the book the same as the one on the Food Network web site?

Here.

That's it exactly. Don't know why I didn't bother to search there except sheer laziness.

As a garlic addict, I also have to throw in some. Will occasionally add some Italian or Anaheim peppers to give it a little kick but not make it too hot.

The book has it served not just with the gremolata, but a really creamy risotto. Personally I find the combination a little too rich and instead serve with some basic wild rice, but to each their own.

I am probably risking my egullet membership by asking this but.....

How is Osso Buco when made with lamb instead of veal?

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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No kidding. Like I don't have enough LC already. Unfortunately (or fortunately for my ragged credit card) the new designs haven't shown up on the US site yet.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Fortunately (or unfortunately) I'm in Paris for a few months, so I can go and buy one....I am just dreading how in the world I will be able to drag it home!!! If I ship it; I'm sure the costs would be horrendous; and I just can't possibly stick it in my suitcase.

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I would seriously consider buying a cheap suitcase just to haul it home. That is what our Latin American friends do that come to Houston a couple of times a year to shop. You see a lot of elegantly turned out ladies with these really cheap-o vinyl suitcases stuffed like mattresses. :biggrin:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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The airlines are really socking it to people these days in terms of extra baggage charges (too many bags - overweight bags - etc.). So I'd check what the story is before arriving at the airport with 200 pounds of LC.

By the way - this thread inspired me to make beef bourguignon this morning. Yum. Robyn

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It seems like Le Creuset fever is going around. I just off the phone with a friend of mine who announced she wants to get the 7 qt like I have. I'm not sure if it was my cooing about the lamb stew I made or the fact that this winter has been calling for long-simmered dishes that did her in.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I spent the afternoon simmering panchetta and fire roasted tomato sauce in mine.

The last time I was in Italy I had to buy another suitcase for the wine we bought. It was well worth the extra expense!

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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It seems like Le Creuset fever is going around. I just off the phone with a friend of mine who announced she wants to get the 7 qt like I have. I'm not sure if it was my cooing about the lamb stew I made or the fact that this winter has been calling for long-simmered dishes that did her in.

I've mentioned it before - but not in this thread. We have a LC factory outlet store near where I live (I95 in St. Augustine Florida). There are some good deals. So if you're passing through - take a look. Robyn

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We have an outlet store at Woodbury Common, which is in Rockland County, NY. But in my experience, the annual Broadway Panhandler sale has the best prices anywhere.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Who knew this was such a cult item.

I just bought a Le Creuset dutch oven too -- French blue, 3 1/2 q., round. I love it. It's just beautiful. I haven't used it yet. Glad I read this thread first, I didn't realize it required seasoning.

I also just learned that it requires special silicone utensils -- are those really necessary??

I haven't been this happy with a piece of kitchen equipment since I splurged on a shiny new copper paella pan two years ago. :wub:

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Seasoning? What seasoning? LC doesn't require seasoning. I think you are confusing LC with unglazed cast iron like Lodge.

The silicone utensils are not required. But stainless utensils will leave metal marks on the glaze. They don't really hurt anything if you don't mind looking at them. I just got tired of cleaning them off so I started using only wood or silicone. I am kinda compulsive about some things. Several of my LC pots are years old and still retain their easy to clean properties even though I did use ss utensils for years.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Could also be that some Le Creuset isn't glazed on the inside. I have a very small dutch-oven-type-thing that's plain cast iron on the inside. I use it for baked beans exclusively -- not sure what it's actual original purpose was.

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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Could also be that some Le Creuset isn't glazed on the inside. I have a very small dutch-oven-type-thing that's plain cast iron on the inside. I use it for baked beans exclusively -- not sure what it's actual original purpose was.

That is pretty wierd. I can't imagine why one would glaze just the OUTSIDE. Can you tell who made it?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Ah! New York I can swing it. Will be in NYC for September on my way home...maybe I can pick one up then....when is the annual sale at the Panhandler?

The annual sale starts about now - February.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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