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cheeseandchocolate

Popovers!

97 posts in this topic

POPOVERS from Melinda Lee

MAKES 6

2 eggs

1 cup, milk

1 cup, sifted flour

1/2 teaspoon, salt

1 tablespoons, melted solid vegetable shortening

additional vegetable shortening for greasing pans/cups

Preheat oven to 475 degrees.

Thoroughly grease interiors of cups in a 6-cup popover pan, a muffin pan, OR 6 oven-proof muffin cups (such as Pyrex cups).

Into a mixing bowl, break eggs, and beat gently.

Add milk, flour and salt.

Beat 1 1/2 minutes,

add melted shortening, and continue beating 1/2 minute more.

Do not overbeat.

Fill cups half full, or slightly more.

Place popover pan, or cups (on a cookie sheet) into preheated oven and bake for 10 minutes at 475 degrees.

Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue baking for 25-30 minutes, until puffed.

DO NOT OPEN OVEN DOOR TO CHECK UNTIL LAST 10 MINUTES OF COOKING.

A few minutes before popovers are golden brown and done, prick each, on one side, with a skewer to allow air and moisture to escape and interior of popover to dry somewhat.

Do you preheat the popover pan, if so when does it go in the oven?

I'd put in the shortening and preheat it while mixing the batter. Wait ten minutes then ladle in the batter

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POPOVERS from Melinda Lee

Thanks for posting the recipe. Your popovers looked great in the pic you posted.

In an earlier post you commented that the muffin cups should be heated before adding the batter, but that step was not mentioned in the posted recipe. Is that because, for some reason, the recipe requires a different technique, or did you just neglect to include that step?

As for shortening - are you talking about something like Crisco? What other options are there for shortening?

Thanks!


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Here is the link to the recipe I posted.

http://www.melindalee.com/recipes/popovers-and-yorkshire-pudding/

It's also on the Let's Talk forum and on several other internet sites.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I've tried it and for me it did not work. The popovers rose but the insides were gummy and the inner spaces smaller. I like for them to puff so there are large hollow spaces inside so I can fill them with either a savory or sweet filling.

They were also tough - they looked okay but to me the texture and flavor are more important than appearance.

These are mine, light, tender and with big open spaces inside.

attachicon.gifpopovers.JPG

Did you vent the popovers after they come out of the oven? It's essential to let the hot air and moisture from the insides escape before they have a chance to condense. Not doing so leads to gummy interiors.


PS: I am a guy.

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I've tried it and for me it did not work. The popovers rose but the insides were gummy and the inner spaces smaller. I like for them to puff so there are large hollow spaces inside so I can fill them with either a savory or sweet filling.

They were also tough - they looked okay but to me the texture and flavor are more important than appearance.

These are mine, light, tender and with big open spaces inside.

attachicon.gifpopovers.JPG

Did you vent the popovers after they come out of the oven? It's essential to let the hot air and moisture from the insides escape before they have a chance to condense. Not doing so leads to gummy interiors.

Of course I vented them. I've been making popovers for fifty years. I read an article that advised putting the batter into cold cups and a cold oven and they took longer to rise (naturally a hot pan gives a "kick" to the batter) and after venting, they shrunk quite a bit as it seemed the wall structure was not as firm.

They were not up to my standards.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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POPOVERS from Melinda Lee

MAKES 6

2 eggs

1 cup, milk

1 cup, sifted flour

1/2 teaspoon, salt

1 tablespoons, melted solid vegetable shortening

additional vegetable shortening for greasing pans/cups

Preheat oven to 475 degrees.

Thoroughly grease interiors of cups in a 6-cup popover pan, a muffin pan, OR 6 oven-proof muffin cups (such as Pyrex cups).

Into a mixing bowl, break eggs, and beat gently.

Add milk, flour and salt.

Beat 1 1/2 minutes,

add melted shortening, and continue beating 1/2 minute more.

Do not overbeat.

Fill cups half full, or slightly more.

Place popover pan, or cups (on a cookie sheet) into preheated oven and bake for 10 minutes at 475 degrees.

Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue baking for 25-30 minutes, until puffed.

DO NOT OPEN OVEN DOOR TO CHECK UNTIL LAST 10 MINUTES OF COOKING.

A few minutes before popovers are golden brown and done, prick each, on one side, with a skewer to allow air and moisture to escape and interior of popover to dry somewhat.

Do you preheat the popover pan, if so when does it go in the oven?

I'd put in the shortening and preheat it while mixing the batter. Wait ten minutes then ladle in the batter

Absolutely preheat the pan. The batter should sizzle as it first drops into the cups.

I generally prepare the batter and set it aside to "rest" for about 30 minutes.

During this time I turn on the oven, grease the cups or muffin pan, (I also sometimes make "mini" popovers using custard cups - the ceramic kind) and place them in the oven to pre-heat for about 10 minutes.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I've decided to buy a popover pan, and I'm looking for this style: http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/chicago-metallic-professional-popover-pan-with-armor-glide-coating/1041651469?device=c&network=g&matchtype=&mcid=PS_googlepla_nonbrand_cookware_&gclid=CM7th5zZ27sCFUpBQgoddW8A2g although not necessarily this brand or model.

All the pans I've looked at have been nonstick, and I wonder about using a regular pan for popovers. Will nonstick be a problem at high oven temps over the long run? Are there any regular pans in this style? Is a heavier, thicker metal an advantage with popovers? What's a good depth/width to get good, tall results?


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I've decided to buy a popover pan, and I'm looking for this style: http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/chicago-metallic-professional-popover-pan-with-armor-glide-coating/1041651469?device=c&network=g&matchtype=&mcid=PS_googlepla_nonbrand_cookware_&gclid=CM7th5zZ27sCFUpBQgoddW8A2g although not necessarily this brand or model.

All the pans I've looked at have been nonstick, and I wonder about using a regular pan for popovers. Will nonstick be a problem at high oven temps over the long run? Are there any regular pans in this style? Is a heavier, thicker metal an advantage with popovers? What's a good depth/width to get good, tall results?

That "Armor-glide" coating is not like regular consumer type non-stick coatings. You still have to grease the cups. That's the one I have and it has been exposed to very high temps.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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of course you have to wait to get a few more 'must have' items to get to the free shipping

Or have Amazon Prime which may be the biggest bargain at Amazon.

I've been an Amazon Prime member since it was first offered. I buy a lot at Amazon and have saved a bundle in shipping costs over the years.

I also have the Nordicware petite popover pan - which I had completely forgotten about until I saw in on the page to which you linked. Thanks for doing that - now I have to check in the cabinet where all the rectangular baking pans are stored (on edge) to see if it has been pushed to be back and hidden by one of the other 23 pans in there.

Since there is now an Amazon warehouse in southern California, If I order something "Ships from and sold by Amazon" - like this popover pan - before 10 a.m., I will get it the following day with the FREE two-day shipping.


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I'm not sure it's the same pan. Amazon is frequently light on clear and complete descriptions.

It's the same pan that I have. I just weighed mine - 1 lb. 13 oz. so the shipping weight (2 pounds) shown is correct. And as I mentioned earlier, if you look and feel of the interior of these cups, it will not seem like "non-stick" coating. I have a lot of Chicago Metallic bakeware, including some cake pans that are at least 30 years old - had them prior to moving up here 25 years ago and I still use them, same with my sheet pans and 1/2 size sheet pans.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I'm not sure it's the same pan. Amazon is frequently light on clear and complete descriptions.

It's the same pan that I have. I just weighed mine - 1 lb. 13 oz. so the shipping weight (2 pounds) shown is correct. And as I mentioned earlier, if you look and feel of the interior of these cups, it will not seem like "non-stick" coating. I have a lot of Chicago Metallic bakeware, including some cake pans that are at least 30 years old - had them prior to moving up here 25 years ago and I still use them, same with my sheet pans and 1/2 size sheet pans.

Just returned from BB&B, disappointed. The BB&B site said my local store had the pans in stock, but that wasn't the case when I got to the store. None were on display, none were in the stockroom. Salesman said it would be two weeks, +/-, before the pan was in stock. So, it's good to know the Amazon pan is the same, and I'll order from there tomorrow. Thanks!


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Do you think kefir can be used successfully instead of milk for popovers? What about buttermilk? What, if anything, might have to be changed in a given recipe?


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I've never used anything but milk. I wouldn't use buttermilk because the acid might keep the batter from puffing as desired because buttermilk produces a much more tender "crust" on other baked goods and that's not what you want in a popover.

I would make them with a traditional recipe a few times, and then try some experiments.

This informative article from The Kitchn should help some.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I've never used anything but milk. I wouldn't use buttermilk because the acid might keep the batter from puffing as desired because buttermilk produces a much more tender "crust" on other baked goods and that's not what you want in a popover.

I would make them with a traditional recipe a few times, and then try some experiments.

This informative article from The Kitchn should help some.

Thanks! I'd been to the site but didn't see that page. You're right, of course, about starting with the basics. I was more curious than anything, and I already have a "traditional" recipe to start with. Just waiting for a pan, of which I have none. Hmmm ... just got an idea for a pan, which I may be able to use this weekend.

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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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Probably equivalent. Not sure which would be easier to clean.

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personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

and its cheaper !!!

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personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

and its cheaper !!!

. . . and dishwasher-safe.

Being able to put a pan in the dishwasher is a non-issue, FWIW.


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

and its cheaper !!!

. . . and dishwasher-safe.

Being able to put a pan in the dishwasher is a non-issue, FWIW.

It's an issue for me, and no doubt many others who might be considering the purchase of a popover pan.


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Based on reviews, clearly you should not buy the first one.

dcarch

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interesting

and that's the chicago metallic pop over tray !

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