Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

Thanks Gary.

Last year, here in SF, I was too lazy to stand in the Golden Gate Bakery line so picked up mooncakes at Dick Lee. My parents and aunt was NOT impressed and my aunt took me aside and told me that this year I should get their mooncakes at Great Eastern.

I'm still not eating more than a sliver, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooh, it's almost that time of year again! What day is mid-autumn this year?

On July 3 my husband came home from a business trip to S.F. with a terrific surprise for me: a box of four mooncakes from Eastern Bakery!!! To die for! Two mixed-nut, and two double-yoke- lotus-seed. I snarfed two in the wee a.m. hours, all by myself, while everyone else slept, then shared the remaining two with the kids and the husband for dessert that day, after dinner. I am so selfish and greedy when it comes to mooncakes!

Oh, how I wished Eastern Bakery did mail-orders!

Link to post
Share on other sites
snarfed two in the wee a.m. hours, all by myself, while everyone else slept, then shared the remaining two with the kids and the husband for dessert that day, after dinner. I am so selfish and greedy when it comes to mooncakes!

You ate 2 in one sitting, and didn't lay down the rest of the day?

And on top of that, you had room for about half of another one later?

Whoa.

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

Link to post
Share on other sites
snarfed two in the wee a.m. hours, all by myself, while everyone else slept, then shared the remaining two with the kids and the husband for dessert that day, after dinner. I am so selfish and greedy when it comes to mooncakes!

You ate 2 in one sitting, and didn't lay down the rest of the day?

And on top of that, you had room for about half of another one later?

Whoa.

Yep. "Sandwiched" between the dawn snack of two mooncakes and the evening dessert of about half a mooncake was my town's annual July 4th picnic of pulled pork barbecue, burgers, hot dogs, potato salad, corn on the cob, slaw, chips, and Ben & Jerry's ice cream bars, of all of which I partook liberally. Mooncakes and BBQ -- what a perfect Fourth of July it was!

But, goodness, this revived mooncake thread is just killing me! I haven't been able to stop thinking about mooncakes for the past two hours!

Need a mooncake, now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a fan of moon cakes, but I recently received an order form in the mail from Shengkee Bakery in San Francisco (I ordered moon cakes from them last year for friends and they turned out alright and they do have a website). I typically will only eat moon cakes during Mid Autumn Festival and then a maximum of 1 but usually more like a half for tradition's sake. I also don't really like the yolk ones and typically only eat the ones with paste. Starbucks in Beijing began offering moon cakes 2 years ago I think and around this time they usually have a special brochure where you can order some of their very untraditional moon cakes. I also rememeber seeing moon cake ads at one of the ice cream chains before I left Beijing, but can't remember which one (I think it was TCBY). Since KFC's sales of their "Macau" egg tarts seems to be doing pretty well, I wonder if they'll come out with moon cakes this year as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not a fan of moon cakes, but I recently received an order form in the mail from Shengkee Bakery in San Francisco (I ordered moon cakes from them last year for friends and they turned out alright and they do have a website). I typically will only eat moon cakes during Mid Autumn Festival and then a maximum of 1 but usually more like a half for tradition's sake. I also don't really like the yolk ones and typically only eat the ones with paste. Starbucks in Beijing began offering moon cakes 2 years ago I think and around this time they usually have a special brochure where you can order some of their very untraditional moon cakes. I also rememeber seeing moon cake ads at one of the ice cream chains before I left Beijing, but can't remember which one (I think it was TCBY). Since KFC's sales of their "Macau" egg tarts seems to be doing pretty well, I wonder if they'll come out with moon cakes this year as well.

Last mid-autumn moon festival (for lack of a business trip to S.F.), I bought a box of four Shengkee mooncakes from my local Chinese grocery, and they were delicious. There were two egg-yolk-lotus-seed and two red-bean-with-pine-nuts.

However, I found no mixed-nut mooncakes of the Shengkee brand or any other brand at the grocery, so I picked up two mixed-nut at Maria's, a chain Chinese bakery just outside D.C. in Rockville, Maryland. Did I regret this purchase or what?! The mixed-nut filling was syrupy and cloyingly sweet, with no subtlety of flavors at all. The pastry around the filling was blah. I could barely choke it down. Terrible. I'm spoiled by Eastern Bakery's mixed-nut mooncakes, which are peerless in my book.

But I am going to try to mail-order mixed-nut mooncakes this year from Shengkee. Thanks, Chengb02, for putting the idea in my head!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On July 3 my husband came home from a business trip to S.F. with a terrific surprise for me: a box of four mooncakes from Eastern Bakery!!!

Yeah, right, BB. I'm guessing it was one of those "I-don't-dare-come-back-without-it" kinds of "surprise."

Link to post
Share on other sites
On July 3 my husband came home from a business trip to S.F. with a terrific surprise for me: a box of four mooncakes from Eastern Bakery!!!

Yeah, right, BB. I'm guessing it was one of those "I-don't-dare-come-back-without-it" kinds of "surprise."

Gary, you must be my kind of husband! :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you guys ever tried the non-baked mooncakes? That's the top picture on the left. They look like they're made in Chernobyl.

The pictures on this website looked like those hand-painted ones made in the 40-50's. I am not sure what the green filling is.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
Link to post
Share on other sites
Ooh, it's almost that time of year again! What day is mid-autumn this year?

.....

Oh, how I wished Eastern Bakery did mail-orders!

It is September 28, 2004 Tuesday.

Since I heard "Eastern Bakery" mentioned a few times... can anybody tell me the street it's on (and the cross street)? I will be in SF again tomorrow and would like to drop by and pick up a few to try. Anybody knows the Chinese name? (In China Town, Chinese business names are much more prominent than their English ones)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
Link to post
Share on other sites
Ooh, it's almost that time of year again! What day is mid-autumn this year?

.....

Oh, how I wished Eastern Bakery did mail-orders!

It is September 28, 2004 Tuesday.

Since I heard "Eastern Bakery" mentioned a few times... can anybody tell me the street it's on (and the cross street)? I will be in SF again tomorrow and would like to drop by and pick up a few to try. Anybody knows the Chinese name? (In China Town, Chinese business names are much more prominent than their English ones)

720 Grant Avenue at Commercial St. (That's between Sacramento and Clay St.) You can't miss it, it's got pictures of Bill Clinton shopping there in the window. (He stopped by for a photo opportunity).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely love the lotus paste mooncakes, and the yolks are awesome. I always look foward to the autumn festival every year. My family always gets tins and tins of the mooncakes. :wub: I think the nut ones taste terrible. They look putrid as well... That's why I never take a bite out of a whole mooncake - I cut it open to see the filling first. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
I absolutely love the lotus paste mooncakes, and the yolks are awesome. I always look foward to the autumn festival every year. My family always gets tins and tins of the mooncakes. :wub: I think the nut ones taste terrible. They look putrid as well... That's why I never take a bite out of a whole mooncake - I cut it open to see the filling first. :D

Egad, does ANYONE ever take a bite out of a whole mooncake? Just doesn't seem right. Like buttering a whole slice of bread and biting off it. Even I go through the motions of cutting the mooncake in quarters before inhaling the whole thing! :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I eat them. I eat them incorrectly: I have rarely ever sliced one before biting into it...........I eat them in private (also incorrect form!).

Red bean paste ones are my favorites, followed by nut-and-fruit ones.

One is supposed to drink tea while eating them?? This is a revelation! I was always outside, freezing my hands and nose, admiring the roundness of the moon while popping them down!

I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, how I wished Eastern Bakery did mail-orders!

Kee Wah, which is a very famous restaurant making Moon Cake in Hong Kong, has established their US presence and has a website. I had been to their bakeries in Monterey Park, California and was always impressed with their bakery items. They offer mail order for Moon Cakes.

These Moon Cakes look more traditional.

Kee Wah Bakery

The prices seem a bit high though. But then again I don't eat Moon Cakes that much and haven't bought any in years (always got them from the in-laws), I am not familiar with the going price.

The mini Moon Cakes are very popular in recent years. With the minis, you never have to share. You can garble up the whole cake in one shot. But the traditional size and shape of Moon Cake is still the best on my book.

I haven't tried the ones in Eastern Bakery, but I think Kee Wah's should be comparable.

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
Link to post
Share on other sites
One is supposed to drink tea while eating them??  This is a revelation!  I was always outside, freezing my hands and nose, admiring the roundness of the moon while popping them down!

Haha, this post reminds me of my first year at college, far away from my parents and even farther from my girlfirend. I, stupidly, bought my own from a local store (in small town Indiana that meant they were originally from Chicago, who knows how many days they had been sitting there)and forced myself to eat at least one while freezing outside, sitting on the porch, looking at the moon and making myself incredibly sad, how pitiful i was, hehe! :biggrin:

as to the tea, in my opinion the only way mooncakes can be rendered edible is by having a good cup of tea at hand.

Edited by chengb02 (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
as to the tea, in my opinion the only way mooncakes can be rendered edible is by having a good cup of tea at hand.

Or a sniffer-ful of cognac... no, make that VSOP... no no no, make that XO. (Where is Laksa's virtual drink when you need it?)

A bright full moon is mysteriously mesmerizing to lead us to think about our loved ones especially those whom we cannot be with. [or should it be "with whom we cannot be"? Sounds weird.]

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, I eat them.  I eat them incorrectly: I have rarely ever sliced one before biting into it...........I eat them in private (also incorrect form!).

Red bean paste ones are my favorites, followed by nut-and-fruit ones.

One is supposed to drink tea while eating them??  This is a revelation!  I was always outside, freezing my hands and nose, admiring the roundness of the moon while popping them down!

Yes, I know that my eating mooncakes alone is totally incorrect. It's a bad thing, like drinking alone. Mooncakes are meant for eating with family and friends while gazing at the moon, which I also do (in addition to my private feast!).

As for the tea: I wouldn't dream of having mooncakes without the accompaniment of a delicate, flowery China tea. The night of the festival, we find the room in the house that has the best view of the moon through a window, and we set up an indoor picnic before that window. My kids think it's a lark and love it. I really look forward to the this annual event, about as much as Thanksgiving (United States holiday) and Christmas.

Thanks, hzrt8w, for the Kee Wah Bakery link. Sheng Kee (Taiwanese, and my (Taiwanese) parents' choice as the gold standard in mooncakes) or Kee Wah (Hong-Kong-based)? Wow, this is going to be fun, just researching the issue and deciding! Maybe both? I'm thinking a side-by-side taste-test is in order -- all in the name of scientific research, of course!

Edited by browniebaker (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, Cantonese speakers:

Let's see if I can get some semblance to pronunciation and getting this on here!

I remember learning this many mooncakes ago. :smile:

Chong tseen ming yuet gong,

Yee see dai sheung sheung.

Gueh tow mong ming yeut

Dye tow see goo hueung.

If someone can post the Chinese characters for this, it would be great! I can print it out for my Chinese students when the new term starts. We usually have an autumn BBQ with the new students and mooncakes and wotow go are my contributuions.

I pay about $25.00 for a tin of 4 lotus paste / double yolk regular size cakes. These come from Vancouver and have been fresh when they are brought in by Superstore. The shelves are bare within a couple days.

I find the mini-ones drier. One of my sons will snatch a couple right away and hide them in his room. He and I enjoy them the most.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      Chinese food must be among the most famous in the world. Yet, at the same time, the most misunderstood.

      I feel sure (hope) that most people here know that American-Chinese cuisine, British-Chinese cuisine, Indian-Chinese cuisine etc are, in huge ways, very different from Chinese-Chinese cuisine and each other. That's not what I want to discuss.

      Yet, every day I still come across utter nonsense on YouTube videos and Facebook about the "real" Chinese cuisine, even from ethnically Chinese people (who have often never been in China). Sorry YouTube "influencers", but sprinkling soy sauce or 5-spice powder on your cornflakes does not make them Chinese!
       
      So what is the "authentic" Chinese food? Well, like any question about China, there are several answers. It is not surprising that a country larger than western Europe should have more than one typical culinary style. Then, we must distinguish between what you may be served in a large hotel dining room, a small local restaurant, a street market stall or in a Chinese family's home.

      That said, in this topic, I want to attempt to debunk some of the more prevalent myths. Not trying to start World War III.

      When I moved to China from the UK 25 years ago, I had my preconceptions. They were all wrong. Sweet and sour pork with egg fried rice was reported to be the second favourite dish in Britain, and had, of course, to be preceded by a plate of prawn/shrimp crackers. All washed down with a lager or three.

      Yet, in that quarter of a century, I've seldom seen a prawn cracker. And egg fried rice is usually eaten as a quick dish on its own, not usually as an accompaniment to main courses. Every menu featured a starter of prawn/shrimp toast which I have never seen in mainland China - just once in Hong Kong.

      But first, one myth needs to be dispelled. The starving Chinese! When I was a child I was encouraged to eat the particularly nasty bits on the plate by being told that the starving Chinese would lap them up. My suggestion that we could post it to them never went down too well. At that time (the late fifties) there was indeed a terrible famine in China (almost entirely manmade (Maomade)).

      When I first arrived in China, it was after having lived in Soviet Russia and I expected to see the same long lines of people queuing up to buy nothing very much in particular. Instead, on my first visit to a market (in Hunan Province), I was confronted with a wider range of vegetables, seafood, meat and assorted unidentified frying objects than I have ever seen anywhere else. And it was so cheap I couldn't convert to UK pounds or any other useful currency.
       
      I'm going to start with some of the simpler issues - later it may get ugly!

      1. Chinese people eat everything with chopsticks.
       

       
      No, they don't! Most things, yes, but spoons are also commonly used in informal situations. I recently had lunch in a university canteen. It has various stations selling different items. I found myself by the fried rice stall and ordered some Yangzhou fried rice. Nearly all the students and faculty sitting near me were having the same.

      I was using my chopsticks to shovel the food in, when I noticed that I was the only one doing so. Everyone else was using spoons. On investigating, I was told that the lunch break is so short at only two-and-a-half hours that everyone wants to eat quickly and rush off for their compulsory siesta.
       
      I've also seen claims that people eat soup with chopsticks. Nonsense. While people use chopsticks to pick out choice morsels from the broth, they will drink the soup by lifting their bowl to their mouths like cups. They ain't dumb!

      Anyway, with that very mild beginning, I'll head off and think which on my long list will be next.

      Thanks to @KennethT for advice re American-Chinese food.
       
       
    • By Kasia
      ON THE CHRISTMAS TABLE - CHRISTMAS EVE CRANBERRY KISSEL
       
      One of my friends from Ukraine told me about her traditional Christmas dishes. Except for stuffed cabbage with potatoes (which I have made already) I was surprised about cranberry kissel. I searched the Internet and I saw that in many Polish homes Christmas Eve supper ends with cranberry kissel. In my home we always drink compote with dried fruit, but maybe this year we will try a new dish on our Christmas menu.

      I wonder why cranberries are on the Christmas table. I didn't find any particular information about it (except the fact it is tradition). I think that a few years ago cranberries were treated as a natural cure which aids digestion, and this could be quite useful after a hefty Christmas meal!

      At my Ukrainian friends' home Christmas kissel is runny like a drink, but you can prepare it like a dessert with a more dense texture. I made the drink version, but you should choose which is better for you.

      Ingredients:
      500g of cranberries
      a piece of cinnamon and a couple of cloves
      6-8 tablespoons of sugar
      2-3 tablespoons of potato flour

      Wash the cranberries and put them with the cinnamon and cloves in a pan. Pour in 500ml of water and boil until the fruit is soft. Remove the cinnamon and cloves and blend the rest. Add the sugar and mix it until it has dissolved. Sieve the cranberry mousse to make a smooth texture. Mix the potato flour with a bit of cold water. Boil the cranberry mousse and add the mixed potato flour, stirring constantly so it is not lumpy. Boil for a while. Pour the kissel into some glasses.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      CRANBERRY-APPLE CAKE
       
      The worst thing about my cranberry-apple cake is the way it looks. It didn't look impressive, but it was so yummy it disappeared from the baking pan before it had completely cooled down. My children said that it was a colourful apple pie, and it really was something like that. Apples with cinnamon are the basis of apple pie – one of my favourite cakes. However, the sour cranberries make it more fresh and interesting. The crumble topping was, for my son, the most important part of the cake. I had to drive him away, because otherwise the cake would have been deprived of its crunchy top.

      Ingredients (18×26cm cake tin ):
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 eggs
      1 packet of powdered vanilla blancmange
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      200g of sugar
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      pinch of salt
      fruit
      250g of fresh cranberries
      1 apple
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      crumble topping
      5 tablespoons of brown sugar
      100g of butter
      150g of flour
       
      First make the crumble topping. Put the cool butter, flour and sugar in a bowl. Knead them until you have small lumps. Leave it in the fridge.
      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a cake tin with some baking paper.
      Mix the flour with the baking powder and salt. Cream the butter with the sugar. Add egg after egg to the butter, stirring constantly. Add the flour, vanilla essence and powdered vanilla blancmange. Mix it together until you have a smooth dough. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the apple, remove the apple core and cube it. Mix the cranberries, apple, sugar and cinnamon in a bowl. Put the fruit on top of the dough. Cover the fruit with the crumble topping. Bake for 50 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      MILLET GROATS CHOCOLATE CREME WITH CRANBERRY MOUSSE
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for the best chocolate crème I have ever eaten. It is thick, smooth and very chocolaty in flavour and colour. Despite the chocolate, the dessert isn't too sweet. But if somebody thinks that it is, I recommend serving it with slightly sour fruit mousse. You can use cherries, currants or cranberries. You will make an unusually yummy arrangement and your dessert will look beautiful.

      My children were delighted with this dessert. I told them about the fact it had been made with millet groats after they had eaten it, and ... they didn't believe me. Next time I will prepare the millet groats crème with a double portion of ingredients.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      chocolate crème
      100g of millet groats
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of dark cocoa
      250ml of almond milk
      fruit mousse
      250g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel of one orange
      half a teaspoon of grated ginger
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Boil the millet groats in salty water and drain them. Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie. Blend the millet groats, chocolate, cocoa and milk very thoroughly until you have very smooth crème. Pour the milk in gradually to make the right consistency of your desert. Prepare the fruit mousse. Put the washed cranberries, ginger, juice orange peel and sugar into a pot. Boil until the fruits are soft. Blend. Put the chocolate crème into some small bowls. Put the fruit mousse on top. Decorate with peppermint leaves. Serve at once or chilled.

      Enjoy your meal!


    • By Kasia
      BICOLOUR DESERT WITH SEMOLINA
       
      Today when we think about breakfast with milk we can choose different kinds of flakes, granolas, muesli and milk which has sometimes never been anywhere near a cow. When I was a child, only semolina rolled oats and rice were on the menu. Semolina with milk – our hated everyday breakfast – means that I don't fancy using it in my kitchen. But, as they say, time is a great healer and semolina was on our table last weekend for dessert. The dessert had two colours: the first layer was vanilla, and the second was with cocoa. On the top I put some mousse with blueberries. The dessert was very grand and really very tasty.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      vanilla layer
      50g of semolina
      400ml of milk
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      cocoa layer
      50g of semolina
      400ml of milk
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      2 tablespoons of cocoa
      fruit mousse
      200g of blueberries
      1 tablespoon of brown sugar
      pinch of cinnamon
      1 tablespoon of lemon juice

      First prepare the vanilla layer of the dessert. Boil the milk with sugar and vanilla essence. When the milk has boiled, slowly add the semolina, stirring constantly so as not to make lumps. Keep boiling and stirring until the mixture is stiff. Put some small glasses into some small bowls and arrange them in such a way that they are resting at an angle. Put the mixture into the glasses and leave to congeal. Now make the cocoa layer. Boil the milk with sugar. Mix the semolina with the cocoa. When the milk has boiled, slowly add the semolina with cocoa, stirring constantly so as not to make lumps. Keep boiling and stirring until the mixture is stiff. Place the glasses upright and put the cocoa mixture into them. Leave to congeal. Wash the blueberries and blend them with the sugar, cinnamon and lemon juice. Put the fruit mousse on top of the dessert.

      Enjoy your meal!

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...