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47 minutes ago, heidih said:

Ah ok so I vote for the light wash. "Espresso candied kumquat" certainly intrigues :)  Did you play with that flavor combo at the Curious Kumquat?

No, its on my current menu with an Indian spiced dish featuring dokhla...playing off of a few thoughts starting with the fact that dokhla is often breakfast...hence espresso....then I fill skin with housemade sheeps yogurt...but its a lunch dish.

 

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One type of mooncake I've seen on sale this year, but not before are these "Olive Mooncakes".

 

mc1.thumb.jpg.a8752052fff76ec09041e8a4e87817ff.jpg

 

Note: The "olives" in question are Chinese olives (Canarium album) and not in any way related to what you and I think of as olives.Those in the first image are regular size; i.e approx 4" in diameter. They also offer a larger size (7" dia.)

 

mc3.thumb.jpg.54f148ebdd43ef471583a6eb060d0f81.jpg

 

or you can have a mixed box.

mc2.thumb.jpg.51a70dfee5b96fa588f5bcd35a24ec1c.jpg

 

Of course, you'll need something to wash the cakes down with and what goes better with olives than olives? Olive juice soft drink.

 

39995715_olivedrink.thumb.jpg.6820f9e495228b43c6826a9ace0af904.jpg

 

 

Edited by liuzhou
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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On 9/14/2018 at 11:52 AM, gfron1 said:

Here are my final cakes and they show the difference between un egg washed and a thinned eggwash.

Mooncakefinal.thumb.jpg.122e53d9efd35044e43cf6ca5bafb20e.jpg

 

Visually, without tasting these, I would definitely prefer the ones on the right without the eggwash. Just my opinion and I have no personal experience with mooncakes. The ones on the right are just prettier, and if you look at @liuzhou's posting, downthread of what we would expect to be authentic examples of mooncakes, the detail also seems to be more pronounced than what is going on with your eggwashed ones. If it were up to me, I would ditch the eggwash. :)

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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  • 11 months later...
2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

It's Mid-Autumn Festival (Mooncake day) today. Again.

Here is a little video that is going viral on WeChat, the main Chinese social media.
 
(It does contain a mooncake so is not as off-topic as might initially appear!)

Quite mesmerizing. Thanks for sharing.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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  • 11 months later...
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      Chinese food must be among the most famous in the world. Yet, at the same time, the most misunderstood.

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