Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The great vegetarian / vegan / definitions discussion, 2022


Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, cdh said:

The most jarringly weird sandwich I ever had was in the UK-  Very buttered bread with cheddar and branston pickle. 

I might love that!   During the vegetarian period I spent in the UK, ploughman's lunch was my pub order.     You see, you need the butter to cut the strong cheddar and pickle to brighten both.    Yes, I could do that!

  • Like 1

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I might love that!   During the vegetarian period I spent in the UK, ploughman's lunch was my pub order.     You see, you need the butter to cut the strong cheddar and pickle to brighten both.    Yes, I could do that!

 

Ploughman's lunches are rarely vegetarian! Thank heavens! Cheddar cheese is rarely vegetarian. Ploughmen certainly aren't!

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, liuzhou said:

 

Ploughman's lunches are rarely vegetarian! Thank heavens! Cheddar cheese is rarely vegetarian. Ploughmen certainly aren't!

Rough bread, strong Cheddar and a pickle that Americans would more likely akin to chutney all fall within the ordinary lacto-ova veg regime.   But, certainly  they are not vegan.

  • Like 1

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Rough bread, strong Cheddar and a pickle that Americans would more likely akin to chutney all fall within the ordinary lacto-ova veg regime.   But, certainly  they are not vegan.

 

Nor is cheddar usually vegetarian. It uses animal rennet. The scrapings of animals' stomachs. Neither vegetarian or vegan!

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Nor is cheddar usually vegetarian. It uses animal rennet. The scrapings of animals' stomachs. Neither vegetarian or vegan!

And there's milk too

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Technically correct.    Cheese is usually allowed a lacto-ovo veg.     I was neither, just avoided meat.    It was strictly how I felt like eating and wasn't the least philosophical.

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Technically correct.    Cheese is usually allowed a lacto-ovo veg.    

 

Technically correct just means correct.

 

None of the vegetarians I know (sad people) eat cheese unless they know it is truly vegetarian. 99% isn't. 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not so here.   In the '60s Green's restaurant, one of the nation's first vegetarian restaurants features cheese heavily in its menus.   

Vegetarianism is a continuum.  Like politics and religion, each person finds a place for himself on the arc.

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, you can re-define 'vegetarian' any way you choose, but for most it means abstaining from foods which involve products from dead animals. Most cheese does involve such products. Not that I mind!

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Technically correct just means correct.

 

None of the vegetarians I know (sad people) eat cheese unless they know it is truly vegetarian. 99% isn't. 

 

6 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Well, you can re-define 'vegetarian' any way you choose, but for most it means abstaining from foods which involve products from dead animals. Most cheese does involve such products. Not that I mind!

 

"None that I know" and "most" does not equal all.   

 

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

 

"None that I know" and "most" does not equal all.   

 

 

Well, I'll file that with the self-proclaimed vegetarians who eat fish or even chicken.

 

Vegetarians or vegetables?

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 7/3/2022 at 5:00 PM, liuzhou said:

Well, you can re-define 'vegetarian' any way you choose, but for most it means abstaining from foods which involve products from dead animals. Most cheese does involve such products. Not that I mind!


“Most cheese” may depend on where you live. Artisanal European cheeses with DOP or similar designations are generally still produced with animal rennet but the majority of cheeses produced in the US and UK now use a microbial rennet or laboratory-produced chymosin. I know nothing of Chinese cheeses. 
I read (here, though I have not verified elsewhere)that the switch to laboratory-produced enzymes was in part due to the decline in veal consumption which drove up the price of calf rennet, the most common type, and provided more impetus to develop non-animal options. I was aware of this but didn’t realize how widespread their use had become. 
Here's a link to a list of vegetarian-friendly cheeses.  Lots to choose from though none from China!


 

 

 

Edited by blue_dolphin
To add chymosin (log)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...