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Wine pairing for caramelized carrot soup from Modernist cuisine


fabritius
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I've tried to scour the internet for suggested wine parings for the caramelized carrot soup from Modernist cuisine at home, without luck. It tastes very different from your typical carrot soup, both sweeter and a lot more powerful. I'm thinking champagne might do the trick or I might revert to my "when in doubt" favorite - riesling (I'd guess something with quite a bit of body and some age). Does anyone have any experiences to share? 

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Welcome to eG, @fabritius!  I'm not a wine expert nor have I made this particular soup but I think I'd enjoy the nutty taste of a nice Amontillado sherry with it.  I like your riesling idea as well.  

My "when in doubt" wine is a Grüner Veltliner but I think it would just taste sour next to that soup. 

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Interesting question. I have no direct experience, but my go-to reference, What to Drink with What You Eat, does indeed list a Grüner as one of the two top wines to accompany carrots (a dry Riesling is one of the lesser recommendations). However, given the intensity of this version, and especially if you're opting for the coconut cream swirl, I'd choose a German or Austrian Riesling, maybe a Kabinett or a Spätlese with some age on it.

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As much as I love later Rieslings, I wonder if fabritius needs a bit more acid bite to balance out the sweetness?  I'd think Gruner would be great, as would a dry Riesling.  A chardonnay, not exceedingly fat, but giving some roundness and depth to match the richer sweetness - I'd think less "sugary" sweet, and more caramelization?

 

I've seen some suggestions for reds, but I haven't tried it and can't get a bead in my head.

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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  • 2 weeks later...

Late seeing this but I think Sherry would be a nice pairing or how about a something from the Jura like a Savagnin 'sous voile' K&L does a direct import of Domaine Dugois that can be found a great price for the quality. 

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11 minutes ago, AAQuesada said:

Late seeing this but I think Sherry would be a nice pairing or how about a something from the Jura like a Savagnin 'sous voile' K&L does a direct import of Domaine Dugois that can be found a great price for the quality. 

I've not had it.  Is this a vin jaune?

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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1 hour ago, AAQuesada said:

it's a basically a bit less oxidative, easier to drink/or introduce to people who aren't as familiar. i've had this one recently which I liked a lot.

 

2011 Domaine Dugois Savagnin Arbois Blanc (Sous Voile) - SKU 1221900 (klwines.com)

 

Cool.  Thanks!

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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I've made versions of this soup and have found some complex / odd flavors in it. I liked it, but my girlfriend thought it tasted like a tire fire. I did not judiciously core the carrots, as I believe the MC crew recommends (but the times I did core them, the flavor wasn't all that different).

 

If you're getting this kind of complexity, wine pairing would be harder. I think something acidic and cutting like while Paul O' recommends might work better than something sweet. 

Notes from the underbelly

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