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Fuchsia Dunlop's "Food of Sichuan" - Chinese Version


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Congratulations are due to Fuchsia Dunlop, whose "Food of Sichuan" has just been published in a Chinese language version - a rare honour here. I've ordered a couple of copies as gifts for local friends who loved the Engish version, but struggled with some language issues.

 

Ep62b4dWMAEFFFT.thumb.jpg.025705455e39dd2a18a46ff3465b8a1b.jpg

《川菜》,
中信出版社。

 

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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wow. It's like she's an authority not just to Western audiences but to the people that she writes about - that really proves here credentials. 

 

She did say during interviews that not many Chinese recipe books are published in China  - like the cuisine of a particular region etc. - so I hope this promotes more book and recipe writing in the East. 

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3 minutes ago, eugenep said:

 

She did say during interviews that not many Chinese recipe books are published in China  - like the cuisine of a particular region etc. - so I hope this promotes more book and recipe writing in the East. 

 

She really said that? It's not true! There are many recipe books published in China, including regional recipes. I have several. Including several Sichuan books.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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1 minute ago, liuzhou said:

 

She really said that? It's not true! There are many recipe books published in China, including regional recipes. I have several. Including several Sichuan books.

I think she was trying to do research in the 80s or something when writing her first cookbooks and she said it was very hard to find region specific cookbooks or even cookbooks at all. 

 

I guess things changed overtime. 

 

I hope the best cookbooks in China gets translated into English so people in the West can learn directly from the source. 

 

Some of my friends don't know if they are actually cooking authentic Chinese dishes when they cook in the West.

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20 minutes ago, liuzhou said:


Well, she didn't go to China until the 90s, as did I. And there were plenty of cookbooks then.

She said also that in China, chefs aren't seen as artists and celebrities like they are in the West. And that it's a low-brow profession. 

 

But people that lived in China say that's false but I don't really know myself. Maybe she is wrong? 

Edited by eugenep (log)
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1 minute ago, eugenep said:

But people that lived in China say that's false but I don't really know myself. Maybe she is wrong? 

 

Definitely wrong, if she said that. I haven't seen any quote like that, but she is often wrong about China.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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3 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Definitely wrong, if she said that. I haven't seen any quote like that, but she is often wrong about China.

Who knows what the context was but she flew in here to Los Angeles for one of Chef Yu Bo's dinners that he did with Chef Laurent Quenioux for nearly 1k per seat. So I'm pretty sure she knows Chinese celebrity chefs exist.

 

 

https://all-things-andy-gavin.com/2020/01/02/chef-yu-bo-lq-foodings/

Edited by AAQuesada
pictures of one of the dinners (log)
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