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Is Schweinshaxe in reality African ?


Duvel
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Everybody knows that Schweinshaxe, a beloved German staple, can be traced back to neolithic Mesopotamia , where it began as a simple millet gruel spiced with dried scraps of dung. Over the centuries, the dish made its way to the east, where the base was changed to brown rice and dung was replaced by fermented goat butter. The mongols brought the dish as far as the Danube river, where a travelling Bavarian trader bought the recipe, ditched the carbs, replaced the fermented goat butter with bone-in pork hocks and moved from boiling to the more economic roasting by open fire. 
But the real question for me is whether  Schweinshaxe did exist in preneolithic times ? I mean millet certainly was not invented in Mesopotamia, so might Schweinshaxe have a far older history, e.g. originate in Africa !?


Any hint would be most welcome !

Edited by Duvel (log)
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Not just African... it is clearly the product of The One True Culinary Genius who invented EVERYTHING the very first time.  Everything we all eat  traces back to the Genius... we just need to find the proof that confirms the perfectly self-evident hypothesis.  And then give all credit where it is due. 

Edited by cdh (log)
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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

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Of course, in

 

14 hours ago, Duvel said:

neolithic Mesopotamia , where it began as a simple millet gruel spiced with dried scraps of dung

 

Of course, while it was originally a simple peasant dish, there were renowned Messy Potatoan chefs who carefully selected their dung to suit different tastes, clients and seasons. Sheep dung was considered low grade; cattle dung hardly better. Camel dung was too expensive for the common man, but prized by the aristocracy, such as it was.

However, as only revealed centuries later, in the Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch Chronicles,  the prime ingredient for royalty was pork dung (from pigs fed only virgin girl's blood) mixed with seaweed and sawdust. This was known in Welsh as "hyfrydwch tail moch", later mistranslated into Xhosa as "iihagu zehagu' then retranslated into English as "pork hocks". Hence all the confusion.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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2 hours ago, Hassouni said:

Hey now, as an actual Mesopotamian, I'd like to state that my people have never eaten dung!


Neolithic, my friend, neolithic ...

 

God knows what they have consumed in my area, when the cradle of civilization was enjoying the dung-spiced gruel ...

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