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mebinsf

Condensation on the rim on my bonbons

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I have a problem that has been vexing me for a while. Every once and a while after I've cast my shells and poured my fillings (ganache or layers of caramel, pate de fruit etc), After the filling crystallizes, there will be what appears to be condensation on the chocolate rim of the bonbon. Sometimes it seems to inhibit the bonding of the cap- even after warming with a blow dryer. I use acetate to close my bonbons, but I don't think that makes a difference.

 

It happens on mildly humid days and very dry days. Sometimes it will happen on 2 out of 5 molds and the others are 'dry".

 

I'm at a total loss for what could be causing it. Does anyone else have this sort of thing happen? If so, is there a way to moderate or avoid it completely.

 

It may be a simple novice problem, but I can't seem to find anyone else discussing it.

 

Any insight is greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks.

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Are you sure it's condensation and not syrup oozing out of the filling due to compression / bad execution / bad formulation?

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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It doesn’t appear to be any oozing. The ganache is completely crystallized and dry. The condensation appears like tiny droplets on the rim of the chocolate shell. I’ll try to get a photo of it next time I see it.  

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From what you write it can't be condensation. Condensation would appear on random spots, not only on the rim of the shell. If it was condensation then it would evaporate with the blow drier.

It seems to be something similar to what happens with hand dipped bonbons when the center is too cold: the shell contracts too much and breaks in one point, contracting too much puts more pressure on the center, so some syrup oozes out of the break, forming a small droplet. Ganache is multi-phase, so you can't rule out oozing if the surface is dry.

My guess is that you are filling the molds before the shell is cristallized, so when the shell completely cristallizes it puts pressure on the filling, forcing it to ooze out some syrup. This is coherent to the fact that it happens both on humid and dry days. It's coherent with it happening to only 2 molds on 5.

Best way to know is by tasting a droplet of that "condensation" next time it happens.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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The shells are completely crystalized before I fill them. I always pull out a few to make sure they release from the molds. I will taste the condensation next time. I have tired it in the past but don't recall any flavor.

 

Such a strange issue. Thanks for your feedback. I'm sure we can find an answer.

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I've seen what you're describing on mine occasionally, I believe it's a result of a higher than ideal humidity - I feel like it happens more when I leave my product to crystallise where the air is quite still, so the air directly above the cavity is more humid than the room due to the water evaporating from the ganache and not being moved away by the air movement in the room. The amount of heat you would need to add to make it evaporate from the rims would completely melt that thin layer of chocolate. Can you try having some air movement over them whilst they crystallise?

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That makes sense. There is no air movement in my kitchen. I'll try a fan on them the next time.

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