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pastryani

Edible lacquer spray vs CB vs wax

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Hey guys - I saw an episode of cake masters where they were using edible lacquer spray to get an amazing shine on fondant.  I'm assuming this product can be used on chocolate as well, particularly chocolate that has been marred with fingerprints and has lost its natural tempered sheen. 9_9

 

My question is, in the absence of this lacquer spray, could one use their airbrush to spray out tempered cocoa butter and achieve the same shiny result?  Alternatively, could one use melted beeswax?  I've read that it's edible but not sure if it would impart any flavor, or if it would leave an undesirable waxy film in the mouth, Crisco-style.

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Some chocolatiers do airbrush molded chocolates with cocoa butter but the effect is flocked, not shiny. See Kate Weiser's ninja turtles and orange butterscotch here https://www.kateweiserchocolate.com/shop/build-a-box/

other bonbons have the molds painted first, you can see the difference between spraying the mold and spraying the chocolate. 

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And I'm pretty sure melted beeswax would be too hot.  

 

But you could brush a little sparkle dust on, that should help. 


Edited by pastrygirl Clarity (log)
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My understanding is that chocolate needs to set on something smooth and shiny to come out smooth and shiny (I'm sure its more technical/scientific than that, but I don't know). So if you spray a chocolate that is already out of the mould, the chocolate will not set against something that is smooth/shiny, so it wont be. If you spray INTO the mould and let it set, it would have set against the plastic and should come out smooth/shiny. That's why people who spray chocolates that have already been unmoulded go for the flocked look.

 

I agree with pastrygirl, it's amazing what metallic powder/luster dust/sparkle dust can hide :-)

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Oooh those are nice! 

 

I thought the flocked look came from spraying CB on cold bonbons, not just from spraying after they were unmolded? (though I haven't tried with bonbons so I don't know)

 

Hmm good point about the beeswax, looks like the melting temp is 144F, so that won't work, darn.  It'll take a LOT of luster dust to cover what I'm working on!!

 

 

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It was a while ago, but I used the laquer spray. I believe it was from Chef Rubber or Bake Deco.   I had to practice with it a bit, but it worked fine. It does take a bit of time to dry, but I ended up with a super-high gloss.   I tasted one to see if there was any sort of residual taste, and there wasn't any that I could detect. You know, research and development and all.:P

 

My purpose in using it was to preserve the display pieces for craft shows, etc.   

 

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-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

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Thanks all for the info!

 

I tried spraying with plain CB on a room temp piece, and that resulted in tiny beads of CB.  Rubbing that CB over the piece resulted in a glorious sheen for all of 5 seconds... until it dried, at which point I had matte chocolate again. :S

 

So I took your suggestions and went with luster dust - it took almost a quarter of the container, but it definitely covered up the matte chocolate.  Very time consuming and probably not sustainable if I wanted to make a bunch of these.  The lacquer spray would be faster and give sheen, but also pricey to use if you were making a lot.  Solution?  Not to get my warm (albeit gloved) paws all over nice 'n shiny chocolate.  (But I can't figure out how to do that while cleaning up the seams!). ¬¬

 

image.jpeg

 

 

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if you mix your metallic with alcohol (I use a 100% alcohol but I've seen others use vodka) you can spray it. I wouldn't use the gun you use for CB though.

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Just now, keychris said:

if you mix your metallic with alcohol (I use a 100% alcohol but I've seen others use vodka) you can spray it. I wouldn't use the gun you use for CB though.

 

Chris - would mixing your own luster + alcohol be the same as metallic airbrush colors that are usually used for spraying fondant?  I tried the latter and it resulted in tiny beading, though that might be because of the water content of those colors.

 

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I'm not sure - that's why I use 100% alcohol, it evaporates almost instantly leaving no beads when sprayed :)

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On May 13, 2016 at 4:37 PM, keychris said:

I'm not sure - that's why I use 100% alcohol, it evaporates almost instantly leaving no beads when sprayed :)

 

Hmm okay - I'll try it out with some vodka or everclear and let you know!

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On May 13, 2016 at 4:37 PM, keychris said:

I'm not sure - that's why I use 100% alcohol, it evaporates almost instantly leaving no beads when sprayed :)

 

Chris - I tried it out and got beads. :(  If I had to guess, I'd say I was rushing it and was spraying from too close.  What chocolate pieces do you spray?  From how far do you spray and how many total passes do you make?

 

image.jpeg

 

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