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FrogPrincesse

"Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails"

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Smoked Julep (Phil Ward) with Laphroaig 10 (subbed for the 12), Daron XO Calvados (instead of Laird's apple brandy), maple syrup. Like a very smoky apple. Similar to the Shruff's End in Julep form, and with less flourish.

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Calva Dorsa Royale (Phil Ward) with Daron XO calvados, St-Germain, St George absinthe, Pierre Gimmonet brut dry Champagne.

 

It's ok... Better with a heavy hand on the absinthe so the St-Germain is somewhat covered up. But I am not entirely convinced it's not a waste of good Calvados or good Champagne...

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse Fixing picture link...maybe (log)

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More sparkling cocktails exploration. This one was a bit better. It's a cognac/sparkling take on the Last Word but obviously with the Champagne it tastes much lighter.

 

Julien Sorel (Phil Ward) with Pierre Ferrand 1840 and Landy VS cognac, green Chartreuse, Luxardo maraschino liqueur, lemon juice, Pierre Gimonnet dry Champagne.

 

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Finally a sparkling cocktail with a little more punch, the rum version of Milk & Honey's sparkling Manhattan, the Chicago Cocktail. South Sider (Alex Day) with El Dorado 8 demerara rum (substituted for the 12), Maurin sweet vermouth (subbed for Carpano Antica), Angostura bitters, Peychaud's and Creole bitters, dry Champagne.

At first there is some tomato sauce/savory notes from the vermouth but then I got these crazy smooth vanilla notes from the rum as everything meshed together. This is very good.

 

South Sider (Alex Day) with El Dorado 8 demerara rum, Maurin sweet vermouth, Angostura bitters, Peychaud's and Creole bitters, dry Champagne #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #rum #demerara #champagne #deathandco

 

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First off, I want to say thanks a ton, I've been reading this thread for awhile now and love it!  I finally joined so I could ask a question that I'm hoping those with experience can answer.  Is there really a difference between a drink made with D&Co House Orange Bitters (equal parts: Fee Brothers West Indian Orange, Regans' Orange, Angostura Orange) and a drink made just with Angostura Orange Bitters?  

 

I understand you can of course go with just the Angostura (which I've been doing), but I would love some thoughts from those that have tried a drink made with the house blend and with just Ango Orange.  I'm really hesitant to buy two more orange bitters when I'd rather spend it on flavors I don't have at all.  

 

Thanks so much for any advice you might have!

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Just now, KK said:

First off, I want to say thanks a ton, I've been reading this thread for awhile now and love it!  I finally joined so I could ask a question that I'm hoping those with experience can answer.  Is there really a difference between a drink made with D&Co House Orange Bitters (equal parts: Fee Brothers West Indian Orange, Regans' Orange, Angostura Orange) and a drink made just with Angostura Orange Bitters?  

 

I understand you can of course go with just the Angostura (which I've been doing), but I would love some thoughts from those that have tried a drink made with the house blend and with just Ango Orange.  I'm really hesitant to buy two more orange bitters when I'd rather spend it on flavors I don't have at all.  

 

Thanks so much for any advice you might have!

It's going to be a minute difference, because bitters are used just a few drops at a time, and taste buds are not that sensitive!

The Angostura orange is fine. In comparison, the Regan's has a more pronounced cardamom flavor which is really nice. The Fee however is not that complex, so I would not go out of my way to get it.

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And welcome to eGullet @KK! It's always good to have new people join our cocktail party. :)

 


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Park Life Swizzle (Thomas Waugh) with Endeavour barrel-aged Old Tom gin (substituted for Ransom), Lustau Los Arcos amontillado sherry, homemade falernum, lime juice, B.G. Reynolds ginger syrup, Angostura bitters.

Very grape-forward. A bit too sweet with a lot of fruity flavors going on, with a savory note in the finish. I would maybe replace the ginger syrup by ginger liqueur for more dryness.

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse typo (log)

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3 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

And welcome to eGullet @KK! It's always good to have new people join our cocktail party. :)

 

 

4 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

It's going to be a minute difference, because bitters are used just a few drops at a time, and taste buds are not that sensitive!

The Angostura orange is fine. In comparison, the Regan's has a more pronounced cardamom flavor which is really nice. The Fee however is not that complex, so I would not go out of my way to get it.

Thanks for the incredibly fast response!  I'm really excited to find a group of people going through this book like I am, and glad to know it's not a big deal if I don't have all those bitters.  

 

 In reference to your latest post (Park Life Swizzle), anyone have recommendations for homemade falernum recipes?  (I did a quick search of this site, but came across much older posts - perhaps someone has come across something better since?)

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49 minutes ago, KK said:

 

Thanks for the incredibly fast response!  I'm really excited to find a group of people going through this book like I am, and glad to know it's not a big deal if I don't have all those bitters.  

 

 In reference to your latest post (Park Life Swizzle), anyone have recommendations for homemade falernum recipes?  (I did a quick search of this site, but came across much older posts - perhaps someone has come across something better since?)

 

You are very welcome. And you picked a great cocktail book to go through!

 

About falernum recipes, I did a review of published recipes a while back. Based on it, I've been very happy with the recipe that Adam Elmegirab posted on eGullet. That's my go-to recipe, and it has a great shelf-life too. 

Whatever you do, don't buy Taylor's velvet falernum. Its flavor is so weak, it's is a joke... Like clove flavored syrup. That's one case where it absolutely pays off to make your own.


Edited by FrogPrincesse minor edit (log)
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4 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

That's one case where it absolutely pays off to make your own.

 

 

Definitely!

 

Welcome, KK.  I'm not convinced about the D&C house orange, but I think their house Peychaud's has a certain something in, say, the May Fair.  It may be just an illusion, but I don't know if I'll ever get to New York so it might be the closest to a 'real' D&C cocktail I'll get.

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Thanks!  Sorry for all the Qs, but it's great having people to talk to...I've bored all my friends and family with talk about cocktails to the point I have to get them drunk now just so they'll listen to any of it (which luckily is easy to do with PDT and Death&Co books I'm working through).  Glad to hear a seconded "don't worry about it" regarding the orange bitters, guess it gives me an excuse to order the creole bitters!  

 

It's been hard to find Punt e Mes and Dolin Rouge to make the "house vermouth."  Another question of "worth it?"  Or just stick to the Martini Rosso when they call for house sweet?  As an aside I do have Carpano Antica which I use when it's specifically called for in a recipe.

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I don't think you would regret buying any of these two. Punt e Mes and Dolin rouge are two great vermouths, and the Punt e Mes has a bitter edge that the Martini Rosso doesn't possess. As a compromise, you could buy only the Punt e Mes and mix it with the M&R you already own to use as "house vermouth". But honestly, the recipes also work great if you use your favorite sweet vermouth instead of a blend.

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19 minutes ago, KK said:

Thanks!  Sorry for all the Qs, but it's great having people to talk to...I've bored all my friends and family with talk about cocktails to the point I have to get them drunk now just so they'll listen to any of it (which luckily is easy to do with PDT and Death&Co books I'm working through). 

you totally sum up my situation :D 

welcome KK and don't hesitate to look for older topics. The quantity of information is incredible, enjoy !

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Ty Cobbler: Siete Leguas blanco tequila (Milagro blanco), Cynar, sugar, Xocolatl Mole bitters, brandied cherries (Bing cherries), orange

 

A somewhat odd drink, in that in appearance it looks like it will be bright and fruity, but the Cynar and bitters make its taste more dark and boozy. 

IMG_1929.jpg

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On 16/03/2016 at 8:06 AM, KK said:

 Is there really a difference between a drink made with D&Co House Orange Bitters (equal parts: Fee Brothers West Indian Orange, Regans' Orange, Angostura Orange) and a drink made just with Angostura Orange Bitters?  

Yes there's a noticeable difference. Cocktail bitters are a significant variable in the flavour profile of any drink and you can really change a drink dramatically with just a few drops, that's the point of them. D&Co's Orange bitters though? Honestly compared to making orange bitter from scratch to get the specific flavour profile you are after it feels a bit like the D&C guys just went for an easy cop out on how to have a more complex orange bitters. Fee bros is sweeter and far simpler than the other two, angostura is a bit synthetic, Regan's is the pick of the bunch if you had to just go with one for most drinks.

Honestly though the internet is full of opinions. Your cocktail game will improve out of sight once you start trying things side by side. Make the same drink twice and only vary the bitters, see if you can taste the difference, get your friends to sip them too and see if they can taste it. If you can then it's a real thing.

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Saz Who? (Brian Miller) with Denizen Merchant's Reserve rum, Williamine pear eau-de-vie, demerara syrup, Peychaud's + Berg & Hauck's bitters, Angostura bitters, St. George absinthe. I decided to use the Denizen because that's the rum I was in the mood for and I didn't want anything too sweet. There was a lot going on between the eau-de-vie and the rum. The first few sips were all over the place but this was nice in the end, very flavorful.

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse getting rid of extraneous/unwanted links (log)

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Classic Sazerac a la Death & Co. Rittenhouse rye whiskey, Landy cognac (subbed for PF 1840), demerara surup, Peychaud's & Angostura bitters, St. George absinthe (subbed for Vieux Pontarlier). No complaints here. It's delicious.

 

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Miss Behavin' (Brian Miller) with Daron XO calvados, Morand Williamine pear eau-de-vie, lemon juice, simple syrup, Ferrer Sonoma brut sparkling wine. I reduced the simple syrup by half which was a good call. This is very pleasant, light and peachy actually. I can't really say that it fully highlights the subtleties of the apple brandy or pear eau-de-vie, but it's a nice drink.

 

Miss Behavin' (Brian Miller) with Daron XO calvados, Williamine pear brandy, lemon juice, simple syrup, sparkling wine #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #calvados #eaudevie #deathandco

 

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I made a couple of Dos Besitos (Scott Teague) last night as the internet was filled with tequila-based drinks.

 

The recipe calls for both repo and blanco tequila along with pineapple, lime, agave syrup, and grenadine. I used Altos Olmeca blanco, Arrogante repo (reduced by 1/4oz), and added a 1/4oz of Del Maguey Vida to kick it up a bit. Very slurpable!

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Not-Quite-Georgia Julep (Phil Ward) with Daron XO Calvados, Landy cognac, Briottet wild peach liqueur.

Not the most harmonious calvados/cognac combo, but I can see the potential.

 

Not-Quite-Georgia Julep (Phil Ward) with Daron XO Calvados, Landy cognac, Briottet wild peach liqueur #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #julep #calvados #cognac #deathandco

 

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A lot of sparkling cocktails are a bit of a let down, but this one had a ton of punch! Loved it! It's clearly a riff on the French 75, and a superior one. The Cointreau + maraschino combination is very interesting.

 

Mig Royale (Phil Ward) with Tanqueray Old Tom gin (substituted for Plymouth), lemon juice, Luxardo maraschino liqueur, Cointreau, dry champagne.

 

Mig Royale (Phil Ward) with Tanqueray Old Tom gin, lemon juice, Luxardo maraschino liqueur, Cointreau, champagne #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #champagne #deathandco #gin #cointreau #maraschino #philward

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Silver Monk (Phil Ward) with Tequila Ocho plata, lime juice, yellow Chartreuse, simple syrup, mint, cucumber, salt, Boy Drinks World serrano tincture.

 

I tried it before adding the Serrano tincture (the book suggests a jalapeno-infused tequila as an alternate option) and it needed it to pop, because it tasted rather flat without it. With the tincture it's a fun and balanced drink. However it doesn't really do justice to the tequila (maybe use a less nice tequila like here...), or the yellow Chartreuse for that matter, which is uses rather generously (3/4 oz!). There is nothing wrong with it, but I didn't find it better than the sum of its parts.

 

Silver Monk (Phil Ward) with Tequila Ocho plata, lime juice, yellow Chartreuse, simple syrup, mint, cucumber, salt, Boy Drinks World serrano tincture

 

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The Brooklyn with the Death & Co specs: Rittenhouse 100 rye, Dolin dry vermouth, Amaro Ciociaro, Luxardo maraschino. Really wonderful. Now I have to go back and compare it against the other versions...

 

For reference, this one is:

  • 2 oz Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey
  • 3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
  • 1/4 oz Amaro Ciociaro
  • 1 teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino

 

Brooklyn a la Death & Co with Rittenhouse 100 rye, Dolin dry vermouth, Amaro Ciociaro, Luxardo maraschino #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #rye #whiskey #deathandco

 

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