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Blackberry Cobbler?


AnnieWilliams
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Does anyone have a great recipe for blackberry cobbler? My friend asked me to make one for his birthday. He said his mother used to make them and they lived up north. I have seen several recipes. Some use kind of a drop biscuit, others a cake, and one recipe I found called for making little pie crust dumplings and cooking them on the stove with the blackberry filling and then topping the whole thing with a lattice crust before being baked.

I am not sure what is considered "authentic" and unfortunately he's been out of town all week so I couldn't get the details. I'm more of a pie gal myself, so I like recipes which use regular pie dough. However, I do realize that those types of recipes are probably not a true cobbler.

If anyone has an awesome blackberry cobbler recipe I would appreciate it!

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I don't know of any blackberry cobblers, but this cobbler recipe (an amalgam of three plus my own take) is so delicious that I serve it often. Can't see why you couldn't just use blackberries instead of blueberries...but then I could be completely wrong. (Never been that crazy about blackberries...too many seeds.)

Blueberry Cobbler Recipe

2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries
1 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest
1/3 cup sugar


1/2 cup butter (1 stick)
1 cup all purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup milk


Preheat oven to 350˚F.

Melt butter and pour into baking dish. (I use an 8" square glass dish, but a pie plate will work)

In a mixing bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Pour in milk and mix into smooth, thick batter. Pour into dish and spread fairly evenly.

In a bowl toss together berries, zest, sugar, lemon juice, and cornstarch until combined well and place on top of the batter.

Bake for 45-50 minutes (Until bubbly and browned)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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You have entered the very dangerous territory of buckle/cobbler/roly-poly/slump/grunt terminology; I've even heard people refer to a crisp (as in apple crisp) as a cobbler. This is why it would be best to get a description from your friend; "up north" probably has a very distinct view (up north where?). I personally consider a cobbler more a biscuit-topped fruity thing. But here are things that might qualify:

Darienne's recipe is very similar to what I call a buckle: Here is my version. It is indeed very good.

A blackberry roly-poly, that I have heard others refer to as my "cobbler." : here

A plain cake, that others might call a cobbler, and I have friend that calls it a buckle: here

As Darienne says, use any fruit! Blackberries will work with all; bear in mind they can be very juicy. Call it all what you like. It's too confusing.

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I've always made blackberry grunt pretty much the same way that Alton Brown does, but I've never followed a formal recipe.

Always with drop biscuit batter and in a cast iron skillet. It's the way my grandmother made it for ages.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/blackberry-grunt-recipe/index.html

~Martin

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Thanks so much for your replies. Janeer, I think he grew up in New York but not totally sure. I will get more clarification on Monday when I see him. You are right about the confusing terminology; in looking at the recipes I can't tell the difference among them as far as tiles are concerned. I just took a peek at my 1975 Joy of Cooking and their fruit cobbler calls for a recipe of their fluffy biscuit dough. Too many choices. :)

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It is one of my favourite summer desserts, when local blackberries or raspberries are in season.

Great served with ice cream or whipped cream, but I also like a

Blackberry%20Cobbler%20with%20White%20Ch

warm white chocolate sauce or

Blackberry%20Cobbler%20with%20Vanilla%20

a vanilla sauce.

Blackberry Cobbler

Adapted from Recipe found on the Betty Crocker Website
1/2 cup butter
1 cup white sugar
1 cup flour
3/4 cup of milk
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups blackberries
extra sugar to sprinkle on top

Heat oven to 350°F.
Melt butter in small baking dish.
Mix flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder together. Stir in milk and vanilla. Pour in melted butter and stir to blend. Pour back into baking dish. Sprinkle blackberries on top and press down slightly. Sprinkle with sugar and bake 45 to 50 minutes or until done.

Serve warm or at room temperature with whipped cream or ice cream. Or drizzle with Vanilla cream sauce or a white chocolate cream sauce.

NOTE: Substitute Blueberries, Raspberries, Peaches, etc....

Vanilla Cream Sauce

Source: Lori

This sauce is like a white caramel sauce.

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise

Melt butter and add sugar and cream. Add vanilla bean. Simmer over low heat for about 5 minutes. Remove vanilla bean and serve warm over Bread and Butter Pudding, Gingerbread cake, cobblers, etc...

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Wow that looks delicious! Could the sauce be made in advance and re-heated in the microwave at work? I was also going to make some homemade vanilla ice cream. Good grief, ya'll got me wanting cobbler for breakfast!

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What a hoot!. I grew up in Quebec and Ontario, Canada and in a family which never made any kind of buckle/cobbler/roly-poly/slump/grunt/?. I'd never even tasted one until I made one from a recipe.

Probably have to make my blueberry "buckle" this afternoon after thinking about it for two days. :raz:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Wow that looks delicious! Could the sauce be made in advance and re-heated in the microwave at work? I was also going to make some homemade vanilla ice cream. Good grief, ya'll got me wanting cobbler for breakfast!

Annie, I reheat the sauce for leftover cobbler so no reason why you couldn't make the sauce in advance.

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I have a couple of thoughts. Blackberries will seep out more juice than blueberries in my experience and they won't hold up as long in the oven while baking. Here in the Pacific Northwest we make cobblers with blackberries, loganberries, marionberries and boysenberries. All very similar berries. As for buckle, I make it with huckleberries in very late summer, but my version of a buckle is more like a coffee cake.

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Ann, thanks for the tip about reheating the sauce. Also thanks everyone else for your suggestions. I just talked to my friend today and he said his mom did not use a biscuit type dough. He said she used a pie dough. This is interesting because it's not typical of most recipes I've seen. I have found a few though. I did have a Southern Living blueberry cobbler recipe which used pie dough and pecans and it was actually very delicious. It's my husband's favorite dessert. The other recipe I found is called "southern style" and it has you make little pie dough dumplings which are cooked in the filling and then the whole thing is baked with a lattice crust. Maybe I will give that a try.

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Ann, thanks for the tip about reheating the sauce. Also thanks everyone else for your suggestions. I just talked to my friend today and he said his mom did not use a biscuit type dough. He said she used a pie dough. This is interesting because it's not typical of most recipes I've seen. I have found a few though. I did have a Southern Living blueberry cobbler recipe which used pie dough and pecans and it was actually very delicious. It's my husband's favorite dessert. The other recipe I found is called "southern style" and it has you make little pie dough dumplings which are cooked in the filling and then the whole thing is baked with a lattice crust. Maybe I will give that a try.

By whatever name, that sounds delicious.
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It is one of my favourite summer desserts, when local blackberries or raspberries are in season.

Great served with ice cream or whipped cream, but I also like a

Blackberry%20Cobbler%20with%20White%20Ch

God, that looks good. I use all my boysenberries to make pies every summer, but I may have to dedicate some of them to this recipe.
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