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Jeffrey Weiss

French charcuterie workshops in the US

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Hello All!

I wanted to share some great news-- my friend, French cook and culinary instructor Kate Hill, is bringing famed butcher and charcuterie master Dominique Chapolard for a bunch of workshops.

There's still seats available at some of the sites--here is a link with the details:

http://kitchen-at-camont.com/2013/02/24/two-day-workshops-in-the-usa-the-french-pig-making-farmstead-charcuterie/

TTFN, jeff

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