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Passion Fruit Ganache, vanishing flavor?

15 posts in this topic

I made some passion fruit ganache last weekend. In fact I made three different batches, recipes from Greweling, Notter and Torres. When I tried them last weekend they all had plenty of passion fruit flavor. Tried them again last night and it seems that the passion fruit flavor has mellowed quite a bit and if this continues, soon they will not taste of passion fruit at all. I have not had this happen for any other ganaches. Wondering if anyone else has experienced this and how they fixed the problem.

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Did you start from fruit or from commercial fruit puree?

I've never used a fruit puree but have a can of Goya Guava paste in my supply of 'not-used-yet' stuff and thought about making a ganache with it.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I started with commercial fruit puree.

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In the Modernist Cuisine they describe that the flavor from fresh fruit juice is due to the many chemical intermediates produced from different ongoing enzymatic reactions within the juice. Once these reactions proceed to completion, the flavor is changed/reduced. They recommend adding a small amount of fresh juice to the preparation to "re-fill" the starting reagents, which will produce the full flavor profile after a bit of time (temporarily).

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I've made passionfruit/mango ganache using the recipe from William Curley's Chocolate Couture book several times and had no problem with the flavor fading. The passionfruit flavor is strong. Actually, I can't taste the mango. I've had the chocolates around for 2-3 weeks and the flavor has not seemed to change. I used commercial passionfruit and mango purees.

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Thanks for the info cmflick, will try the Curley recipe next time.

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Where do you guys buy your commercial passion fruit puree from? I've looked before, and most places the shipping prices are extremely high...

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Where do you guys buy your commercial passion fruit puree from? I've looked before, and most places the shipping prices are extremely high...

I use Goya or Andino's Food (from Ecuador) from the local hispanic market. I think that there is a brand called La Fe as well, but I don't have any of them right now. All seem fine to me. I can't afford the shipping on other purees. The down side is that there is not as wide a range of purees as with something like Boiron. Most of what I use is passionfruit and mango. Fruits that are available seasonally, I make my own purees and freeze them.

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Where do you guys buy your commercial passion fruit puree from? I've looked before, and most places the shipping prices are extremely high...

I have gotten puree from L'Epicerie. Albert Uster is nearby and I can pick up small amounts of puree from them.

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Where do you guys buy your commercial passion fruit puree from? I've looked before, and most places the shipping prices are extremely high...

Where are you located?

Nebraska. I have looked at L'Epicerie, but last time I checked shipping was close to $30, which isn't really worth it for me. I have ordered passion fruit concentrate online, which works well (I've only used it for drinks so far), but I am not sure how it compares to the puree, especially for things like ganache or sorbets.
Edited by Erdbeereis (log)

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Where do you guys buy your commercial passion fruit puree from? I've looked before, and most places the shipping prices are extremely high...

Where are you located?

Nebraska. I have looked at L'Epicerie, but last time I checked shipping was close to $30, which isn't really worth it for me. I have ordered passion fruit concentrate online, which works well (I've only used it for drinks so far), but I am not sure how it compares to the puree, especially for things like ganache or sorbets.

I use Perfect Puree's Passion Fruit Concentrate in my ganache filling. It works great and is probably my most popular flavor. I've had no problem with the flavor disappearing. Perfect Puree's shipping is out of control, and I think it's the same if ordered through Amazon. They only ship overnight and slap on big surcharges for orders under 4 containers. Whole Foods used to have the smaller home containers, but I think Perfect Puree stopped making them.

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I use Perfect Puree's Passion Fruit Concentrate in my ganache filling. It works great and is probably my most popular flavor. I've had no problem with the flavor disappearing. Perfect Puree's shipping is out of control, and I think it's the same if ordered through Amazon. They only ship overnight and slap on big surcharges for orders under 4 containers. Whole Foods used to have the smaller home containers, but I think Perfect Puree stopped making them.

RWood, from what I understand, the concentrate is twice the strength of regular puree. Therefore, do you use half as much as you would use puree?

I used the Perfect Puree product for a RLB cake, and I think I had to dilute it to use. For a ganache however, it makes no sense to add water. So how do you work with the concentrate?

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I use Perfect Puree's Passion Fruit Concentrate in my ganache filling. It works great and is probably my most popular flavor. I've had no problem with the flavor disappearing. Perfect Puree's shipping is out of control, and I think it's the same if ordered through Amazon. They only ship overnight and slap on big surcharges for orders under 4 containers. Whole Foods used to have the smaller home containers, but I think Perfect Puree stopped making them.

RWood, from what I understand, the concentrate is twice the strength of regular puree. Therefore, do you use half as much as you would use puree?

I used the Perfect Puree product for a RLB cake, and I think I had to dilute it to use. For a ganache however, it makes no sense to add water. So how do you work with the concentrate?

I don't dilute it in any way. I replaced half of the cream with the concentrate. Heat them together and pour over white chocolate. It's never been too strong of a flavor, and it's always been one, if not the, most popular flavor I've made.


Edited by RWood (log)

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