• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

heidih

"Burma - Rivers of Flavor" by Naomi Duguid

16 posts in this topic

I just read a positive review of Burma - Rivers of Flavor in LA Weekly. I am a fan of her other books and am considering this one. Has anyone else purchased or have opinions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The book is amazing. Simply amazing.

I pre-ordered it and just finished reading the whole thing, cover to cover. I haven't yet cooked anything from it, but I went to an event with Naomi Duguid where they served samples of the "spiced rubbed jerky" (page 196) and the "sticky rice cake" (page 279). Both dishes were fantastic.

I am planning to start cooking from it next week. Still deciding which dishes to make first - there are so many I want to try!

Would love to know if anyone has cooked anything from it, and which dishes are tried and recommended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful book, and everything I've made from it so far has been delicious. To date, I've made the Chicken in Tart Garlic Sauce, Lima Beans with Galangal, Roasted Eggplant Salad, Golden Egg Curry, the Shallot-Lime Chutney, and Tart-Sweet Chile-Garlic Sauce. Standouts were the chicken and the egg curry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful book, and everything I've made from it so far has been delicious. To date, I've made the Chicken in Tart Garlic Sauce, Lima Beans with Galangal, Roasted Eggplant Salad, Golden Egg Curry, the Shallot-Lime Chutney, and Tart-Sweet Chile-Garlic Sauce. Standouts were the chicken and the egg curry.

Sounds wonderful - Here is the topic about cooking the recipes. Pictures ?:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mike! I'm planning to make the lima beans with galangal first, since I have some galangal in the fridge that needs to be consumed.

I will report my experiments in the cooking thread about this book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds wonderful - Here is the topic about cooking the recipes. Pictures ?:)

No decent ones, but a friend took this with his phone.

IMG_3575.jpg

Note: This was also after we had eaten...


Edited by MikeHartnett (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mike! I'm planning to make the lima beans with galangal first, since I have some galangal in the fridge that needs to be consumed.

I will report my experiments in the cooking thread about this book.

Awesome. Enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol. I was just writing about her last book on my blog!

How is this one different from the collaborations with Jeffrey Alford (I guess now her ex-husband - I notice he doesn't even get a mention in the thanks page). I guess one thing is some of their previous books were a bit formulaic in the recipe - mini essay - beautiful photograph - large format type structure. I notice the format of this book isn't as big... Is there much else different or is it still the same set-up?

Also I wonder if this book would have still come out if the (relative) thaw in Burmese politics hadn't happened. It would have been a bit weird to put it out if things were still as they were a year or two ago... Or maybe it would have been a good way to highlight the country's plight?

Hmmm

J


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Naomi Duguid started her research for this book in 2009, so I am pretty sure the book would have come out regardless of politics. Ethinc food has a way of uniting people through cultural understanding.

I heard Naomi say that she was extremely active in her research on every trip she made to Burma, because she always though it could be her last, due to the volatile political situation.

I don't find the book that different from previous ones. Sure, the format is a bit different. But the writing style (travel story followed by recipes) is the same, the photography is equally good (in fact, the photographer - Richard Jung - worked on some of her other books), and I am finding the quality of the recipes also similar.

The flavors and basic ingredients are different though. Burmese food is quite different from the food of the countries around it. Lots of turmeric and shallots, which suits me just fine because I love both :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally started cooking from the book. I made the following dishes:

* Tart-sweet chile-garlic sauce

* Tender greens salad with crispy fried shallots

* Intensely green spinach and tomato salad with peanuts

* Succulent pomelo salad

* Punchy-crunchy ginger salad *

* Smoky napa stir-fry

* Egg noodles with pork in coconut sauce *

* Golden egg curry *

Our favorite dishes so far are the ones marked with *. All of them were solid good though, to make again. I definitely love Burmese flavors, now that I understand them a bit better. Definitely different from food in neighboring countries.

What should I make next?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I received a copy of this as a Christmas gift this morning, and am very much looking forward to diving into it. It's kind of cruel to have only two days with the book before I leave for Thailand, though. :wink:


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be in the minority and, granted, perhaps I need to make a few more dishes from this book for a true judgement but so far, I've made three dishes out of the book:

chicken in tart garlic sauce - needed to add extra garlic and lime juice

saucy spiced meat and potatoes - was pretty plain and so had to add a few dollops of roasted chilly sauce from Vietnamese Home Cooking

minced chicken with galangal and tomato - made this two weeks ago and we still havent eaten it

True, only three dishes, but not one was an unqualified success without intervention on my part. Not sure yet about this book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I made the tart-sweet chile garlic sauce, and the kachin pounded beef with herbs.

Both an unqualified success - I am so psyched to cook more from this book!

Pictures in the Dinner thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kind of, though no lime juice, no toasted rice powder. The cooked steak gets pounded into the mortar and pestle with the paste until it's falling apart and laced with the other ingredients.

But the BIG difference is... sichuan peppercorns. Ground ones in the broth that the steak simmers in, toasted whole ones pounded into the paste. That part of Burma borders China and they use them.

It's the most more-ish dish I've eaten in some time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Lisa Shock
      The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
    • By Chris Hennes
      While not a new cookbook by any means, I haven't really had time to dig into this one until now. We've previously discussed the recipes in Jerusalem: A Cookbook, but not much has been said about Plenty. So, here goes...
       
      Chickpea saute with Greek yogurt (p. 211)
       

       
      This was a great way to kick off my time with this book. The flavors were outstanding, particularly the use of the caraway seeds and lemon juice. I used freshly-cooked Rancho Gordo chickpeas, which of course helps! The recipe was not totally trivial, but considering the flavors developed, if you don't count the time to cook the chickpeas it came together very quickly. I highly recommend this dish.
    • By Bickery
      Hey Everyone! I'm kinda new to all this, so excuse any violation of mores.
      Searching google for anything on Mr. Steingarten on the web led me to
      this forum. It appears te me that most of you are food professionals or
      nearly that, while i'm just a 21-yr old student who likes to cook.

      I own both Jeffries books, and i've started putting together a list of
      all the books he sort of recommends in his writing. Thus came an idea
      for this forum, wouldn't it be fun to concoct a list of say 50
      cookbooks from the world over? I everybody, and hopefully mr
      Steingarten along with them, would contribute his or hers favourote
      books, this could be very interesting.

      Due to my limited library on the subject (most cookbooks i've read are
      mom's) i shall begin by contributing my current favourite.

      I shall put it in last place, because i'm sure a lot of you will have
      thing to say on the subject.

      so:

      50. La cucina essentiale - Stefano Cavallini


      I hope a lot of suggestions will follow!

      Yours Truly,

      Rik

      (Host's Note: Thanks to eG member marmish, who has compiled a list of everything mentioned as of the end of July 2009: it can be found here. -CH)
    • By liuzhou
      I'm hearing rumours of a new book from Fuchsia Dunlop, this time on Zhejiang cuisine from the east of China around Hangzhou and Ningbo, south of Shanghai. No date or title - or confirmation yet.
    • By Droo
      I'm making the citron cream recipe in Migoya's Elements of Desserts (p318/9?).
      It says to cook the anglaise to 85 degrees, place on an ice bath then whip the anglaise. I've done that but it doesn't seem to whip (let alone to a medium peak).
       
      This is a new technique I've not tried before so I'm at a loss. Anyone have any ideas?
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.