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cteavin

Bread from the bacteria in idli

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cteavin   

Hi,

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask, but since it revolves around the bacteria used to make idli I thought I'd ask:

Are there any breads which use the bacteria that rise idli? Are there varieties of idli which use flours or other grains instead of rice?

Thanks,

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HungryC   

This isn't really an answer, but the folks at The Fresh Loaf www.thefreshloaf.com can probably answer that question. I vaguely recall reading something about the micro organisms feeding on rice in idli batter, but I can't remember where I saw it.

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cteavin   

Thanks. I did a search there (best site on the Net for bread), didn't see anything and thought I'd try my luck here.

I did search through Google but thought if there was a name in one of the many languages in India for this kind of bread, someone here might know.

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