Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Food Processor Topic


Stone
 Share

Recommended Posts

I bought a KitchenAid KFP770 on the weekend. I'd never had a food processor before, but I've got stacks of cookbooks, and many recipes that I wanted to try which called for the use of one. I decided to go with KitchenAid, because of their great reputation for quality, and also based partially on a review by Cook's Illustrated. I got the 770 because, basically, that's the only model of KitchenAid food processor sold in Australia! :rolleyes:

Anyway, I was already aware of the issue with the feed-tube safety feature, so I was prepared for that. I haven't actually used the feed-tube yet. But the thing I wasn't aware of was the leakage. :angry:

I wanted to very finely chop some chocolate callets, but I couldn't quite get them very fine. I don't even know if it's possible to process chocolate that finely and evenly in a consumer food processor with the metal blade. But as I would pulse for a few seconds, chocolate would be bouncing around and flying up around the top of the workbowl, and chocolate dust would find its way between the seam of the workbowl and top cover. As a result, there was a fine layer of chocolate dust in a 2 inch radius around the food processor. I wonder if there would be similar leakage issues with flour if I tried to make a dough, or oil if I tried to make a pesto or mayonnaise..... :huh:

Of course, having paid AU$529 for what I believed to be a top of the line food processor, only to have the contents leak on both times that I used it, has left me seriously considering returning the item and switching brands. Maybe Cuisinart? At the very least, I'm very disappointed with my experience so far with this KitchenAid product. Surely it is not unreasonable to expect a food processor not to leak when processing dry ingredients?! Leaking liquid, I can understand, since food processors are specifically designed for it, but geez......

As a food processor newbie, are my expectations too high, or should I just learn to live with the leakage?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a KitchenAid KFP770 on the weekend. I'd never had a food processor before, but I've got stacks of cookbooks, and many recipes that I wanted to try which called for the use of one. I decided to go with KitchenAid, because of their great reputation for quality, and also based partially on a review by Cook's Illustrated. I got the 770 because, basically, that's the only model of KitchenAid food processor sold in Australia!  :rolleyes:

Anyway, I was already aware of the issue with the feed-tube safety feature, so I was prepared for that. I haven't actually used the feed-tube yet. But the thing I wasn't aware of was the leakage.  :angry:

I wanted to very finely chop some chocolate callets, but I couldn't quite get them very fine. I don't even know if it's possible to process chocolate that finely and evenly in a consumer food processor with the metal blade. But as I would pulse for a few seconds, chocolate would be bouncing around and flying up around the top of the workbowl, and chocolate dust would find its way between the seam of the workbowl and top cover. As a result, there was a fine layer of chocolate dust in a 2 inch radius around the food processor. I wonder if there would be similar leakage issues with flour if I tried to make a dough, or oil if I tried to make a pesto or mayonnaise..... :huh:

Of course, having paid AU$529 for what I believed to be a top of the line food processor, only to have the contents leak on both times that I used it, has left me seriously considering returning the item and switching brands. Maybe Cuisinart? At the very least, I'm very disappointed with my experience so far with this KitchenAid product. Surely it is not unreasonable to expect a food processor not to leak when processing dry ingredients?! Leaking liquid, I can understand, since food processors are specifically designed for it, but geez......

As a food processor newbie, are my expectations too high, or should I just learn to live with the leakage?

I don't know about the new cuisinarts, but with my older ones - a DLC 7 and a DLC X, I only get a bit of flour dust wandering out of the top of the feedtube if I have a lot of dry ingredients. I have never had a lot of luck chopping chocolate in a processor, but I've never had chocolate dust leakage.

I'd take it back. Find an older cuisinart on e-bay. You might need a new bowl etc, but the motors tend to run forever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have three different sizes of KA food processors and not one of them has ever leaked wet or dry ingredients. I've had Cuisinart, and I didn't like them as much, although I understand the old Cuisinarts are pretty good. I'd take it back and get a new one. I suspect the one you have is defective.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Kerry and Marlene for your advice. I most likely will return the food processor. I don't know whether I should exchange it for a brand new model, on the chance that my particular model was defective, because I've heard of other people experiencing the same leakage problem with their 770s. Perhaps the leakage problem is a characteristic of the 770s. :hmmm:

The problem with getting any electrical appliance on eBay from America is that it most likely will not work with Australia's electrical system. Even if I used some kind of transformer or converter, the performance of the appliance would not be the same. This severely restricts the choices available to me :sad:

The only other food processor that I can find in a similar league to the KitchenAid (despite the leakage) is this Cuisinart, but I don't even know the model number to do some research with! :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Kerry and Marlene for your advice. I most likely will return the food processor. I don't know whether I should exchange it for a brand new model, on the chance that my particular model was defective, because I've heard of other people experiencing the same leakage problem with their 770s. Perhaps the leakage problem is a characteristic of the 770s.  :hmmm:

The problem with getting any electrical appliance on eBay from America is that it most likely will not work with Australia's electrical system. Even if I used some kind of transformer or converter, the performance of the appliance would not be the same. This severely restricts the choices available to me  :sad:

The only other food processor that I can find in a similar league to the KitchenAid (despite the leakage) is this Cuisinart, but I don't even know the model number to do some research with!  :rolleyes:

Cuisinart has been worldwide for a long time. Started as robotcoupe from France. I'm sure you can find one in Oz wired appropriately. Look for units with a square bottom, often called 'classic'. I wouldn't get the one you show at Peters of Kensington. Those rounded ones are the newer ones, and are more like the kitchenaid for quality.

Or you could get a Magimix!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi everyone!

I like cooking for people, and feel like a food processor could help with the process. Mainly with shredding stuff quickly (like potatoes), but I'd love to have something that can bring together doughs, especially for pie crust. I've decided on getting a KitchenAid (unless someone wants to talk me out of it :wink: )

Now, the issue is size. I'm typically cooking for 4-6 people when I entertain. Would a 7-cup fit my needs? Or should I save a little more and invest in a 12-cup model?

Any advice? (and apologies if there's already a thread on this- just kindly point me in the right direction if there is :biggrin: )

Edited by Sony (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have both the 7 cup and the 12 cup KA processors. If you're going to do dough, you're going to need the 12 cup, unless you're doing half batches of dough. The 7 cup just isn't big enough.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my philosophy is that you can always put less stuff in a bigger thing (food processor, saute pan, etc.) but you can't put more stuff in a smaller one. i think you should go for the bigger one....you will have it for a long time, and it may get you cooking more, so bigger is probably better.

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have two also - the 11-cup and 7 cup, both from cuisinart (the pro classic and little pro plus). The small one is actually quite useful for things like mincing a whole head of garlic, where the amount is just right for the small one but too small for the large one. (With the larger one a small amount of stuff tends to just stick to the walls of the blender bowl rather than force down into the blade). If you're just going to use it occasionally, and for dough, the large one should be sufficient. Almost any amount of dough you would make at home is going to be too large for the smaller model, honestly.

Don't know much about the KA, but my cuisinart is great. And once you have it you'll wonder how you ever did without it.

"A culture's appetite always springs from its poor" - John Thorne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice- JAZ, the 2-bowl feature is one of the features that put me in the KA camp.

Right now, I have a soft spot for my beat up old Oster kitchen center (if I were going to be a superhero, I'd be an Osterizer! :raz: ) But it's getting older and might need to retire soon. Hopefully not before I save up enough for a larger model!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the subject of the KA minibowl, I have to say, one irritating feature is that I find I can almost never whizz something in there without it also getting the larger bowl dirty -- usually because stuff will splash up onto the lid and then back down into the larger bowl. I also have not been as happy with the blade for the smaller bowl -- find it is not as sharp and not as strong.

Actually, if I had to do it again (I bought my KA about a year ago), I'd probably get a smaller machine like a 7 cup. In addition, if you're looking to do pie dough, a 7 cup could easily handle that. Its bread dough that you would need a larger machine for....

Just my 2 cents...

Emily

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to have a 7-cup but bought an 11-cup Cuisinart a few years ago. I found the 7-cup just too small for some tasks. That said, if/when the Cuisinart bites it, I will probably go for a KA instead.

I have the mini Cuisinart, too, but find that I don't use it; a knife and cutting board seem to do the job just as efficiently, with less to wash afterwards.

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get the 12 cup. I have the KA with two bowls and, frankly, don't like using the mini bowl at all. The small bowl sits inside the large bowl, but does not have its own lid. The large lid must be used. Click here to see what I mean.Food being processed in the mini bowl tends to fly out onto the lid and fall into the larger bowl. As I am writing this, I see that Emily_R just said the same thing! At least I know I'm not crazy and imaging things! :laugh:

My favorite mini bowl was the Sunbeam Oskar, but I haven't had one for years.

One other caution: my KA died while using the larger bowl to mix dough for bialys, per Maggie Glezer's Artisan Baking Across America. Dough got caught under the blade into the spindle thingy and froze the entire bowl in place :shock: KA provides excellent customer service, but the repair cost was over $100 (out of warranty.) If I were purchasing another large processor, I'd try to get an older Cuisinart. Hope I'm not bursting your bubble.

Ilene

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also never use the mini bowl on the KA. It's a huge pain. I have both Cuisinart and a KA mini prep, although I find myself going more and more to the KA. After having both KA and Cuisinart food processors, KA definately wins for me every time.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

This has been a really useful thread, as I am think about buying a used food processor for things like making pie crust, slicing/shredding large quantities of vegetables, etc.

This may be too vague of a question, but when did KitchenAids and/or Cuisinarts start becoming less consistent in quality? What about a machine made in 2000 (definitely older, but not into vintage territory)? I realize that there are newer machines that will last for decades, as well as vintage lemons, but I'd appreciate any advice/knowledge of track records. Personal experiences are welcome, whether posted or PM'ed.

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For some reason, I can't edit my previous entry....but in any case, I brought home a beast last night- a Cuisinart DFP-7SFP Professional. My only reservation is that it's not going to be under warranty (bought it secondhand- I have idea how old it is, but the user manual is dated 1995). I've heard that it can be difficult to work with their customer service regardless. On the other hand, I'm plenty happy about:

-capacity (14 cups!)

-interesting array of attachments (never seen a whisk attachment for a food processor....curious how it's going to work.....)

-quiet FAST function

-buying from someone local (no shipping, got to test everything)

-having something to keep me occupied on a stormy winter day when I have no intention of going out! :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For some reason, I can't edit my previous entry....but in any case, I brought home a beast last  night- a Cuisinart DFP-7SFP Professional. My only reservation is that it's not going to be under warranty (bought it secondhand- I have idea how old it is, but the user manual is dated 1995). I've heard that it can be difficult to work with their customer service regardless. On the other hand, I'm plenty happy about:

-capacity (14 cups!)

-interesting array of attachments (never seen a whisk attachment for a food processor....curious how it's going to work.....)

-quiet FAST function

-buying from someone local (no shipping, got to test everything)

-having something to keep me occupied on a stormy winter day when I have no intention of going out!  :smile:

I've brought home lots of used cuisinarts and found new homes for them. They usually run like a clock. The DLC 7 (same as yours) on my counter right now was used, as was my little pro and the DLC X I bought off e-bay for $30. The decription said it made a noise when it was plugged in, but didn't work. Putting the lid on properly solved the not working problem.

The little whisk probably won't get used more than once if you have any other mixer. It works fine on something like cream, but it's a bit of a pain. It's fun to watch it go round though.

See if you can find a copy of "The Bonnie Stern Cuisinart Cookbook" - out out of print, but a very useful book that is helpful when you convert recipes from other methods to the cuisinart. I pick up every copy I see in thrift stores and give them away with the processors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Just FYI, KItchen Aid has a $20 mail-in rebate for KA760 [$30 for KA 770] purchased between Jan1-Mar1, 2008. The mail-in "coupon" needs to be sent in by April 1, 2008.

At Amazon prices, that makes the 760 approximately $170 after rebate, the 770 about $240, post-paid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've brought home lots of used cuisinarts and found new homes for them.  They usually run like a clock.  The DLC 7 (same as yours) on my counter right now was used, as was my little pro and the DLC X I bought off e-bay for $30.  The decription said it made a noise when it was plugged in, but didn't work.  Putting the lid on properly solved the not working problem. 

The little whisk probably won't get used more than once if you have any other mixer.  It works fine on something like cream, but it's a bit of a pain. It's fun to watch it go round though. 

See if you can find a copy of "The Bonnie Stern Cuisinart Cookbook" - out out of print, but a very useful book that is helpful when you convert recipes from other methods to the cuisinart.  I pick up every copy I see in thrift stores and give them away with the processors.

I too have bought lots of the old square base Cuisinarts used and gifted them to friends, church kitchens, etc.! They are real fine machines and I like them for their many different accessory disks and other attachments.

But for real heavy duty power, I adore the used commercial Robot Coupe food processors I bought second hand. :wub:

RobotCoupeRSI3Y1FoodProcessor.jpg

ROBOTCOUPE.jpgROBOTCOUPEFEEDCHUTE.jpg

I don't know of a better food processor than these!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too have bought lots of the old square base Cuisinarts used and gifted them to friends, church kitchens, etc.!  They are real fine machines and I like them for their many different accessory disks and other attachments.

But for real heavy duty power, I adore the used commercial Robot Coupe food processors I bought second hand. :wub:

RobotCoupeRSI3Y1FoodProcessor.jpg

ROBOTCOUPE.jpgROBOTCOUPEFEEDCHUTE.jpg

I don't know of a better food processor than these!

Can I say I'm jealous? :raz: Hopefully one of these days I'll come across a RC in decent shape with a reasonable price, but for now I'll be happy with my $2.50 DLC-10E, complete with all standard attachments/blades. And its older sister, a $5 DLC-10E that only came with the chopping blade & grating blade. I'm just so glad to be rid of the el'chepo Black & Decker food processor I bought back when I was in college 15 years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...