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Uses for Powdered Buttermilk


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Thanks to the Modernist Cuisine fried chicken recipe, I'm now in possession of a rather remarkable ingredient: buttermilk powder. Sure, you can use it in your homemade pancake mix, but it adds an excellent tang to spice rubs and other savory coatings. I dusted some onto smoked ribs the other day to great effect. It got me wondering about what other uses there were for the stuff!

Chris Amirault

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I keep it on hand for cake baking, lots of cake recipes call for buttermilk as do many muffins recipes. The proportions are usually on the bag, you just add the powder with the dry ingredients and sub water for the buttermilk in the recipe.

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Thanks to the Modernist Cuisine fried chicken recipe, I'm now in possession of a rather remarkable ingredient: buttermilk powder. Sure, you can use it in your homemade pancake mix, but it adds an excellent tang to spice rubs and other savory coatings. I dusted some onto smoked ribs the other day to great effect. It got me wondering about what other uses there were for the stuff!

I use the Bob's Red Mill brand. I have only used it as a substitute for wet buttermilk in mostly baking recipes, and it does work perfectly for that. I've never thought of using it dry, thanks for the heads up. How much did you use on the ribs?

Your post gives me an idea: I think I will add some to the flour I shake fried chicken in. I soak the chicken in buttermilk before but the added tang sounds like a really good idea. If that works I'll try it on chicken fried steak.

edit: Oh, and maybe in tempura batter!

Edited by runwestierun (log)
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Chris, Saco Foods used to have a little free booklet that you could send for with the many uses of the dry buttermilk blend. The top of the can, under the plastic cover had a little fold-out paper with a coupon and a label to send for the booklet.

Now all of those recipes, plus many more - more than 350 - are on their website.

I have pulled up "Chicken" under the Main Courses category.

Just select whatever category you want and scan through the recipes listed.

From experience I can assure you that the recipe for Easy-Bake Chicken is excellent.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Does anyone know where (preferably in Canada) to buy powdered buttermilk? We used to be able to find it at the grocery store and used it frequently but last few years it has disappeared.

We used it in biscuits/scones, pancakes and other baking. Didn't think about more contemporary uses in savoury cooking but it makes sense.

Llyn Strelau

Calgary, Alberta

Canada

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I have mainly used it in homemade pancake mix for camping. If Using in biscuits, blend it with water before adding. If added to the dry ingredients it seems to leave brownish spots that I don't care for.

In our markets it comes and goes. It will be there for a year or two and then disappear for a while. They are carrying it right now.

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Does anyone know where (preferably in Canada) to buy powdered buttermilk? We used to be able to find it at the grocery store and used it frequently but last few years it has disappeared.

We used it in biscuits/scones, pancakes and other baking. Didn't think about more contemporary uses in savoury cooking but it makes sense.

Not sure where in Canada you are but in Southern Ontario it is available at Bulk Barn.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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I just use it in pancakes -- with decades-old sourdough starter that has been going strong since the Nixon administration.

Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

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Don't be afraid to buy the larger cans. The stuff is shelf-stable for years!

They say so on their website and in my experience this is certainly true.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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