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Best Home Coffee Brewers - 2009 and on...


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Moderator's Note: There have been other topics about home coffee brewers, which have been merged and closed. To review those posts, please click here.

After 8-9 years of every day service, our Cuisinart coffeemaker is not likely to last too much longer. I have not been able to find a source to replace just the one broken part, and my limited repair skills are exhausted.

We have a good espresso machine, and I am not too sure about the single cup thing-ies -- so I need something like this: a standalone electric, with an advance set timer that can make 5-6 decent mugs of coffee in the wee hours of the morning. There is plenty of room for anything. I would prefer NOT to have it also grind (that I can manage to do) since I worry that two appliances in one is twice the chance for something to go wrong and break.

They still sell this particular Cuisinart (it is a DCC-12 or close to that number). But the reviews on Amazon indicate a lot of people have trouble with them breaking down. If I have already used up my luck with this Cuisinart, I am going to need a good recommendation. Thanks!

“Cheese has always been a food that both sophisticated and simple humans love.”

M.F.K. Fisher, How to Cook a Wolf (1942)

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After 8-9 years of every day service, our Cuisinart coffeemaker is not likely to last too much longer.  I have not been able to find a source to replace just the one broken part, and my limited repair skills are exhausted.

We have a good espresso machine, and I am not too sure about the single cup thing-ies -- so I need something like this: a standalone electric, with an advance set timer that can make 5-6 decent mugs of coffee in the wee hours of the morning. There is plenty of room for anything. I would prefer NOT to have it also grind (that I can manage to do) since I worry that two appliances in one is twice the chance for something to go wrong and break.

They still sell this particular Cuisinart (it is a DCC-12 or close to that number). But the reviews on Amazon indicate a lot of people have trouble with them breaking down. If I have already used up my luck with this Cuisinart, I am going to need a good recommendation. Thanks!

Have you considered the Bunn? They don't need to be programmed to turn on because the water is always hot and pouring water into the top (after loading the grounds basket) will produce coffee immediately.

Bunn-O-Matic - how it works.

at Amazon

They did have a recall of an earlier version in 2005 but responded quickly to customer complaints and I know several people who prefer the Bunn-O-Matic to any other conventional coffee maker.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I also have a Cuisinart coffee maker with timer/clock, I've had it for 4 years and really like it alot (actually the best I've ever owned) personally I'd stick with the brand if it worked so well for you.

Good luck.

"I Love the Now"
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I am very fond of my Capresso MT500. It is very popular amongst coffee geeks due to reaching the proper brewing temperature, which few coffeemakers do.

Edited by MGLloyd (log)

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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After 8-9 years of every day service, our Cuisinart coffeemaker is not likely to last too much longer.  I have not been able to find a source to replace just the one broken part, and my limited repair skills are exhausted.

We have a good espresso machine, and I am not too sure about the single cup thing-ies -- so I need something like this: a standalone electric, with an advance set timer that can make 5-6 decent mugs of coffee in the wee hours of the morning. There is plenty of room for anything. I would prefer NOT to have it also grind (that I can manage to do) since I worry that two appliances in one is twice the chance for something to go wrong and break.

They still sell this particular Cuisinart (it is a DCC-12 or close to that number). But the reviews on Amazon indicate a lot of people have trouble with them breaking down. If I have already used up my luck with this Cuisinart, I am going to need a good recommendation. Thanks!

I can't tell you what to get but I can tell you what NOT to replace it with and that is the Cuisinart Grind and Brew. We have one and I wish it WOULD break so I could get a new (other make) one. We like our coffee hot and our machine does not make hot coffee. We always have to zap it in the microwave. You might check the Cook's Illustrated web site for their coffee maker reviews. They put a lot of testing into the products they recommend.

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We have this Bunn machine. It is really so fast that if you turn it on and go out to get the paper - you'll have ten cups (5 mugs) of coffee ready by the time you get back. It also has a pretty good warranty (3 years if I recall correctly) - and the company does honor it (our heating pad broke after a year and the company sent us a new machine pronto when we returned the broken one).

We had a cute 1 or 2 cup pod machine at a hotel we stayed at - and I was thinking of buying one until I saw that the pods - even in bulk - were about 25 cents each. That is a lot for a cup of coffee you make at home. Robyn

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Technivorm is great if you want to replace a $70.00 coffee maker with a $270.00 one. The Bunn-O-Matic is about $100, is easy to find, and makes excellent coffee.

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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I like to keep it a bit simpler and more budget friendly. Here is the one I got at Target for $30 on Saturday. I know I do not have a long term relationship but so far I like it.

I had a few specifications: a drinkable cup, programmable, auto shut off, reasonable price.

Hamilton Beach

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Does Capresso have a timer? As M. Lloyd mentioned, it is well reviewed and not costly.

If you have to settle for a more commercial brand, like Krups, get one with a thermal carafe. The main reason is not the carafe, but the fact that warming plates on the others take valuable BTU's away from the brewing pipe, and the coffee is not hot, as the OP has already experienced.

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Again, there is no need to pre-set the Bunn coffee maker by using a timer. Once it is set up, the water is always hot and ready to brew instantly.

You must have the carafe under the outflow because as soon as fresh water is poured into the top, the brewed coffee is dispensed.

These are made to work exactly the same as the commercial Bunn brewers. I have one that I use when I have several guests and don't want to use my Senseo or when I want to brew coffee to take on an outing in a Thermos.

I am pretty sure that Bunn has the best guarantee in the marketplace.

We had a big multi-serve unit at my office for several years for both coffee and tea and never had a problem.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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My only experience with Bunns has been with their commercial units, where the coffee is uniformly lousy, but that's because no one uses decent coffee in them. Maybe with good ingredients they do better. Still, I'm surprised at the enthusiasm for the Bunn. Doesn't holding water at 200F rid the water of dissolved oxygen?

My vote would also be for the Capresso MT500 (here's a Society-friendly Amazon link: Capresso MT500). Like ElsieD, I have a recent version of the Cuisinart Grind and Brew -- actually, I'm on my second, since the grinder gave out after three months. Three months into the replacement, the grinder on that one broke, too. If I'm going to spend $170 on a coffeemaker that won't grind, I want one that makes better coffee than the G&B does. The Capresso does that, and it has a timer and a very good thermal carafe.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
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Eat more chicken skin.

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My only experience with Bunns has been with their commercial units, where the coffee is uniformly lousy, but that's because no one uses decent coffee in them. Maybe with good ingredients they do better. Still, I'm surprised at the enthusiasm for the Bunn. Doesn't holding water at 200F rid the water of dissolved oxygen?

My vote would also be for the Capresso MT500 (here's a Society-friendly Amazon link: Capresso MT500). Like ElsieD, I have a recent version of the Cuisinart Grind and Brew -- actually, I'm on my second, since the grinder gave out after three months. Three months into the replacement, the grinder on that one broke, too. If I'm going to spend $170 on a coffeemaker that won't grind, I want one that makes better coffee than the G&B does. The Capresso does that, and it has a timer and a very good thermal carafe.

Or maybe the coffee is lousy because it's been sitting around for a couple of hours? I've used everything from regular Folgers to 100% Blue Mountain (the latter being an occasional splurge) with good results. My only problem with the machine is it doesn't turn off automatically. A good thing when my husband wakes up 2 hours later than I do - a bad thing when we're10 miles away from the house and can't remember if we turned off the coffee! Robyn

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Sitting around for a couple of hours is unlikely. I'm talking about businesses I've worked at, where the typical pot is emptied in about 20 minutes -- and where the predominant brand seems to be Folgers. Perhaps we just have different definitions for good coffee.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Sitting around for a couple of hours is unlikely. I'm talking about businesses I've worked at, where the typical pot is emptied in about 20 minutes -- and where the predominant brand seems to be Folgers. Perhaps we just have different definitions for good coffee.

As I'm sure a lot of people do, but since this topic is about coffee brewers, I have to say that everything I've read about the Technivorm leads me to believe that if I was to ever own an automatic coffee brewer, that would be the one.

IMO, the best home coffee brewer is a manual drip cone or French press.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Sitting around for a couple of hours is unlikely. I'm talking about businesses I've worked at, where the typical pot is emptied in about 20 minutes -- and where the predominant brand seems to be Folgers. Perhaps we just have different definitions for good coffee.

I like medium roast coffee with a fair amount of non-diary creamer and a little sugar. Mild and mellow. I must have one cup in the morning - but that's it for the rest of the day. Your mileage probably varies :smile: . Robyn

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Should one really want a unit with a timer, but also really want a Technivorm or a Bunn, is there any reason one couldn't use one of those on/off timers (the ones often used for turning on and off lights when on vacation) with a unit? Would it damage the unit or decrease its coffee-making greatness in any way?

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IMO, the best home coffee brewer is a manual drip cone or French press.

Yeah, I agree. And if you have a good thermos, there's really no need for an automatic machine. I find that full thermos keeps coffee hot and fresh tasting overnight. There's some shift in flavor, but I feel that there's a worse decline if you grind the beans 8 hours ahead of time.

I think it makes more sense to buy a cheap press pot or drip cone, and put the money into a decent burr grinder. Brewing is easy; grinding is hard.

Notes from the underbelly

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Many of the coffeemakers mentioned here draw 1200 watts and up -- beyond the capacity of units designed for lights.

But it would be cool to have a Coffee Clapper.

I think it would be even cooler to have a maid to do all that stuff for me. :biggrin:

But (and sorry if I'm being dense), if I have a timer like this one which handles up to 15 amps and allows 3-prong appliances, then it should be OK--no?

If I buy the Bunn BTX (the one with the thermos), according to the spec sheet it's 7 amps and only has 2-prongs, so the timer above should be OK, shouldn't it?

Just wondering for future reference. . .

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If I buy the Bunn BTX (the one with the thermos), according to the spec sheet it's 7 amps and only has 2-prongs, so the timer above should be OK, shouldn't it?

You'll be fine, that timer is heavy duty and can handle any household device that will plug into it. If you run your toaster and your coffee machine from the same wall outlet at the same time, you might have a problem, because those two devices combined may well go more than 15 amps. Just make sure that the total load isn’t more than 15 amps.

Or if you have a 20 amp outlet, you can go up to 20 amps total

If you are working with watts instead of amps, seven amps equals 770 watts; 15 amps equals 1650 watts (at 110 volts).

Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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