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Kerry Beal

Source of Glucose in Hungary

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I've had an e-mail from an eG'er in Hungary who is unable to source glucose (or white corn syrup).

Anyone out there know where he should be looking, or if it is called something else?

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I think unifine foods has a branch there.

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Try a pharmacy ... that's where I've found it in a pinch when I'm out of the country.

Theabroma

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Glucose is also known as dextrose if that helps at all.

Good luck!

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Glucose is also known as dextrose if that helps at all.

Good luck!

Dextrose? that rings a bell. I will look round.

and Kerry, thanks for starting up the link!

I was thinking of just making some but I am not sure how to...

robi

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Whenever I have seen 'Dextrose' in UK shops it has always been the powdered form, never, syrup so be sure what you are getting.

I know there are differences between invert sugar syrups and glucose syrup but if you cannot find the glucose you may find looking for brand names like Trimoline or just invert sugar better than nothing?

Way back when I first bought glucose for making icings it was always called 'Liquid Glucose' - I don't notice that now.

A friendly local baker/confectioner might also be willing to part with some or help with a supplier's name.

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I do see a brand called Caullet which looks europeon and is labled sirop de glucose.

Do you have any cake decorating shops around?

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I've had an e-mail from an eG'er in Hungary who is unable to source glucose (or white corn syrup).

Anyone out there know where he should be looking, or if it is called something else?

I have a jar of glucose I got from local cake supply store. Shouldn't be too hard to get. I am Hungarian as well and can give them a source once I get home and look on my cantainer for the producer or distributor.

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I've had an e-mail from an eG'er in Hungary who is unable to source glucose (or white corn syrup).

Anyone out there know where he should be looking, or if it is called something else?

I have a jar of glucose I got from local cake supply store. Shouldn't be too hard to get. I am Hungarian as well and can give them a source once I get home and look on my cantainer for the producer or distributor.

Oli!

Koszi!

Dobd nekem egy email. robidawson@gmail.com

Thanks everybody. I just asked Oli to send me an email with the info... but if he posts it here that would be just as good actually.

BTW, what is invert sugar?

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I've had an e-mail from an eG'er in Hungary who is unable to source glucose (or white corn syrup).

Anyone out there know where he should be looking, or if it is called something else?

I have a jar of glucose I got from local cake supply store. Shouldn't be too hard to get. I am Hungarian as well and can give them a source once I get home and look on my cantainer for the producer or distributor.

Oli!

Koszi!

Dobd nekem egy email. robidawson@gmail.com

Thanks everybody. I just asked Oli to send me an email with the info... but if he posts it here that would be just as good actually.

BTW, what is invert sugar?

invert sugar is just regular sugar (sucrose) that has been broken down into equal parts of glucose and fructose.

Common name of invert sugar is Trimoline. Honey can be a good substitute if you don't mind the flavor cast of the honey.

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Glucose is also known as dextrose if that helps at all.

Although chemists define glucose and dextrose as the same, recipes that call for glucose are referring to glucose syrup, aka corn syrup to Americans. Corn syrup is high in dextrose, but also has a lot of larger sugars. So dextrose would be a better substitute than sucrose (table sugar) but the recipe will need modification.

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Glucose is also known as dextrose if that helps at all.

Although chemists define glucose and dextrose as the same, recipes that call for glucose are referring to glucose syrup, aka corn syrup to Americans. Corn syrup is high in dextrose, but also has a lot of larger sugars. So dextrose would be a better substitute than sucrose (table sugar) but the recipe will need modification.

I am NOT a baker or pastry maker, I've been experimenting with dextrose/glucose for other types of savory dishes. But, my question is: couldn't you just add water to the dextrose powder and have a syrup?

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But, my question is: couldn't you just add water to the dextrose powder and have a syrup?

You could, but it would be a substitution of an ingredient with similar properties rather than an equivalent. A mixture of dextrose, maltose, maltotriose, and some maltodextrins would be a better substitute, if searching for a true equivalent. In practice, though, a dissolving dextrose in water will probably work, since the reason the recipe is calling for glucose syrup is just to have some quantity of a lower sweetness sugar.

"Corn Syrup" in America and "Glucose Syrup" abroad are true synonyms, with the caveat that some syrups (of each name) can have different dextrose equivalents. Dextrose equivalent is a measure of how completely the starch (often corn starch) has been hydrolyzed. If a recipe were to call for a 100DE syrup, then dextrose monohydrate in solution would be the same. But most recipes want a partially hydrolyzed 42DE syrup.

Here's a link that offers some explanation: http://www.arasco.com/en/products/glucose_starch/faqs.asp

There are many other links that talk about corn syrup properties, but with these you have to translate back and forth between different word choices.

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But, my question is: couldn't you just add water to the dextrose powder and have a syrup?

You could, but it would be a substitution of an ingredient with similar properties rather than an equivalent. A mixture of dextrose, maltose, maltotriose, and some maltodextrins would be a better substitute, if searching for a true equivalent. In practice, though, a dissolving dextrose in water will probably work, since the reason the recipe is calling for glucose syrup is just to have some quantity of a lower sweetness sugar.

"Corn Syrup" in America and "Glucose Syrup" abroad are true synonyms, with the caveat that some syrups (of each name) can have different dextrose equivalents. Dextrose equivalent is a measure of how completely the starch (often corn starch) has been hydrolyzed. If a recipe were to call for a 100DE syrup, then dextrose monohydrate in solution would be the same. But most recipes want a partially hydrolyzed 42DE syrup.

Here's a link that offers some explanation: http://www.arasco.com/en/products/glucose_starch/faqs.asp

There are many other links that talk about corn syrup properties, but with these you have to translate back and forth between different word choices.

That's the best explanation I've read to date. Thank you.

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hi everybody

I just found a shop that sells corn syrup by a company called Monin.

I checked out Monin's home page monin.com and could not tell if this is the same stuff because it is sold here as a cocktail drink ingedient...

I have only seen it on the shop's webiste, when I have tme I will go there and see what it says on the bott.e

thanks

robi

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