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srhcb

Bolillo Recipe

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I've just never been into grilling. When we had people over for a birthday party GF's daughter and her BF brought over their small grill to cook up some home-made sausages and some hot dogs for the kids.

The rolls they brought for the sausages were excellent. Light but chewy, with a very thin crust. I looked at the bag they came in .... "Bolillos" .... from Wal-Mart! :shock:

I figure I can make as good, or better, if I had a recipe. :hmmm:

Anybody have a favorite Bolillo recipe, or a few tips? :cool:

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Ah, Mexican breads.

Steve, here in Houston we have a lot of panaderias. As much as I love bolillos, flavorwise they've never gotten to what Peter Reinhart would call spectacular bread flavor. They are what they are, I guess.

And I think the reason is the flour that is used by the commercial bakers.

Also, they probably let it rise too quickly by dumping an extra heaping of yeast into it.

So, when you tackle bolillos in your home, here's a recommendation to use the King Arthur Bread Flour. I recently made some bread at home and then went down to our local, best panaderia to compare flavor.

It had to be the flour.

Having said that, you can find a bolillo recipe in Kennedy's "From My Mexican Kitchen". Though, all it really takes is

500 grams bread flour

320-350 ml water

2 tsp Kosher salt or 1.5 tsp regular salt

1 tbs sugar

1 tsp rapid rise yeast (SAF)

You're looking for a tacky dough, not too wet, not too sticky

I throw all into the bread machine to knead and rise on the dough cycle, then shape and bake in a steamed oven (see Peter Reinhart's baguette recipe in his "The Breadmakers Apprentice") at 500 then 450 F for 20 minutes.

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So when you tackle bolillos in your home, here's a recommendation to use the King Arthur Bread Flour.  I recently made some bread at home and then went down to our local, best panaderia to compare flavor. 

It had to be the flour. 

Thanks for all the information. :smile:

I'm a big fan of KAF, but I'll all out right now. Maybe I'll wait until I replenish my supply to try and make Bolillos.

In a bit of cultural cross pollenization, I think they would be very good for locally produced porketta sandwiches! :biggrin:

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One of my passions is a thing I call the torta hamburguesa. Another Mexican bread, similar to the bolillo but flatter, and usually shaped like the French fendu, is called the telera. This is used for the Mexican torta sandwich. It is toasted and one side is basted with refried beans, the other with mayonnaise and guacamole. Lettuce, tomato, onion and chiles Jalapenos are added, along with a meat of your choice. I use this base for my burgers and they are spectacular.


Edited by Jay Francis (log)

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BOLILLOS

To make 12 plain bread rolls:

1 oz. fresh yeast

14 fl. oz. warm water

2 tsps fine salt

2 Tbsps sugar

1 lb. 4 oz. AP flour

2 oz. lard

srhcb: Should you be interested to read the method of preparation, please notify me.

Lawrence

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One of my passions is a thing I call the torta hamburguesa.  Another Mexican bread, similar to the bolillo but flatter, and usually shaped like the French fendu, is called the telera.  This is used for the Mexican torta sandwich.  It is toasted and one side is basted with refried beans, the other with mayonnaise and guacamole.  Lettuce, tomato, onion and chiles Jalapenos are added, along with a meat of your choice.  I use this base for my burgers and they are spectacular.

Sounds a little like molletes, another wonderful use for bolillos.

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