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"The Red Wine Diet"


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Wine, tannins and health

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I do hope that at least some winemakers revert to making wines with less than 12.5 per cent alcohol and appreciably more tannins - for the sake of our health.

Roger is a medic who has published on the subject - one well known nature paper on endothelin 1

Corder R, Douthwaite JA, Lees DM, Khan NQ, Viseu Dos Santos AC, Wood EG, Carrier MJ.

Related Articles, LinksEndothelin-1 synthesis reduced by red wine.

Nature. 2001 Dec 20-27;414(6866):863-4.

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Edited by Don Giovanni (log)
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From the article:

As you may remember from the Telegraph's serialisation of my book The Wine Diet in November last year, certain highly tannic wines contain chemicals which can protect against the danger of heart disease, strokes, diabetes, dementia and possibly even some cancers.

But this isn't a licence to over-indulge. It is better to drink small amounts of wine everyday than to drink only occasionally. But it's also healthier to drink your wine with food, not without.

A frequent observation is that moderate drinkers suffer lower rates of heart disease, but only those people who limit themselves to two or three small glasses (around 125 ml) a day with food can be assured of these preventive benefits.

So far this sounds pretty good, but I don't think this guy really knows what he's talking about. As for his health findings, I don't know enough science in that field to support or refute his comments, but . . .

* He refers to some polyphenols as procyanadin. We have long referred to them in the business as flavanoid complexes called proanthocyanidin.

* He says that highly tannic wines pair well with food. I have never found that to be the case. Acidity and balance are key to wine and food pairing. Frankly, as a former wine educator, I find this claim . . . bizarre.

* He claims that "Mass-produced, modern wines are often lower in procyanidins because extraction periods are very short. Grapes are also left on the vine longer, resulting in riper fruit and higher sugar levels which, on fermentation, produces more alcohol." Actually, it is mostly the artisanal producers who push for later harvesting. Mass productions simply bring the wine in within their contractual harvesting dates and mechanically adjust the wine with additions of acid, powdered tannins, megapurple, and other additives.

* "I do hope that at least some winemakers revert to making wines with less than 12.5 per cent alcohol and appreciably more tannins - for the sake of our health." Egad. An under-ripe wine with appreciable tannin? Can he give an example of a good one? Does this guy even drink wine?

* If tannins are that critical to good health, why not drink good tea instead of bad wine? Or buy grape seed extract?

So to me, the article reads as a sloppy promotion for a poorly researched book.

There are also some procyanidin-rich wines available in supermarkets, such as Chilean vineyard Concha y Toro's delicious Casillero del Diablo Cabernet Sauvignon.

Well at least there's a plug for Trader Joe's!

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Mary Baker

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From the article:
As you may remember from the Telegraph's serialisation of my book The Wine Diet in November last year, certain highly tannic wines contain chemicals which can protect against the danger of heart disease, strokes, diabetes, dementia and possibly even some cancers.

But this isn't a licence to over-indulge. It is better to drink small amounts of wine everyday than to drink only occasionally. But it's also healthier to drink your wine with food, not without.

A frequent observation is that moderate drinkers suffer lower rates of heart disease, but only those people who limit themselves to two or three small glasses (around 125 ml) a day with food can be assured of these preventive benefits.

So far this sounds pretty good, but I don't think this guy really knows what he's talking about. As for his health findings, I don't know enough science in that field to support or refute his comments, but . . .

* He refers to some polyphenols as procyanadin. We have long referred to them in the business as flavanoid complexes called proanthocyanidin.

* He says that highly tannic wines pair well with food. I have never found that to be the case. Acidity and balance are key to wine and food pairing. Frankly, as a former wine educator, I find this claim . . . bizarre.

* He claims that "Mass-produced, modern wines are often lower in procyanidins because extraction periods are very short. Grapes are also left on the vine longer, resulting in riper fruit and higher sugar levels which, on fermentation, produces more alcohol." Actually, it is mostly the artisanal producers who push for later harvesting. Mass productions simply bring the wine in within their contractual harvesting dates and mechanically adjust the wine with additions of acid, powdered tannins, megapurple, and other additives.

* "I do hope that at least some winemakers revert to making wines with less than 12.5 per cent alcohol and appreciably more tannins - for the sake of our health." Egad. An under-ripe wine with appreciable tannin? Can he give an example of a good one? Does this guy even drink wine?

* If tannins are that critical to good health, why not drink good tea instead of bad wine? Or buy grape seed extract?

So to me, the article reads as a sloppy promotion for a poorly researched book.

There are also some procyanidin-rich wines available in supermarkets, such as Chilean vineyard Concha y Toro's delicious Casillero del Diablo Cabernet Sauvignon.

Well at least there's a plug for Trader Joe's!

Mary,

I see this type of journalism exactly what I predicted would get coverage...it's some people who delve into what's hot... wine is hot...you eviscerated the article perfectly point by point...specifically your wine knowledge seems endless and I admire that...great rebuttal...when the weather is favorable we should trade some wines...

john :wink:

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  • 4 years later...

I just got this having seen it mentioned in WS. A dense, apparently quite thoughtful book. I think it's good advice, and more about overall nutrtion and health than just "drink more red wine." Has anybody else read this, have thoughts, comments, opinions? Thanks.

"Life itself is the proper binge" Julia Child

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  • 2 weeks later...

This diet doesn't work but it just allows your body to get full and feel full though its not.

I'm curious - have you tried it and know for a fact that it doesn't work? It's essentially the Mediterranian diet, which appears to be quite healthful. It's pretty clear that red wines, especially the richer wines, are quite high in antioxidants.

"Life itself is the proper binge" Julia Child

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Personally I fear the consequenses if I started an intensive red wine diet. I've already stopped opening my mail, for fear of it being my liver handing in its two week notice :biggrin:

Sounds quite interesting though, in all seriousness.

LMFAO

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Personally I fear the consequenses if I started an intensive red wine diet. I've already stopped opening my mail, for fear of it being my liver handing in its two week notice :biggrin:

Sounds quite interesting though, in all seriousness.

I used to be on a half bottle of red wine per day regimen (with hard drinks on top of that a couple of times a week) until my liver sent me warning signals (via massive heartburn)... I feel much better now.

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