Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

lovkel

Flavored Ganaches (Fruit, herb, spice, etc)

Recommended Posts

I've noticed some people use invert sugars in their ganache.  Is this for shelf life so sugars don't crystalize?  I used to use trimoline in ice cream base.  And glucose-  for shine?

Hello to everyone and thanks in advance for the input.

Glucose inhibits crystallization and is less sweet than sucrose, invert sugar is hygroscopic so keeps things soft, but too much and they get sticky. It also inhibits crystallization. Invert sugar is sweeter than sucrose and as discussed on a previous thread can make your truffles unpleasantly sweet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok if you were to make a chai filling , would you use a chai tea base , either buy it or make it fresh ( I made some ) and use it directly as the liquid for the ganache ,hot chai tea on chocolate etc? Or make a creme anglaise and same thing? I thought I would try to make some chai tea without the water and use it as the base for the gahache and see what happend.


Vanessa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this is what you're asking, but you could infuse the cream with the chai tea (eg a teabag), and then make your ganache per usual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I steep cardamom pods, cinnamon, ginger, pepper, etc in some cream and use that for my ganache.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also purchase the chai spice powders, Williams-sonoma offer a wonderful, intense product, and mix them into the liquid portion of the recipe.

I used it to create a chai spice Italian meringue buttercream for a chocolate cake. It was the best!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rodney, please post that recipe! Wow! I promise I'll book a massage if you do!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rodney, please post that recipe! Wow! I promise I'll book a massage if you do!

HA! Ok, you are on. :biggrin:

Here is my favorite Italian meringue recipe, Dede Wilson's. If you scroll down, it is the first recipe on the list. If you do not want to use a thermometer, just set a timer to 7 minutes after the sugar and water begin to boil. At 5 minutes begin to whip your egg whites. When the timer goes off, you should be at 248F and ready to add to the meringue. Easy.

http://www.pastrysampler.com/Questions_and...buttercream.htm

For the chai, at the very end, add about 1 tablespoon chai powder to 1 tablespoon milk. You may want to use 2 teaspoons to start and taste, depending on how strong you like it. If you need more, just add a bit more to milk and add in.

Let me know how it turns out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use a product called MayaChai (http://mayachai.com/). It is an all natural concentrate that has a great flavor. We mix it directly into the finished ganache before molding.

You can even go to their website to request a sample. We are still using samples that we got from the Dessert Expo in Las Vegas last year. I think it is like $55 for a gallon bottle. We use about an ounce for three trays of truffles.


Patrick Sikes

www.MyChocolateJournal.com

A new chocolate review community

PS I Love You Fine Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you , and those little cupcakes look so cute too ,might have to try :biggrin:


Vanessa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ginger, like some tropical fruits, contain an enzyme that can break down the protein in dairy. if you use a freshly made chai mix, you may want to blanch the ginger. I'd say it's worth the trouble since the freshness (as opposed to old leaves in an old teabag) sounds like a lovely match for the chocolate.

in fact, I'm currently experimenting with chai and curry in a number of chocolate recipes (currently trying to figure out a masala-chai-creme-fraiche-white-chocolate-ganache) so please report back and I'll do the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am actually not using tea bags , but fresh black tea and spices to make my own chai tea .I did made a batch that everyone loved , but I want more punch in it,I will keep trying and report.


Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer fresh for all uses if you can get it.

As for how much, well that all depends on how strong you want it but maybe 1 tablespoon of chopped rosemary for a cup of cream?

Or a subtler approach may be one sprig the length of your hand in 2 cups cream.

I think you will have to experiment, which is, of course, the best bit.


How sad; a house full of condiments and no food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Definetely fresh!!

I also would not chop it just because rosemary is such a strong herb.

Good luck let us know how it turns out!!

I'm going to try it tomorrow, I will let you know how it turns out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

940g Valrhona Guanaja (70%)

860g Cream (35% fat)

40g Fresh Rosemary

Infuse Rosemary in boiled cream for five minutes, bring back to boil and strain over chocolate.

NB. Guanaja is an intensely strong chocolate that I find suits rosemary, and other strong flavours well. It's all subjective, but a more subtle chocolate might require less rosemary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I made rosemary ganache, I steeped fresh rosemary (full sprigs, not chopped) in heavy cream, then poured the heavy cream over finely chopped bittersweet chocolate and stirred until the chocolate was melted and the emulsion came together.

It made a fantastic filling for truffles.

I don't have exact measurements, though, because I really just threw a few sprigs into the cream and added more when I decided it needed to be stronger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You also will want to try Rosemary Caramels, they are wonderful and are made the same way, steeping fresh rosemary sprigs in the cream.

Lavender is also really good with ganache/caramels.

I also use fresh lemongrass/coconut in a white chocolate ganache.

Anyone have any good recipes for rosemary ganache?

Luis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You also will want to try Rosemary Caramels, they are wonderful and are made the same way, steeping fresh rosemary sprigs in the cream. 

Lavender is also really good with ganache/caramels. 

I also use fresh lemongrass/coconut in a white chocolate ganache.

How do you use coconut with your white chocolate ganache? Do u use coconut milk?


Edited by jdogginla (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You also will want to try Rosemary Caramels, they are wonderful and are made the same way, steeping fresh rosemary sprigs in the cream. 

Lavender is also really good with ganache/caramels. 

I also use fresh lemongrass/coconut in a white chocolate ganache.

Anyone have any good recipes for rosemary ganache?

Luis

rosemary caramels, that sound yummy. i've never attempted caramels. do you have a recipe?

luis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...