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Stephanie Wallace

Confectionery Frames

57 posts in this topic

@Jim D. check out the bottom video, that's a lot of ganache!  

 

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Posted (edited)

The video I linked to above looked ok on my phone but not my laptop, here's another using the raplette 

 


Edited by pastrygirl Damn you, autocorrect! (log)

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Thanks for the video.  After watching a couple of times, I still can't figure out why the raplette works so well, whereas a spatula turned on its edge does not.

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Posted (edited)

 

22 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

Thanks for the video.  After watching a couple of times, I still can't figure out why the raplette works so well, whereas a spatula turned on its edge does not.

It seems to be a combination of the height of it and the sides which brings the ganache back towards the middle. I've had some very small ones made at my machine shop - but they weren't wide enough or tall enough to do a good job. And also if you look at the JB Prince picture carefully you'll notice that the back is just a bit higher than the sides - so it's not scraping even with the frame - it's a few millimeters higher. 


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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