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Found 1,121 results

  1. Hi there. Today I attempted my first Szechuan Duck and it was good for the taste but the presentation and the skin far from ideal. I consulted Barbara Tropp and Irene Kuo. The recipes are the same, although Irene Kuo doesn't mention the duck air drying after steamining. I do not have access to a Chinese market so I relied on a French canette, that if I'm not mistaken is a female duck (?), the weight was just below 2 kilos. I marinated it for 2 days, then steamed for 3 hours and let dry on a rack for 3 hours. Unfortunately, I don't have a fan. My wok was not big enough to accomodate the duck so I had to fry it in a big pot. The duck was so tender, that I was afraid it would fall apart in the oil, but it didn't. The duck lost a leg when I tried to flip it over on the breast side. I didn't even attempt to fry a second time. The taste was good. But the skin, expecially on the breast side was not crispy and the duck was very very fragile. After 2 hours of steaming the duck was already tender, but after the last hour of steaming I still found a good amount of fat and liquid in the steaming bowl, so likely it was necessary to render more fat. I guess a Pekin duck doesn't have so much fat but what about the cooking time? Irene Kuo says that the long steaming is necessary otherwise the inside will not be juicy and the skin not crunchy enough... I consulted also A. Nguyen here and she steamed the duck for 2 hours. Any experience with this preparation? Thanks
  2. =Mark

    Chinese Hot & Sour Soup

    Chinese Hot & Sour Soup From Mark's Website cups chicken stock 1/4 lb julienned lean pork or chicken 2 T garlic & red chile paste 2 T soy sauce 3/4 tsp ground white pepper 4 eggs, beaten 5 T cornstarch 1 c sliced shittake mushrooms 1 can peeled straw mushrooms 1 can sliced bamboo shoots 1 can sliced water chestnuts 1 can baby corn ears 1 cake soft tofu, sliced into 1/4 inch cubes 1/4 c white vinegar 1 tsp sesame oil 1/4 c dried black fungus (cloud ears), soaked in water for one hour, drained and sliced. finely chopped scallions for garnish Preparation: 1. Bring stock to a simmer, add soy, pork, mushrooms & chile paste, simmer for 10 minutes. 2. add pepper, vinegar, bamboo, baby corn, water chestnuts, fungus and tofu, simmer 10 min 3. Mix cornstarch with 5 tbsp water and add. bring back to a simmer and pour the eggs in a very thin stream over the surface. Let stand for 10 seconds before gently stirring in the sesame oil. 4. serve with a garnish of chopped scallions. The pepper, vinegar and chile paste can be varied to taste. You're a chile-head, you know what to do! Keywords: Soup, Appetizer, Easy, Hot and Spicy, eGCI ( RG270 )
  3. Anna N

    Chinese Hot & Sour Soup

    Chinese Hot & Sour Soup Recipe courtesy =Mark 6 c chicken stock 1/4 lb julienned lean pork or chicken 2 T garlic & red chile paste 2 T soy sauce 3/4 tsp ground white pepper 4 eggs, beaten 5 T cornstarch 1 c sliced shittake mushrooms 1 can peeled straw mushrooms 1 c can sliced bamboo shoots 1 can baby corn ears 1 cake soft tofu, sliced into 1/4 inch cubes 1/4 c white vinegar 1 tsp sesame oil 1 can sliced water chestnuts finely chopped scallions for garnish 1/4 c dried black fungus (cloud ears), soaked in water for one hour, drained and sliced. Preparation: 1. Bring stock to a simmer, add soy, pork, mushrooms & chile paste, simmer for 10 minutes. 2. add pepper, vinegar, bamboo, baby corn, water chestnuts, fungus and tofu, simmer 10 min 3. Mix cornstarch with 5 tbsp water and add. bring back to a simmer and pour the eggs in a very thin stream over the surface. Let stand for 10 seconds before gently stirring in the sesame oil. 4. serve with a garnish of chopped scallions. The pepper, vinegar and chile paste can be varied to taste. Keywords: Chinese, Easy, Soup ( RG117 )
  4. Can anyone recommend a good Chinese cooking class in Beijing, Chengdu or Hong Kong? My wife and I are going to travel to China on vacation and have enjoyed these types of classes in other countries and thought there must be something similiar in China. We are looking for a half-day or full-day class. Thanks for your help.
  5. browniebaker

    Chinese Coconut Squares

    Chinese Coconut Squares Serves 8 as Dessert. Here's the recipe for the fluffy, snow-white, coconut-flavored gelatin squares served at Chinese dim sum. 2 tablespoons powdered gelatin 1-3/8 cups boiling water 1 5-ounce can evaporated milk 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon coconut extract 2 egg whites Lightly oil shallow one-quart square dish. Dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Stir in evaporated milk, sugar, and coconut extract. Cool to room temperature. In separate bowl, whip egg whites until it is fluffy and holds stiff peaks. Place bowl of gelatin mixture in a larger bowl filled with ice. As gelatin begins to chill and firm up over ice, fold egg whites in. Spread into prepared dish. Refrigerate until set. Cut into squares. Serve cold. N.B.: To avoid the risk of salmonella in raw egg whites, one may substitute the appropriate amount of pasteurized egg whites, or egg whites reconstituted from a powder. Keywords: Dessert, Pudding, Chinese, Easy ( RG962 )
  6. Many years ago in Vancouver I discovered that the Chinese restaurants there didn't try to "withhold" food from Westerners (with such famous lines as "You won't like that") as so many US restaurants have historically done, so while I was there I became a regular at a place near my hotel and pretty much feasted on all the things they had to offer and all the things in the tanks, and I certainly ate the heads-on shrimp (salt and pepper style). When it was too late and we were leaving the last night I asked the guy who had gotten to know me (as an adventurous eater) what he thought the best preparation of the live shrimp was and he said without hesitation "Egg Foo Young". So how would you do it? I mean, would they take them in and shell them, or cook them and shell them, or what would they do? I took it from the way he said it and how willing he had been all week to let me order stuff that this was a traditional preparation?
  7. Andrew Fenton

    Pork-flavored stamps

    This is why China is the greatest nation in the world: Stamps released in China to celebrate the Year of the Pig taste like sweet-and-sour pork. That is *so* much better than those Skinny Elvis stamps that tasted like... er, never mind. Edit: you can use one to mail one of these edible postcards made out of squid!
  8. Used to wait tables at a Chinese buffet in Alabama years ago. The owner had to finally ask me to cut down on eating three plates of the cold mussels... now it's summer, and I'd love to reproduce it. As I remember, the mussels were dressed pretty simply in a classic combo of flavors (soy, sesame, garlic or shallot, ginger, ?scallion, a bit of sweetness). I could wing it, but would rather draw on a traditional method. Anyone else know this one? Advice? Bupkus on Google...
  9. Wolfert

    yunan pot

    I recently read about Yunan steam cooking. When I googled images , I found one photo which is almost the same as a certain claypot used in Eastern Turkey to steam-bake bread and steam-cook poultry and meat dishes. Does anyone know where I can purchase one on line? Does anyone have the time to share some information on how to cook in this pot? By the way, I love cooking in my Korean glazed earthenware pot. Does anyone know the reason why it is totally glazed? .Thanks
  10. eatingwitheddie

    Decent chinese food in paris?

    What are best, most popular and newest Chinese restaurants in Paris?
  11. Here's the article on MSN: "Bad buzz: Chinese bloggers bash Starbucks" Starbucks bashing isn't new. But that it's happening in China is new.
  12. fido dido

    Chinese food in Italy

    I just came back from Italy and had some really delicious Wenzhou cuisine while in Florence and Rome. Has anyone had similar experiences? Has anyone eaten a meal in a Chinese home in Italy, too? Have you noticed any interesting combinations of cuisines?
  13. I find that metal spoons have an unpleasant taste, while porcelain is much more "taste inert". This is especially apparent when using the spoon to eat a soup as there is more mouth contact.
  14. Hi Everyone Anyone got good Scallop recipes they would like to share? I have 3/4lb of King Scallops -diver caught - but out of their shells. - If they were in the shells I'd steam with alittle soy and ginger.... a couple of weeks ago I had Scallops in XO sauce at aChinese restaurant in London and it was delicious - I have no XO or time to make it.... what else can you all suggest? Thanks - if it turns out okay I will photo and post! William
  15. Andrew Morrison

    North Shore Chinese Delivery

    Anyone have any suggestions for good Chinese delivery on the North Shore? Too lazy and tired for takeout.
  16. Chicken velvet (adapted from Yan Kit So’s Classic Chinese Cooking) Serves 2. 1 whole chicken breast, about 1 lb, cut into rough chunks 1/2 tsp salt 1 egg white 2 tsp ice water 2 tsp cornstarch Put all of the above into a food processor or blender and puree. Variations Instead of peas, you can top your soup with finely minced Yunnan ham. Country hams (like Smithfield Virginia ham) or prosciutto are substitutes for Yunnan ham. Instead of chicken, you can add 1 cup of fresh bamboo, julienned, and top with a little roasted sesame oil and green onions. Fresh bamboo can usually be found already prepared in tubs of water in the produce section in Asian groceries in larger cities. For smaller cities, look for cryovac packages where you find tofu. You can use fuzzy melon (mo qwa) in place of winter melon if you can’t find winter melon. Keywords: Chicken, Chinese, eGCI ( RG763 )
  17. Is Taiwanese Chinese food different in some subtle way from mainland Chinese food. Would there be a reason why mainland Chinese diners would be attracted towards a restaurant that serves Taiwanese Chinese food? Thank you all for your insight.
  18. I've spent the last week or so in a tizzy to stock my pantry full of things to make those familiar dishes from home for Christmas - shortbread, mince pies, tourtiere. There's a bit of guilt to all this, though, as I can't help but feel like I'm surrounding myself in a cultural fortress, locking out what China has to offer me. In her memoir, "Shark Fin and Sichuan Pepper", Fuschia Dunlop writes that, Am I afraid to cook Chinese food for Christmas? I can't resist a gauntlet thrown like that. I don't want to end up one of those ex-patriates that lives on off-brand boxed macaroni cheese and overpriced German muesli. I've decided to add some Chinese dishes to my Christmas dinner in celebration of my host country and the ridiculously delicious foods available here. When in Rome, etc. I don't want to make dumplings, as I won't have time, what with all the cookie baking I've got on my plate. Nor do I want to do any stir-frying, a la minute sort of dishes, as I want to hang out with my friends, not be futzing around in the kitchen bent over a wok while everyone is eating all my double-Devonshire toffees in my living room. Not that it takes a long time, but all that chopping...no. So I'm leaning towards a braised dish, like red-braised pork, as it'll have those lovely flavours of Christmas like cinnamon and star anise. I'm also thinking of getting a whole roast duck and shredding it into a salad with pomegranate, cilantro and a honey-soy-mandarin orange dressing. Fusion. And buying some dumplings. Anyone else, through custom or curiosity, adding Chinese dishes to their Christmas feasting?
  19. Any recommendations for eating in Englewood area. A restaurant where the noise level allows conversation.
  20. lmarshal1

    Chinese cooking

    I'd like a source for basic sauces used in Chinese cooking. I am retired at last, and it's time to learn how to cook! I'm looking for a light sauce that can be used with broccoli and chicken and a darker sauce (red sauce? but not sweet and sour) to be used with vegetable patties and beef stir fries. Thanks. lkm
  21. We already had 2! One impromptu one at my in-laws on Saturday coz one of the sis was going to be away during CNY. Another one, we had last nite at my parent's...a potluck. The menu was relatively un-banquety and it catered mainly for the grandchildren - 9 of them. We started off with Yee Sang brought/bought by my tai go. This is the pic before "lo hei". This is "during"... and this is "after" We were late so I had to make a quick job of the photo-taking...excuse the quality. Mushroom/veggie dish made by mom Seafood soup with every exotic sea-creature in it made by mom Sweet sour fish fillet made by yee so Deep-fried wantan made by mom and some grandkids Pak cham kai (white chop chicken) made by mom to be taken with Yee Cheong always makes Teochew duck but this time he made braised trotters Since it was my sis's hubby's bday the next day, she made a carrot cake DH and I had a jelly challenge. He made cendol agar-agar while I made lychee agar-agar with big sago balls and kwei feh lychee liqueur. Guess who won? My yee ko made this tong sui, called "mat du yao", it really has 'everything' in it from gingko nuts, red beans, sea coconut, tiny cubed sweet potatoes, longan, lotus seeds.... This year, they seem to be introducing a tiny kam/mandarin orange (next to tong sui). They are quite sweet and cute, and supposedly doesn't give the sup yit effect. After the heavy meal, we went for a walk to the night market (pasar malam in Malay) and bought these neen go in banana leaves. The one on the left is trimmed. 2 down, one to go. The actual in-law do will be on the eve itself. I'll be making braised abalone with mushroom and fatt choy. Soooooo...what are you having? Edited: wrong image was inserted.
  22. on the sichuan peppercorn thread i made reference to the san gabriel valley near los angeles as the ground-zero of chinese immigration and cuisine in north america. here's an article from 1999 in the atlantic--i apologize if it is has been linked to and discussed here before. it verifies that the area has the largest immigrant chinese population in the u.s. more importantly it illustrates why anyone in the u.s who is interested in experiencing a full range of chinese cuisines but cannot go to china should plan a trip to l.a http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/99jan/chinese.htm
  23. canucklehead

    Clay Pot Rice

    I am craving clay pot rice with cured meats... and would like to try to make it at home. I had always assumed that you cook the rice as per a normal pot (high heat to bring to a boil and then very low heat to cook through). But I've seen pictures of clay pots with jet engine burners at very high heat for claypot rice. I want to have a good amout of crunchy bits on the outside - so is high heat necessary? When do you turn down the heat?
  24. Is it common to have the New Year's zodiac animal be a primary or featured ingredient in a New Year dinner? Certainly some exceptions would have to be made, e.g. dragon as it is mythical, dog as it is socially unacceptable and tiger as it is endangered.
  25. Daznz

    Dipping Sauce ?

    Hi everyone im from New Zealand . I would like to say this forum is out standing I really love cooking and im really starting to enjoy chinese cooking ive struggled to make good chinese at home until i got mrs Chiangs Szechwan cookbook off ebay for 90c and i have ordered The Chinese Kitchen by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo . I am making Shrimp balls the dipping sauce she calls for it a salt and pepper mix I would like to have two more dipping sauces on the table, If anyone can help me out with two sauces that will go well with shrimp balls i would love the recipes Thanks Dale
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