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  1. Yah, yah, I'm sick, it's supposedly end stage cancer, I'm going through total skin electron beam radiation, blahdiblah blah... Here's the important thing. I NEED a decent pickle. I do not want to meet the end (or face the fight against an end) without having savored, at least once more, a delicious-perfectly pickled-puckery-garlicky-yet-not-overpoweringly-so cucumber, even if it isn't of my own manufacture. I have NO energy. I AM fussy about my pickles. The plebian yet enjoyable BaTampte isn't going to cut is this time. Where can I send a well meaning friend in the Freehold area to acquire this lovely for me? I prefer a more than slightly green pickle, a well pickled, but still light and crisp pickle, where the flesh hasn't greened as yet. Garlic is a must. Vinegar is a no no. Brine is the all important base. Can any of you NJ experts assist me? My friend is ready for action at any time.
  2. I reached into my fridge today, knowing that there was one, and only one, of the lovely kosher dills left in there that I was craving, and low and behold there was a mother floating in my pickle jar! It looks healthy, a little dark in the center, and very intriguing. I can't believe it grew in the fridge, and am a little suspicious. OK, who knows if this is good to use? I have read up on vinegar making, but never actually done it myself. The kosher dills are very garlicy, will that corrupt the mother? Not that I object to a little garlic in my vinegar. Also, can I eat that last pickle? I have been saving it a couple of weeks. I'm sort of excited. It feels like foraging to me, almost, and maybe fate is telling me that now is the time to start my vinegar making experiment. Some treasures just pop up in the most amazing places. I have a source for some very nice vinegar jars. Anne
  3. I followed the recipie for making jam on from Alton Brown available here. In the process I measured out 24 fl. oz. of blackberries instead of 24 oz by wieght and my jam did not set. So now I've got a bunch of runny preserves, is there anyway to correct this and boil it down some more or something to get it to set? It's still useable but id rather it be spreadable and not so liquidous.
  4. When looking over some dried cherries and blueberries yesterday, I wondered if they could be reconstituted and made into preserves or jams. I've made a few things like this, and can't, off the top of my head, think of any reason it wouldn't work. But "few" is a key word. I'm interested in hearing the thoughts of more experienced preserve, jam, and jelly makers.
  5. As far as I can tell -- and, believe me, I've been working hard to disprove what I'm about to say -- this is the very last bottle of Inner Beauty Real Hot Sauce on the planet: I became a fan of Inner Beauty two decades ago, when Chris Schlesinger brought his grillin' and BBQin' to Cambridge MA at East Coast Grill. After a while, this legendary hot sauce (mustard-based, with fruit, spices, and habaneros) started appearing in grocery stores throughout NE and became a big hit on the burgeoning hot sauce circuit. It was my go-to hot sauce, and I probably went through a bottle every couple of months during the heyday. But then, for reasons that I've never understood (nor, honestly, been told), Schlesinger stopped making the stuff. It started disappearing from market shelves, so in the early oughts I bought all I could find and hoarded it. Well, until I ate it all, too quickly. See, I was confident that I'd find little caches here and there if I looked hard enough, but for two years I came up empty. I also tried making it based on some recipes floating around, but, well, it's not the same. I gave up hope. Two years ago, while on a trip to visit family in -- of all places -- Bisbee, Arizona, we ambled into a gift store to get a few cold Cokes on a blistering July afternoon. Lurking on the shelves of that tiny store, next to gew-gaws and bric-a-brac, were the last two bottles of Inner Beauty in the world. It took me nearly two years to make my way through the first bottle, and I'm now into the second, and last. I don't know how to think about it. How do you eat the very last of something in the world, something you've treasured for most of your adult life? Do you have little dribs and drabs, spread out over years? Or do you consume it with verve and pleasure, the way it was meant to be enjoyed? The whole concept puts me in an existential dilemma that I have faced, largely, with confusion. Has anyone had a dilemma like this themselves -- or are you in one now? What did -- do -- you do?
  6. Kudos to Chef Celina Tio, of The American Restaurant, for being named the James Beard Foundation's Best Chef of the Midwest.
  7. First this is a general inquiry about high quality good tasting dark chocolate in UK for eating. We know about Green and Black's which is made in Italy. Second, have you heard, or do you have web site for James Chocolate , Evercreech, Somerset, BA 4 6LQ. They have some wonderful tasting chocolates with rose, lavender, etc that someone gave us but they do not remember where they got it.
  8. A European food import company near my house had an outlet sale this weekend and I picked up some interesting things I hadn't tried before. Among the interesting jars was Pickled Walnuts in Malt Vinegar. I had heard of pickled green walnuts before, but hadn't seen them until now. I popped open the jar as soon as I got home and tried some. Hmm... tastes like malt vinegar with some texture. I couldn't really taste the walnuttiness. I tried soaking a few in water for a few minutes, but really I don't think I'm experiencing pickled walnuts properly. So what are pickled walnuts supposed to taste like? Are they all looks (round and black) or did I get a sub par brand my first time out?
  9. I am looking for a recipe. I got from someone a jar of Jalepenos pickeled in a sweet soy sauce brine. It was amazing. Crunchy, sweet, salty and hot. I couldn't stop eating them. Now they are all gone and I don't have a recipe for it. I don't know the Korean name for it but the this soy sauce based sauce is also used to pickle other vegetables (e.g., garlic). I would really appreciate the recipe. Thanks in advance... Soup
  10. Parents across for a couple of days next week, and taking us out for dinner Wednesday. They're staying in St James and had booked a table at Quaglino's, as Dad had walked past a couple of times and thought it looked small and intimate (!) and it's got two red forks in his Michelin, which apparently means that it's 'particularly welcoming'. I swiftly disabused him of its diminutive size and intimacy, to which he suggested that I book something instead. First thought was L'Oranger, but haven't been for years and concerned that it might get a bit pricey. Second thought was Le Caprice but also haven't been for years and concerned that it's not particularly welcoming (for non-regulars). Having been lurking for a long time, I know what an opinionated bunch you all are (although less so without Simon M's input), so can anyone either comment on the two choices noted, ideally based on recent experience, or suggest something else. Would really like to keep it to £300-400 for dinner, with a modest attack at the wine list. ta
  11. OK, so I made a cocktail this eveing (a White Lady for those keeping score at home), and I shook it perhaps too vigorously, and I can't get the bastard open now. I have whacked it hard several times, and no joy. Any tips or tricks to free the Lady from her glass and steel prison?
  12. Here is a link to a recipe for Mustard Pickles, which is the same recipe that my family from Maine makes *except* our recipe uses white sugar rather than brown, and all the pickling ingredients (which of course is everything but the cucumbers) are heated together till everything blends well, then cooled before pouring over the cukes. (The vinegar to be used is either cider or white - I prefer cider.) There is nothing like a Maine Mustard Pickle that I know of. A taste to remember.
  13. I really miss Frank's Red Hot Sauce. I use it to make the hotwings I grew up with. Other hot sauces I can find easily in NY are not doing the job. Anyone know where I can buy it in Manhattan? Thanks folks, Grace
  14. Somewhere I read about an expansive jam from Britian, can't remember where I read about it (Here? Gastronomica? The Saturday Evening Post?) but a woman described it as teeny tiny whole strawberries and oh-so-delicious. Cannot google myself into it . . . The preserving thread, which captivated me yesterday, made me remember it. Can you help me?
  15. I have been invited to a Cinco de Mayo party and asked to bring an appetizer for 6. I don't think it has to be Mexican, but I would like to bring something either Mexican or Southwestern in flavor or spirit (or at least South of the border). I don't want to bring salsas or guacamole or anything so predictable. Most of the interesting things I can think of need last minute attention, like fritters or gorditas etc. I like the idea of a shrimp seviche, but it looks messy to eat standing up. Any ideas on presenting a seviche for a cocktail-type party are welcome. I would like something that could be served room temperature and be prepared in advance. It doesn't have to be "authentic," just taste great and suitably impress . Also, I don't have time to experiment. I would like something you have made before. Too much to ask?
  16. Made lamb curry the other night, using Jaz's recipe. After seeing the price of Major Grey's chutney, I decided to make my own : bought about $8 worth of mangos, some golden raisins and spices. I made over a quart for about $10. And it was really , really easy and tasted great! Anyone else make chutney regularly, and if so, what kinds?
  17. ok, in every asian grocery i go to (mostly vietnamese, in my neighborhood) there are always these vacuum-sealed packages of pickled mustard. like tofu skins, green tea, chinese sausages and tofu, there are always big boxes of these. so i bought some, and i'm not sure what to do with it, in part because i don't know what it tastes like. also, today in the store i saw another package of it that said in big letters THIS PRODUCT MUST BE COOKED BEFORE EATING. but this package doesn't say that. and the recipes i've found all over the web don't say that. i know i have to rinse and/or soak it to get some of the salt off, but that's about it. anyway, what do i do with it? what does it taste like? thanks for any help.
  18. My dad called and wants a recipe for eggless mayo -- I am not sure how to make it. I found some stuff on google with soy milk.. does not look appetizing at all. He can use regular milk if needed .. just does not want to use eggs.... any suggestions.. Also if this has already been covered here somewhere please just send me the link.. I tried a search but could not find anything thanks
  19. Kent Wang

    Jellyfish

    From the Only a Chinese would eat it thread, I learned that the Chinese aren't the only ones that eat jellyfish. The Chinese usually prepare it by chopping up the jellyfish head into small strips and serving cold, sometimes mixed with radish(?) which also has a crispy texture. How do other cultures prepare it?
  20. I've never been able to figure out why foodies tend to despise ketchup. Like just about any condiment, it has its applications. If you don't like it, there are a million other condiments out there. The same goes for Worcestershire sauce and barbecue sauce, deli mustard and honey mustard, pickle relish and mango chutney, and jarred salsa. Why ask why? Just enjoy it for what it is. Maybe I'm weird for liking ketchup. I also will eat pickle relish straight out of a jar. Ditto for hoisin sauce. Soba PS. In the omuraisu thread in the Japan forum, Hiroyuki asks pretty much the same question, ao I thought I'd ask all y'all.
  21. Hey, A recent comment in the hot-dog thread combined with some other posts I have read around make me wonder if I don't have some odd views on the use of mayo. I will come out and admit it, I find mayonaisse to be a wonderful comment suited for just about any and all situations. Hot dog? gotta have some mayo, same with a cheeseburger (or a cheesteak for that matter), or pastrami on rye, or a rueben, peanut butter on toast, or liverwurst and onion. Really, as far I'm concerned there is nothing that mayo doesn't go with. Heck, it is even the perfect topping (along with tons of vinegar) for french fries. What possibly bizarre and strange uses for mayo do you have? How do you enjoy it most? Do you make it yourself, or are you just as happy with storebrought? Let the emulsified love-fest flow.
  22. Not that the issue of the South and butter has been explained I'm turning my attention to fruit preserves, Southern style. Unlike the preserves I've grown up on, a lumpy sweet slurry that easily spreads on toast. Jack McDavid, at Jack's Firehouse in Philadelphia, first introduced me to what I assume is the Southern approach to preserves - a thin sweet syrup with large chunks of fruit. Since then I've seen such preserves throughout the South, most recently at Monell's in Nashville. The chunks of fruit are indeed tasty. I spoon them out of the syrup and gently balance them on a biscuit half. Sometimes they don't full out en route to my mouth, staining my shirt. But the syrup pretty much goes to waste. What am I not getting? What's the proper way to apply Southern style preserves? Why are they so, what we Yankees would call, watery?
  23. A few days ago I posted a topic over in the Special Occasions forum. Next week I need to make Jelly doughnuts / jam-busters on TV. Now - it's been a few years since I've made them - but after tested a couple of recipes, then tweaking, I've come up with my own recipe that I like very much. My question involves the logistics of it all. I need to be at the TV studio at 6:45 in the morning. I figure I'll have a dough ready to go so that we can roll and cut them - but I think I should take some rounds ready to go (proofed again). Does anybody have any suggestions on how to best do this whole thing? I just put a few rounds in the freezer - can I do that the day before and just pull them out in the morning when I leave? Will they rise and fry well? Any thoughts? For filling them, I've tried a couple of things - the best thing that's worked for me is to cut a little x at one end with a pointed knife, then use a pastry bag with a small, plain circle tip to insert the filling. If anybody has any suggestions to make this work smoothly I'd appreciate it. Tip and ideas welcome.
  24. hi just got back from holiday in Hong Kong and had one of my favourite desserts there. I'm back in london and am in seperate need of it. 桂花果凍 桂花 jelly "gwai fa go" ? osmanthus jelly? "Kwai hua" jelly? "Quan fa" jelly? can't find anything google . anyone know how to make it? got a recipe pretty please
  25. Much like cookbooks, what the world needs now is many fewer restaurant critics. Over the next week, it’s my goal to ensure that you talk me out of my job, while I, meanwhile, try to talk you into it. So to speak. In other words, I want you to ask me lots of questions. My life doesn’t hang in the balance of my next review, something that I’ve been doing professionally for the past 15 years. But from writing about restaurants I’ve also come to know the food service business quite well, I suppose. And behind the swinging doors lie much bigger stories, especially of the collaboration of chef, farmer and fisherman; distribution; cross-cultural influences (Vancouver, where the culinary DNA is still knitting itself together, is a fine laboratory to observe that in); the collusion of wine with food; and more recently, the necessity of sustainability, especially as it relates to the global fishery. This week I’m going to eat my last Russian caviar. Ever. No, restaurant reviewing would be much less interesting if I couldn’t write about these bigger stories. So I hope that I can transmit to you how the research works, how the writing gets done, and ultimately, lend a sense as to how culinary cultures--born from diversity--emerge with a sense of their new locality. We’ll be covering a considerable amount of real estate across this big, raw-boned place: • We’ll begin today In British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley Wine Country and for the next two days and nights look in on some agricultural history (in an attempt to track the area's culinary evolution) and wineries, cook with chef Michael Allemeier of the Mission Hill Family Estate Winery (braised boar cheeks will be featured at a Friday night dinner party with some wine folks) and a revisit to a restaurant to demonstrate our review process and methodology. • On Saturday I’ll return to our home in Vancouver—where we have some friends joining us for a little seasonal cheer, ‘Seven Hour Sacrificial Lamb’ and ‘Cheesier-Than-Mariah Carey Scalloped Potatoes.’ • On Sunday morning we’ll be flying to the wild outside coast of Vancouver Island to the ecotourism town of Tofino, which is about an hour’s flight in a twin engine aircraft. Once there we’ll be looking in at coastal cuisine from the pans of chef Andrew Springett at The Wickaninnish Inn and, in a more casual vein, at the construction of excellent fish tacos at Sobo. • On Monday we’ll be returning to Vancouver to go behind the scenes at pastry chef Thomas Haas’s (he was the opening executive pastry chef at Daniel in Manhattan) lovely production facility, and observe John van der Liek at the Oyama Sausage Factory, which carefully produces more than 150 products. We'll aslo track the history of a new restaurant, from development menu to opening night and review. • Through the balance of the week we’ll look inside many more professional kitchens and markets, hopes and dreams. I’m sure we’ll find a few other things to do too. Once again, I very much encourage your questions. Last night, the Ice Wine harvest was supposed to start. In order to trigger that, Vintners' Quality Alliance reguations demand the temperature must stay at or below -8 degrees Centigrade through the entire pick, which can take a while. Anything else is just Late Harvest fruit. Alas, there was a slight inversion off the lake yesterday afternoon and it was called off. So we stoked the fire and rolled back into bed. But now I’m off to pick up some croissants down the hill at La Boulangerie. We baked some Irish soda bread yesterday as well. I’ll make some strong coffee when I’m back, and begin to tell you a little more about this disturbingly beautiful place . . . Welcome, Jamie Image: On the Beach - Okanagan Lake last afternoon, 1530 hours.
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