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  1. I have been combing through this forum's handful of long bacon threads looking for any leads on producing really crisp oven bacon. Besides baking on a rack (which I despise washing), has anyone found a way to do this? My goal is bacon that shatters to the firm touch but is still relatively uncolored (tan/red not brown). I've gotten it a few times in the past but haven't been able to reproduce it lately. When I have been successful, it's been with low temperatures (<250 f.) for a long time (2+ hours) but these days that formula is giving me bacon that's dark brown and chewy (can't even cut it with fork!). Any ideas?
  2. Combine the three different candles to make a BLT! Ben p.s. there is a bunch of other great bacon related stuff on this site.
  3. In the Nathan's Famous thread http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=34814 wesza said: I always was impressed with the many varieties of Sausages available that were actually made in Japan. They even had a excellent Hot Dog that was made from Tuna that was comparable to a Hebrew National Frank that was used as the model at the Japanese owned Factory located in Taiwan. It was amazing how similar in taste and texture they tasted to compared to the real thing. Wonder if they are still available. Irwin
  4. It's probably the combination of the frigid weather, the bag of new-crop lentilles de Puy in my cupboard and the bottle of Madiran (Château d'Aydie '95, which should be hitting its stride about now) in my drink-soon queue, but I've suddenly developed a major hankering for one of my favourite winter combo, duck confit with warm lentil salad. The problem is the duck. Back in the good old days, Boucherie de Paris, the little butcher's shop on Gatineau across from the former HEC building, sold the best confit de carnard I've ever tasted anywhere. After a quarter hour in a hot oven, it would emerge all golden and crispy-skinned and falling-off-the-bone tender. The meat had a texture somewhere between unctuous and silky and a mild yet deep, dark flavour with salt and fat in perfect balance. Had he done nothing else, then-butcher André Philippot would have earned my eternal gratitude for this triumph of gastronomy. (In fact, he did much more. I first learned of the shop when Bee McGuire proclaimed it the winner of the Gazoo's toulouseathon, its search for the Montreal's best toulouse sausage. André's terrines were also works of art.) Alas, the Philippots sold their shop a decade or so ago and retired who knows where. And while the new owner does some things as good or better, confit isn't one of them. (Neither are the toulouses; I suspect the main problem is his decision to cut back on salt and fat in deference to les goûts modernes, as he once put it.) It's not that his confit is bad, it's that it's not great. So, finally getting around to my question, who in your opinion now makes the best duck confit in the city? Although I'm mainly interested in retail outlets, please feel free to mention any restos that do a bang-up job. Thanks!
  5. I have a confession to make. I've never used my meat grinder. It just lurks in my cabinet, glaring at me from behind the box of coffee filters. Am I a bad person? And if I wanted, say, to make sausage, what kind is good to start with? Do you have a favorite recipe? Chad (snacking on last night's andouille cornbread, mmmm)
  6. Does anyone have a non-pork suggestion as a substitute for pancetta? I have a recipe which I want to make, but my wife doesn't eat pork. It's a pasta dish which involves browning the pancetta until nice and crispy, and then using the fat in the rest of the dish. So I need some kind of meat which will accomplish a similar task. I guess I won't be able to get the exact same flavor, but I'd like to try something at least. Any ideas? Thanks! ~WB
  7. I adore sausages. The ancient alchemy of rescuing and transforming meat that would otherwise be unappetizing into delicious luvly sausages is surely one of humanity's greatest achievements. Luvly, luvly sau... Um. Do you like sausages? If so, what is your favourite? What is the best way to prepare them?
  8. I have been craving biscuits with sausage gravy. I can figure out the biscuits, but can't find anything about how to make the gravy. Anyone have any ideas or places they can point me? I thank you in advance. My arteries - not so much.
  9. Last night I tried out Arthur Swartz's recipe for pasta fazool. He's fairly insistent that one brown whole sausages by starting the sausages in a cold pan with a bit of oil & then browning them over medium-low to low heat. The fresh sausages I used were "arced" so it was quite difficult--but still enjoyable--to keep moving the sausages at weird angles in order to get the middle & ends of the sides that were arced. Any techniques to make browning whole "arced" sausages easier?
  10. I *love* bacon and in the last year and a half, I've come to truly cherish good bacon. Now I love my bacon to have a 50/50 ratio of fat to meat and I cook it so it has crispy edges but is still semi-flaccid. I'd like to know where everyone else goes when they want the best bacon pigs can proffer. I'm not talking about the national brands that are really thin like Oscar Meyer. But as far as national brands go (it suppose it could be regional), Fletcher's is pretty damn good and it used to be my favorite. Another plus is that's available at most grocery stores. Now I've tried the primo deli bacon from A & J's on Queen Anne and I found it to have too much meat and not enough fat, resulting in tough and chewy bacon, more like a slice of ham instead of bacon. I've also had the deli bacon from Central Market in Shoreline and although beautiful was as dissapointing as A & J's. At the moment my favorite bacon is from the Fred Meyer deli. I've bought some from the Lake City Way store and the Ballard store and their bacon (in my humble opinion) is the standard by which all should be compared to. But it seems odd that such good bacon should come from such a lowend store. I'm not saying that FM is a dump, I love the Ballad FM, but I would imagine that specialty shops and high-end grocercies should in principle have better bacon. Where does everyone else go?
  11. Short of purchasing a professional deli slicer for several hundred dollars, devoting half your kitchen counter space to it, and spending an hour cleaning its parts after each use, what options are there for cutting deli meats super-thin? Even with my best knives, I can't do it. Can a sushi chef do it? Is it even possible to do this without a rapidly spinning blade? Is there some cheap device I don't know about that accomplishes the task with aplomb, or even without aplomb? Of course you can get things sliced when you purchase them, but in my experience they degrade rapidly once sliced. So I'd love to be able to do it to order at home.
  12. I made a quick chicken confit this Sunday. Here is an idea of the recipe: curing chicken thighs for an hour or so straight in the baking dish that holds thighs snugly; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin down; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin up; roasting them in 450F for 20 minutes or so skin up until skin is browned and crackling. The end result is divine. Now here is my question about this thing that is left after confiting. There is a layer of fat and whatever other pan juices. It's really a pity to throw this away. But how can i use this stuff? Thank you.
  13. A day without bacon is like a day without bacon.
  14. Halibut & Bacon Serves 2 as Main Dish. 1 lb halibut fillet 1 tsp oil 3 bacon slices 1 garlic clove, sliced salt pepper Spread the oil on the bottom of a baking dish. Salt and pepper both sides of the halibut and place in dish. Place the garlic slices on top of fish. Top with bacon slices. Bake in a 425 oven until it's done (about 10 minutes). I use the convection fan so that the bacon crisps up nice. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish ( RG219 )
  15. Blue Cheese Creamed Spinach with Pancetta Serves 4 as Side. This is a popular side at our place. It serves four moderately, 2 generously. 4 slices of pancetta 1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped 1 T pine nuts 3 oz cream cheese 2 oz blue cheese or similar 1/2 tsp salt 6 oz baby spinach, washed and patted dry In a large, heavy frying pan cook pancetta till crisp but not brown. Remove pancetta from pan, reserve. Add onion to pancetta fat in pan, saute until transparent. Add pine nuts, salt and cheeses. Stir a bit, 1-2 minutes, then add spinach. Stir untill spinach is wilted and chese is completely melted. Serve immediately, topped with reserved pancetta slices. Keywords: Easy, Vegetables, Side ( RG870 )
  16. Pasta con Broccoli Rabe, Pancetta e Pignolia Serves 6 as Main Dish. This is what I made for the eGullet pasta feast in Raleigh, NC, on 2/7/04: Ingredients 2 bunches Broccoli Rabe 1/2 head of garlic, peeled and chopped 1/4 c. olive oil, plus more as needed 1 tsp. crushed red chile 1/4 c. pine nuts 1/4 lb. pancetta Aged Asiago cheese 1. Make or procure some flat, wide-ish pasta, whatever you like. 2. Toast pine nuts in 400 degree oven or in dry skillet, taking care not to burn. 3. Crisp pancetta and set aside to cool, then crumble. 4. Blanch broccoli rabe, squeeze out excess liquid, and chop coarsely. Mince larger stems. 5. Heat olive oil over low to medium heat, add chopped garlic and saute until garlic looks cooked through but not brown. 6. Have pasta almost ready at this point, i.e. about 2 minutes more cooking time. 7. Put chopped rabe in saute pan, mix with garlic and add crushed chiles. When pasta is cooked through, drain and add to pan. Mix thoroughly. 8. Plate pasta, garnish with toasted pine nuts and crumbled pancetta, and grate asiago on top. Drizzle with EVOO, if desired. Yum! Keywords: Main Dish, Italian, Appetizer, Dinner, Intermediate, Vegetables ( RG864 )
  17. Chipotle Bacon Cornbread Serves 6 as Side. This started out as just a scaled down version of Rachel Perlow's Skillet Cornbread With Bacon. I made a few changes along the way and the results are significantly different, hence the new recipe. This is for an 8 inch skillet. You could get away with using a 9 inch, but the bread will be thinner. Note: This is VERY spicy. If you can't handle the heat, seed the peppers. 5 slices cooked bacon, chopped 3 chipotle peppers, chopped – seed for mild 3 T butter 2/3 c yellow cornmeal 2/3 c flour 1/2 tsp tsp baking soda 1-1/4 tsp tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt 1/4 tsp black pepper 1-1/2 T sugar 1 c buttermilk 1 egg Mix peppers and bacon. Set aside. Put butter in 8 inch cast iron skillet and set skillet in oven. Preheat oven to 350. While oven is preheating and butter is melting, mix dry ingredients in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, mix buttermilk and eggs. Gently add buttermilk and egg mixture to dry ingredients. Stir only until moist. Batter will be lumpy. Stir in bacon and chipotle mixture. Remove hot skillet of melted butter from oven. Pour cornbread batter into hot butter. Bake for 20 minutes. Keywords: Side, Hot and Spicy, Bread ( RG451 )
  18. Venison Sausages Inspired by this book -- Charcuterie, the art of smoking, salting and curing, a whole bunch of us have become obsessed with home smoked bacon, homemade and stuff sausages, dry cured items, etc. Many of us have taken parts and parcels of the recipes and come up with our own creations. You'll find out about our obsession on this topic: Charcuterie My father-in-law gave me two deer this season. Recognizing that the freezer is not a safe deposit box, and recognizing that venison and sausage are a natural, this is what I did. I wanted something quite different from what most meat markets here do with venison and sausages. 3-1/2 lb diced venison, all tendons and sinew removed 1-1/2 lb diced pork back fat, skin removed 1/4 c minced sage (packed) 2 T toasted fennel seeds 1-1/2 T granulated or minced garlic 3 T Morton's kosher salt (scant 3 T.) 1/2 c diced dried cherries 1 c red wine 10 feet hog casings 1. If your casings are dried and packed in salt, remove 10' from the package, rinse with water. Open up the opening and flush water down through the casings. Soak in water in the fridge overnight. 2. Soak the cherries in wine for a couple of hours. Drain, reserving wine. Put wine in fridge. You'll want the wine to be very, very cold! 3. Combine venison, fat, sage, fennel seeds, garlic, salt and drained cherries. 4. Follow instructions in the book to grind, bind and stuff. Make sure that everything is as cold as possible as you grind and bind! You could also just grind and bind and fry the sausage as patties. These sausages were wonderful grilled to an internal temperature of 150 (F). Keywords: Main Dish, Intermediate, Game ( RG1716 )
  19. Chicken and Sausage Gumbo It all started when I went to the meat market this morning and bought 3 lbs of chicken thighs. These are not Tyson's Plastic, but real chicken cut by real butchers. They are very good. I got 2 lbs of Richard's Pork Sausage and made a couple of stops to fill my vegetable needs. Sausage from Richard's is great --looks like cased ham! This stuff is just awesome. If you can get it I highly reccomend it. They make (imho) the best commercial pork products in the US. For a photo play-by-play, click Here. And, here's the definitive EG thread on Gumbo. Gumbo cooked 'round the world. 3 lb chicken thighs 2 lb pork sausage sliced, into about 1/4" coins Dusting: 2 c flour 1 T salt 1 tsp paprika 1 T cayenne powder 1 tsp cracked black pepper Peanut oil Roux: 1/3 c all purpose flour 1/3 c peanut oil Trinity 2 green peppers (one green and one red or yellow), diced 4 ribs celery, diced 2 medium onions, diced 8 cloves of garlic, minced 1 T dried basil 1 T dried oregano 2 tsp cayenne 2 tsp black fine crushed black pepper 1 T salt 6 c chicken, turkey or pork stock Partially skin the thighs (I like to leave a little fat, adds to the flavor when browning). Dust with spiced flour. Brown the dusted thighs in peanut oil. I like peanut oil as it can take a pretty good beating, adds a nice nutty taste, and you can get it very hot without burning. Turn once and hardly move while they were browning. Remove thighs and place on paper towels. Brown the sausage coins. I like to get it a little toasty. It adds both flavor and texture to the dish. Time to make the roux. You may wish to review my photo essay (linked above) to see the process as it colors. The pan has been drained, but not scraped after the browning of the sausage and chicken. It is placed over very high heat (wide open on a normal burner, Flour and oil added; this mixture is stirred constantly. Scrape up the remainder of the meat as you go. Scrape hard and get it all loose or it will all burn and you will have to start over. First you will have the light roux. Sort of the color of a skinned almond. Medium Roux. Very light brown. At this point I have been stirring about 5 minutes. It is getting very hot. WARNING-This method of making Roux was popularized during Paul Prudhomme's stay as Head Chef at Commander's Palace in New Orleans. The kitchen staff came to call this type of roux "cajun napalm". If you splash and get it on you it will stick to you and burn you badly (if you try to wipe it off while it is hot the burn will just spread) so BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL. Dark Roux. Darker brown; approaching Hershey's chocolate syrup. Now we've gotten there. At this point (maybe 10 minutes in) the oil is just starting to smoke a little bit and I am ready to stop the process. Onion, celery, bell pepper and in. This stops the browning process with the flour and the oil. Stand back as you dump-it can be a pretty lively thing. You are, after all, pouring hot water into oil. At this point I have just mixed the veg and the roux evenly. The bottom was carefully scraped, as were the sides. Then I add the garlic and I turn the heat to medium low and slowly simmer with the top on, stirring and scraping occasionally. By adding now these spices will incorporate nicely with the veg mix and basically melt into the mix. Getting the veg to the right point will take about 15 minutes. Now is the time to add the garlic. Taste at this point and adjust spicing. (some like it hot, some not. I find that with this type of gumbo I do not prefer it so spicy. The veg, sausage, and especially the chicken all stand out on their own and don't need to be bammed to heavily with spice-but as always it is a matter of personal choice) Add 6-8 cups of stock, the chicken, and the sausage. It is all stirred well and brought to a boil while uncovered. Once it hits a boil, let boil for 5 min or so on low boil, cut the heat back down to medium low and simmer for one and a half hours with the lid on. Skim fat occasionally if you wish. There will not be much grease if you did the first two steps right and bought quality sausage. About ten minutes before finish of simmer time, add 1/2 cup coarsely chopped parsely and 6 or 8 chopped green onions (tops and bottoms). Ready to plate. Yessir Buddy! That's the stuff I was looking for (I wouldn't have showed it if I had screwed it up). It is a very nice color, thick but not too, and has a nice spicy tang to it while not being overpowering. You should be able to taste the veg, chicken, and sausage nicely and the three really are working together the way that they are supposed to. A nice spicy tang while not overpowering. Fit for Royalty. A bargain at any price. Keywords: Soup, Main Dish, Intermediate ( RG1186 )
  20. Chicken & Sausage Gumbo We call this "South of I-10 Style" This is a very basic gumbo that I learned many years ago from a dear lady in LaPlace, Louisiana. She was quite an authority on gumbo and its many styles. She and her far-flung Louisiana family put a lot of energy into “discussion” of one style versus another. This dark and sultry style is a favorite for poultry and sausage of whatever type. We made up the term “South of I-10 Style” because she claims it is more prevalent the further south you go. Turkey is often the bird in question after Thanksgiving. Duck often shows up after a successful hunt. It is not a thick gumbo, due to the very dark roux losing some thickening power in the process, and the vegetables just about disappear. File is often offered at the table for addition to the diner’s liking. The recipe is a good starting point. Endless variations are possible. I have included some techniques that might help achieve that dark roux. 1 c vegetable oil (peanut or canola) 1 c flour 2 c chopped onion 1 c chopped celery 1 c chopped green bell pepper 1-1/2 tsp salt 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (or more to taste) 6 c chicken broth (hopefully homemade but Swanson brand will do) 1 lb smoked sausage (kielbasa or andouille) cut crosswise into 1/2" slices 2 tsp Cajun seasoning (your favorite brand will do) 1 lb chicken meat cut into 1” chunks (best to use thigh meat) 3 bay leaves Chopped green onion, parsley, and file for serving (optional) White rice for serving (NOT optional) About the pot: Don’t even start this unless you have a proper pot, that means heavy. Heavy cast iron is the classic. Enameled cast iron (like Le Creuset) is better because it is easier to judge the color of the roux. Heavy aluminum like Calphalon also works. First you chop your Trinity: Chop the onion, celery and peppers into relatively uniform ¼” chop. Season with the salt and cayenne and set aside… close to the stove. (You will see why in a minute.) Now you make a roux: Combine the oil and flour in your pot and stir together until there are no lumps. It should be liquid enough that it flows well as you stir. Add more oil if necessary. Turn the heat to medium high on a wimpy range or maybe medium on a better burner and start stirring. I recommend using a wooden spatula rather than a spoon as that tool does a better job of sweeping the bottom and corners of the pot. Oh, by the way, you can’t stop stirring so you best go pee before you start this. I call this a “2 beer roux” That means that you can drink 2 beers before it is ready. I find that it takes me about 30 to 40 minutes to get there, but then I have done this a lot. Better to go slow until you gain some experience. When the roux gets to the color of a Hershey Bar, you are ready to go. WARNING: The slightly reddish Hershey Bar color is very close to burning. If black flecks appear, you have burned it and blown it. Start over. Makin’ Gumbo: Dump the seasoned Trinity into the roux all at once and stir like crazy. That is why I told you to keep this by the stove. If you are getting close to burning the roux, this drops the temperature and keeps it from burning. There will be a lot of steamin’ and sputterin’ going on but this has a lot to do with the flavor development. The high heat hitting the vegetables and cayenne makes a flavor difference. Continue to stir and cook for about five minutes until the vegetables are wilted. Add the sausage and bay leaves, continue stirring and cooking for about five minutes. Slowly add the broth (it should be cool) stirring continuously to incorporate. Reduce heat and maintain a slow simmer for two hours, uncovered, stirring occasionally. In the meantime, season the chicken meat with the Cajun seasoning. Add it to the pot and simmer for another hour, stirring occasionally. Excess oil may break out. Skim off if you wish. Check seasoning and add salt if necessary. Serving: Stir in chopped green onion and parsley and serve over white rice. File on the table for adding is optional. NOTE: You can use commercially available roux. (It is really quite good.) The trick will be to get it up to a high enough temperature to sear the trinity/cayenne mixture without burning it. I think making the roux yourself is more fun. It tests your intestinal fortitude… “How close can I get to burning before I dump in those vegetables?” You can double this recipe if your pot is big enough. I usually do because this is a bit of trouble and it freezes well. If you freeze leftovers, add the parsley and green onion only to the portions you serve. Parsley and green onion should always be added fresh. If you are using previously cooked bird, such as the leftovers from the Thanksgiving turkey, add the cooked turkey meat within the last half hour of the process. If you cook previously cooked meat in the gumbo too long it gets all broken up and stringy. It will still taste good. It is just ugly when that happens. Hopefully, you have made good stock with the bird bones. If it was smoked bird, remove most of the dark smoked skin before making the stock so the stock won't have too strong a smoke flavor. For a truly fascinating experience of gumbo cooking around the world, the Gumbo Ya Ya Cook-Off topic is not to be missed. Keywords: Main Dish, Intermediate, Chicken, Lunch, Dinner, American ( RG772 )
  21. Beef sausages Serves 8 as Appetizer. Most recipes for homemade sausages are centred around pork. For those who don't/can't eat pork this is a good alternative. Becuase beef tends to be drier than pork this requires a relatively high fat level. I was advised by Len Poli at http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index.htm to work on the basis of at least 30% fat, personally I found even then the sausages were a bit too dry so I upped it a bit, I go for just under 50% of the weight of bola in fat. The onion will also help with moistness. 500 g Bola/beef shoulder 240 g Beef fat 100 g Onion 20 g Salt 2-1/2 g Pepper 1-1/4 g Smoked pepper 1-1/4 g Cumin seed powder Collagen sausage skins as reqd The recipe makes 16 sausages, based on sausages of approx 10cm long. Put the bola and beef fat into the freezer to cool but not freeze. When cold combine chunks of bola and fat and mince. Try to use a proper meat mincer as this will give the desired texture. Finely dice the onion and prepare the seasoning (salt, pepper, smoker pepper and cumin seed powder. Combine onion, seasoning and mince beef and fat in a bowl. It is worth heating a pan and cooking a patty of the mixture for taste. Alter seasoning if required. A word of warning - the minced meat with onion and seasoning will be left to sit in the fridge overnight so the tastes will change slightly. Ideally the mixture should be left in a fridge overnight, at the very least it should be placed in the fridge to cool down before it is stuffed into the sausage skins. To stuff the sausages follow instructions on your mincer/stuffer. When it comes to cooking the sausages place them in a hot pan/griddle/grill and turn the heat down relatively low and cook for a long period of time. Sausages are not steaks that cook quickly. Give them time to cook, don't hurry things. Keywords: Kosher, Intermediate, Beef ( RG1379 )
  22. i'm considering a duck confit quesadilla of sorts for the superbowl festivities. prolly with a fruit (mango) salsa, as duck likes sweet fruits. i'm having a hard time coming up with a cheese or cheese blend. i'm of the opinion that cheddar or even jack will overpower, or at the very least, won't compliment the duck. a brief search on google returned Oaxaca cheese, which is a white cow's milk cheese (from mexico of course of course). but i'm thinking i won't be able to locate this on a sunday in NJ. any thoughts on what kind of cheese duck confit might like? no cheese perhaps? a fruit puree instead? i dunno. help a guy out, could ya?
  23. I used to get great bacon mail order from Thielen's in Minnesota, but they don't ship out of state any more. Any suggestions? Thanks.
  24. This is a product that has been mentioned in various threads here, but I don't think it's ever had one of it's own. This is a shame, because it seems intriguing. It promises the ability to do charcuterie and/or dry aging of steaks without a specialized room or curing chamber - just bags - all in your refrigerator. However like many products, their marketing lacks detail and it's difficult to discern exactly what is being claimed. But basically, the main product consists of specialized bags that will allow moisture out, but nothing else in (like oxygen). And another thing called a VacMouse - which is important in some way that is never totally explained. But the basic idea is that you're going to cure your meat in a standard way for 1-2 weeks and then vacuum pack it in the Dry Bag with the help of the VacMouse using a typical FoodSaver device. Then you just put it in the refrigerator on a rack and wait for weeks or months. Then you have bresaola, capicola, prosciutinni, lonzino, etc. After watching some online videos and doing some web searches, it appears that this may be a very useful thing - with some caveats.... First, dry aging of steaks seems to be a major marketing focus. But it looks like they're taking some criticism from dry aging enthusiasts who point out that without the exposure to oxygen, dry aging isn't really taking place. They are aging, and they're drying, but not with all the benefits of the traditional process. Yet, they do have some support in the form of positive reviews on various sites. For the same reasons, no one is going to challenge Parma for the best cured ham bites using this product. That's just a given. But it could offer something in between. And I'm not ready to build my curing chamber just yet. So I ordered a kit and it arrived today. It will probably be months before I know anything further, but I thought I'd relate what I've found so far. And I hope people who have used it will chime in. I'll have some waiting to do. The particular charcuterie kit I ordered from Amazon (I was using Amazon bucks) was 24.99 plus $8.99(!) shipping. For this I received 5 dry bags, 6 VacMouses, a packet of Instacure #2, and a packet of juniper berries - all packaged frugally, but practically, stored in an elongated ziplock bag between a cardboard brochure. It hardly seemed to justify an $8.99 shipping charge (although perhaps that was Amazon). Anyway, the good news is that after I examined everything, it all went back into it's original packaging without any fuss and awaits its call to duty. So, besides the cure and the spice, we have plastic bags and VacMouses. The plastic bags are apparently special because they will let the moisture out with out letting any of bad stuff from your refrigerator in. The VacMouses appear to be some sort of plastic fabric that make up for the fact that the bags do not have the channeling that FoodSaver bags do. Apparently, they will (along with the recommended crinkling of the neck of the bag) will take the place of those channels until they are sealed shut by the heat of the element. (and again by the recommended second sealing). It all seems plausible, and I feel supported by many wonderful pics on unaffiliated forums of beautifully sliced meats. But then again, I paid nearly $7.00/bag (including spice, and cure, and shipping). If you buy meat at $2/lb and put in a $5 bag, some calculations have to occur. But, of course, we're competing with the cost of high price specialty items or investments in curing chambers. Well, I guess we'll see.... (sorry for the long post, but I wanted to include all the information I wish I'd found upon learning of this product - as opposed to having to all the searching myself. And, also, I could be wrong in anything I have said. I haven't actually used the product.)
  25. Hey,so I made capicollo few weeks ago,and for drying I got small Danby fridge,I placed some water with vinegar inside,turn the fridge up so in the end the temp was like 6-8 C,and humidity 90% and the thing still dry more on outside,forming dark harder layer what am I doing wrong? Thanks.
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