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Robenco15

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Everything posted by Robenco15

  1. Hey Chefsteps is back and the content is great. Really really happy to see it.
  2. I have just the kitchen manual on my xmas list. That’ll be enough to cook any of the dishes. I think there are pdfs online to browse through the other volumes.
  3. Yeah in my haste to reply I skipped over how useful the velveting technique is. Not complicated either.
  4. This is an interesting topic as I just bought a 160k BTU outdoor wok burner and a round bottomed wok. I've been using it for about 2 weeks now with a lot of success and some burnt rice. I purchased Grace Young's Breath of a Wok and Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge and both are very helpful. I also joined her Facebook group called "Wok Wednesdays" and it has been nice getting feedback directly from her and the others in the group. That being said, the book was written for a standard home stove, not the outdoor high power burner. She has already given me ways to adjusting the recipes in terms of how they will react to the high heat. Things like not needing to have very dry vegetables, not needing to sear meat for a minute in a single layer, not adding the aromatics first as they will burn, etc. I find the books show me the order I need to build my stir-frys and obviously provide recipes as I'm unfamiliar with some of the building blocks of stir-frying. Like others said though, it's about doing it over and over when it comes to stir-frying and learning how to build each dish, what goes in when, etc. etc. I'd recommend both books. They both offer a lot of background insight and other useful information. Breath of the Wok is probably the one to start with if you only get one. I initially got SFTTSE figuring it was the newer and better version, and it is great, but I'm finding BoaW to be more of an education.
  5. Thanks. I’ll give it a go on that Alps table.
  6. Last q, I promise. Do you put anything underneath the burner when using it on the table? I’m assuming the table can handle some weight? Think burner, 36qt stockpot, clambake, etc. Thanks!
  7. Thanks! I’ll look into exhaust paint. I do plan on setting the table up and breaking it down but good to know it can withstand the elements for a period of time.
  8. Thanks jmolinari. I was actually referring to the table btbyrd recommended, but that's good to know about the burner. I'd keep it inside when not in use too.
  9. btbyrd, do you leave it set up outside, or only bring it out when needed. I’m assuming it is fine in the elements, but curious.
  10. I knew you’d have a great answer. Thank you!
  11. With legs- $45 for shipping. Comes to $175 total. Not awful, but yeah shipping is high. Without legs - $39 for shipping, $150 total.
  12. I might just open my grill and set it on the grates. Eventually we plan on redoing our back patio and then I’ll have a table for it. I might also buy it with the legs since they are detachable. Store the legs away and then have them if I need them.
  13. Thanks so much for your reply! I found something extremely similar to the Rambo on outdoorstirfry.com and will probably be going with the legless 160k BTU burner. I’ll get that first and then if I’m finding it not easy to boil water for clambakes or whatever, I’ll buy another one for that. I’m going to go with legless to make it easier to store, but that means I need a table. Any ideas there? A Gridman SS table? Ideally it would be easily put away when not in use as I can’t leave it outside 24/7. That would eliminate the Gridman. I also figure some form of protection needs to be under the burner. Paver brick?
  14. Bringing this topic back. I want to do outdoor wok cooking, but I also want to do outdoor deep frying, clambakes, etc. Is there a consensus on whether there is a burner out there that does both well? Or do I really need to own two separate devices? That Auscrown Rambo does look good and not too big.
  15. Robenco15

    Dinner 2018

    Pillsbury Croissant dough. ChefSteps recipe. Easy to do and comes out perfect.
  16. Robenco15

    Dinner 2018

    Happy New Year!
  17. Robenco15

    Breakfast! 2018

    The pudding could be used in a number of ways and amounts to cut the richness too. It’s a wonderful little recipe.
  18. Robenco15

    Breakfast! 2018

    The pudding is made by blending eggs, egg yolks, salt, melted butter, and milk together and then cooking SV for 30 minutes at 74C. You then take the cooked egg mixture and blend that to a pudding consistency. The omelette is made putting a lid to an 8” pan in a 350 degree oven and then blending eggs, an egg yolk, heavy cream, and salt together. You put some of the mixture in an 8” pan, put the lid from the oven on top of the pan and then put the pan in the oven for 5 minutes. Then you take the cooked egg sheet out of the pan and fill it with the egg pudding and roll the sides over the pudding. Cut in half. Take picture to show people. Eat as much as you can because the thing is so damn rich you might not be able to finish it.
  19. Robenco15

    Breakfast! 2018

    MCAH Omelette with Scrambled Egg Pudding
  20. Robenco15

    Breakfast! 2018

    Ham and Cheese Omelette
  21. Toyama 300mm Kasumi Sujihiki 8” #500 Sieve In My Blood cookbook
  22. I’m a big Alleno fan and have been wanting to do this for awhile. He makes sauces from vegetables and meat by cooking them sous vide and then cryoconcentrating them with a centrifuge to extract the pure flavor of the product. I don’t have a centrifuge so I made it work without. Started with 1kg of Celery Root and 600g of water and seeled it with my FoodSaver. Then I cooked it for 12hrs at 83C. After that it comes out and cools for 2 hours before straining through a #200 sieve. That liquid goes in an ice cream maker until it freezes and becomes a grainy ice mixture. I put that mixture in a chilled bowl strainer over a pot and put it all in the fridge. As it thawed, the celery root extract thawed quicker than the water, leaving the water in the strainer and the extract below in the pot. After over 24 hours I put the ice in the strainer in one freezer bag to re-freeze and thaw again and the extract in another bag to re-freeze and thaw again. The taste is incredibly pure celery root with a bit of a minerally flavor. It lasts a LONG time on the palate and has some thickness to it. Actual time I had to spend doing anything was very little. Still a lot of time for not a ton of yield, but absolutely worth it to me. Can’t wait to concentrate the flavor further and pair it with a dish or two.
  23. Oh I know where to buy it. I'm saying I'm surprised this is the first mention of it on eGullet (that I could find) considering it looks to be one of the best cook books released this year in the Restaurant Chef category. I mean, check out the recipes on his site (https://chefbobech.com/). The Turbot with Fennel Ravioli and Gruyere is unbelievably simple in its ingredients and uses such a creative technique. I already know I'll be making that come January (with a substitute for the Turbot unless I'm feeling $$). Same with the Raw Langoustine, Hibiscus, and Yuzu. It is refreshing to see dishes made with only such a few ingredients elevated to such heights with such creative techniques.
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