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chocklateer

Napolean Cake

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I have a client who wants a Napolean cake for his wedding cake. He described to me a cake that sounded similar to a napolean slice(or mille feuille): pastry cream layered with puff pastry (several layers tall)...no actual 'cake' is involved. He said it was a traditional cake in his family. I googled Napolean cake but didn't come up with much. Anybody have any suggestions/ heard of this cake before?

Thanks in advance,

D.

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I would just think the arangement would need to be similar to a cupcake arangement where the portions are already sliced. Then y'know have a pretty stand and decorate it accordingly, like a cupcake wedding cake display would be decorated. I think I would want to get creative with the slices so they arrange better. Like triangle shape for a round stand and squares as opposed to the usual rectangle cuts for a square stand.

I also think I would recommend a dessert table or groom's cake for that and a real cake for the wedding. Even a small one, just for looks, just for pictures and memories. Napoleons just aren't very bridal or feminine which is what the cake generally is all about.

Napoleons are hard enough to eat by yourself. Can you just see them feeding each other a bite? The picture would make for a great laugh. If they go through with this, provide them with two bite size pieces in a mini muffin wrapper (like for candy) so they don't screw it up.

My plan A would be to talk them out of it.

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I have a client who wants a Napolean cake for his wedding cake. He described to me a cake that sounded similar to a napolean slice(or mille feuille): pastry cream layered with puff pastry (several layers tall)...no actual 'cake' is involved.  He said it was a traditional cake in his family.  I googled Napolean cake but didn't come up with much.  Anybody have any suggestions/ heard of this cake before?

Thanks in advance,

D.

I have seen this 'cake' somewhere. I have a ton of cakebooks, but I'm thinking it was on the cover of a mag recently (w/in the last yr.). I can see it in my head. Give me a day or 2 to try to find it. It may have been a variation of a dobage'...I know that dobage is unique, but I'm refering to the technique and the filling rather than the 'cake' layers. Southern living maybe?? I can't search their site because you have to be a current subscriber, but maybe someone here can. In the meantime, I'll check my mag. backlog. Good luck.

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It is called a millefeuille in French. You could make a small one for presentation and then cut the rest in slices in the kitchen.

Here is what it looks like:

Milllefeuille


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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It is called a millefeuille in French. You could make a small one for presentation and then cut the rest in slices in the kitchen.

Here is what it looks like:

Milllefeuiille

That's it, except the picture I saw was at least 4, possible 6 layers, and the filling wasn't as thick in between. Easy enough to do if the client insisted on more layers, don't you think??

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It is called a millefeuille in French. You could make a small one for presentation and then cut the rest in slices in the kitchen.

Here is what it looks like:

Milllefeuiille

That's it, except the picture I saw was at least 4, possible 6 layers, and the filling wasn't as thick in between. Easy enough to do if the client insisted on more layers, don't you think??

Just looking at it from a traditional wedding cake perspective, I think it would be a nightmare. I mean unless it's a very small reception or if it's completely untraditional and they just want dessert. But I didn't see this in the magazine. Maybe it's the next trend. :huh:

Or maybe I need to get out more.

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It is called a millefeuille in French. You could make a small one for presentation and then cut the rest in slices in the kitchen.

Here is what it looks like:

Milllefeuiille

That's it, except the picture I saw was at least 4, possible 6 layers, and the filling wasn't as thick in between. Easy enough to do if the client insisted on more layers, don't you think??

Just looking at it from a traditional wedding cake perspective, I think it would be a nightmare. I mean unless it's a very small reception or if it's completely untraditional and they just want dessert. But I didn't see this in the magazine. Maybe it's the next trend. :huh:

Or maybe I need to get out more.

I agree, it'd have to be served pretty fast. The layers would need to be much thinner if it were more than the 2 shown in the picture, and I'd see how it'd hold up frozen first.

I'd go with dobage', it's traditional for the groom's cake around here. My husband had 2..one chocolate, and one lemon. yummmy.

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are you sure he isn't thinking of one of those layered crepe cakes that Megan is so fond of?

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My client described it to me as a cake or cakes which could be tiered like steps which I take to mean staggered display pedestals. He's talking about a whole cake(s)- not slices-the likes of which I've never seen or heard. I can't imagine cutting through layers of puff and pastry cream to serve it in a dignified & appetizing manner...never mind the bride and grooms first cut. And he definitely did say layers of puff pastry...not crepes...too bad because I've been wanting a reason to try out the crepe cakes.

Highchef, what you describe as a mille feuille but with more layers and less filling sounds like what my client is describing. If you find that picture I'd appreciate it.

BTW, what is a dobage cake?

Thanks everyone for your input ....I'll keep looking and if in the meantime you have any more suggestions I'd appreciate them!

D.

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as usual, I misspelled. It's doberge. If you google doberge cake, then go to images you will see the layers. It's a very traditional N.O. thing, and is an absolute favorite for groom's cakes. We always buy them, but anyone who has the time and inclination can certainly make them. It's a wee bit easier I imagine than making puff pastry. I haven't googled for recipes yet, but the images are there so the recipes must be too.

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My girlfriend had a similar cake for her daughter's Christening. Looked like a sheet cake, with a smaller one on top.

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Napoleon cakes are pretty popular in the NY metro area. I haven't had one in a long time, but my recollection was that they were a giant napoleon - usually 3 puff pastry layers with pastry cream in between, fondant glaze or sometimes whipped cream on the top and whipped cream on the sides. The ones I had were rectangular in shape and the same height as a napoleon so that they could be more easily portioned into normal napoleon size. They were very messy to serve and I agree they'd be difficult to do in a wedding cake format

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Here's a picture I have from a class I took :

http://panidolce.wordpress.com/files/2006/...illefeuille.JPG

To get the perfect cut, the chef cut the top puff layer before putting it on the completed layered pastry. He proceeded to cut the slices after that. We at the pastry with a fork (just like how you use a chiffon fork to cut a chiffon cake).

Yum!


www.obsessions-life.blogspot.com

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Here's a picture I have from a class I took :

http://panidolce.wordpress.com/files/2006/...illefeuille.JPG

To get the perfect cut, the chef cut the top puff  layer before putting it on the completed layered pastry. He proceeded to cut the slices after that. We at the pastry with a fork (just like how you use a chiffon fork to cut a  chiffon cake).

Yum!

Forgot to say that he used a serrated knife to cut.


www.obsessions-life.blogspot.com

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We used to make a lot of Lemon Napoleon Cakes for pastry tables (even in the restaurant when it was open). For some reason it wasn't a problem to cut them - I'm trying to remember why.

We also used a serrated knife - dipped in hot water and wiped clean. I also think it's important to let it sit in the cooler to set up long enough before trying to cut it. Yes, some of the puff will soften a bit, but if the puff layers are thick enough, it's not a problem.

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as usual, I misspelled. It's doberge. If you google doberge cake, then go to images you will see the layers. It's a very traditional N.O. thing, and is an absolute favorite for groom's cakes. We always buy them, but anyone who has the time and inclination can certainly make them. It's a wee bit easier I imagine than making puff pastry. I haven't googled for recipes yet, but the images are there so the recipes must be too.

How about a Dobos torte? It's traditionally layers of cake (baked one by one), filled with buttercream and has a layer of burnt sugar on top.

Someone posted a recipe on an eG thread which I can dig out if you want.

Pam R, if you can think up how to slice napoleons neatly, please please post. I'm planning on making only minis this weekend, but it'd be great to know anyway.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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as usual, I misspelled. It's doberge. If you google doberge cake, then go to images you will see the layers. It's a very traditional N.O. thing, and is an absolute favorite for groom's cakes. We always buy them, but anyone who has the time and inclination can certainly make them. It's a wee bit easier I imagine than making puff pastry. I haven't googled for recipes yet, but the images are there so the recipes must be too.

How about a Dobos torte? It's traditionally layers of cake (baked one by one), filled with buttercream and has a layer of burnt sugar on top.

Someone posted a recipe on an eG thread which I can dig out if you want.

Pam R, if you can think up how to slice napoleons neatly, please please post. I'm planning on making only minis this weekend, but it'd be great to know anyway.

Yes, you can see by the google pictures when you search for doberge cake, that's exactly what it looks like. I suppose we use the creole french version of the spelling, I'm sure it's pretty much the same cake. HOWEVER...the one time I searched out a recipe, and this may have been a fluke, it required slicing the layers. The cake layers were not cooked individually. I have made individual cake layers for other cakes, but they were only 4 layers as compared to 7 or 8. I guess any deviation on a recipe allows for it's own name after all!

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Could somebody tell me what a groom's cake is? :huh: Is it just for the groom? Does the bride have one too? Where is this common practice? I've never heard of it!

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Could somebody tell me what a groom's cake is?  :huh:  Is it just for the groom? Does the bride have one too? Where is this common practice? I've never heard of it!

I've made groom's cakes in Chicago area and here in the South but it is generally considered a Southern thing, or at least of Southern origin. The bride's cake is the traditional wedding cake, the groom's cake can be anything. It is often chocolate on chocolate with tuxedo strawberries or a monogram or both. It can just as easily be a sports theme, or a sculpture. It's often a 'this is your life' type cake. Maybe a lighter theme than the grand bridal cake. Sometimes they are multitiered as well. Sometimes they are served at the rehearsal dinner which is the evening before the wedding.

The servings from the groom's cake plus the bride's cake can be combined to make the total for servings needed or sometimes they order enough so each guest gets a serving of both.

Cheesecakes are popular for groom's cakes and can be tiered. But that's why I suggested a napoleaon 'cake' for the groom's cake.

It's great for the decorator because that's more cake that gets ordered.

We need to start a trend for 'divorce cakes'. Job security! :laugh:

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Oooooh, I like it! The top tier looks like the husband or the new girlfriend or the husband's prized porsche and comes with a mallet for smashing. The bottom tier comes with one big spoon for eating on the couch.

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Oooooh, I like it!  The top tier looks like the husband or the new girlfriend or the husband's prized porsche and comes with a mallet for smashing.  The bottom tier comes with one big spoon for eating on the couch.

Ahh yes the birth of the divorce cake "for a sweet beginning, baby".

:laugh: <clapping>

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Chocklateer

I agree with Kate, this sounds like a nightmare to serve. However, if it's what they absolutely HAVE to have.....I'd go with mousseline instead of pastry cream as a filling. It's much more stable and way nicer to cut. That's what we use for the millefeuille pastries at the bakery where I work.

Love the idea of the divorce cakes. I actually saw this guy once driving around in his car honking the horn etc with streamers and a sign saying "Just Divorced" on his bumper. :biggrin:


Edited by Teri Everitt (log)

If only I'd worn looser pants....

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Could somebody tell me what a groom's cake is?  :huh:  Is it just for the groom? Does the bride have one too? Where is this common practice? I've never heard of it!

Nah, it's for everyone! Just like the wedding cake. It's just on a separate table, and a bit off to the side away from the wedding cake. It's traditionally served after the wedding cake is cut, as a sort of after the garter is thrown type of thing. I don't know...that's just how we do it!..The guys do do toast when the grooms cake is cut, but mostly it's a 'guy' thing, and we learn about it 2nd, 3rd hand what's said. I think, at least in our case, the cutting was a post bachalor party bye,bye type of thing that they did whenever they cued on that they all wouldn't be missed for a moment or two. Then they'd do a quick cut and toast and drink....and whatever until the girls come back in before they cry. Ah, yes. Manly tears...

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We used to make a lot of Lemon Napoleon Cakes for pastry tables (even in the restaurant when it was open).  For some reason it wasn't a problem to cut them - I'm trying to remember why.

We also used a serrated knife - dipped in hot water and wiped clean.  I also think it's important to let it sit in the cooler to set up long enough before trying to cut it.  Yes, some of the puff will soften a bit, but if the puff layers are thick enough, it's not a problem.

When you eat a Napoleon you are suppose to lay it on it's side so all the filling does not squeeze out as you eat it.

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