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eG Foodblog: donbert - Roll Your Own...


donbert
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I do love the swine aka the "magic animal". :laugh:

Speaking of which anyone want to go for the Momofuku Ssam bar whole berkshire pork butt on Friday after cocktails? So far I think there are 5 people interested. That means we still could use 3-5 more people.

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I got the Double Soul Food Mix which is Bratwurst and Berliner Currywurst with red cabbage, sauerkraut, onions, german fries and a roll.

gallery_28661_3975_97820.jpg

I thought you said you didn't eat any veggies!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Thank you for blogging. It promises to be a fun read.

I only know this recipe for dulce de leche, have you a different one?

Poke hole in can of sweetened condensed milk (scm)

Bake at 200F for 24 hours.

I've never tried to make it before, but bought the ingredient yesterday with that in mind, so was delighted to see your mention of making it.

I've noticed some brands scm are thicker than others, and I'd think thicker would be an advantage. Anyone know for sure?

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Excellent to see a fellow Columbian blogging about NYC.  I credit Columbia with my introduction into foodieness as well... the meal plan was so poor that I got off of it in my second semester of freshman year and started shopping at UFM (RIP), Mama Joy's (RIP) and the West Side Market (RIP)... I don't know what a similarly afflicted Columbian today would do without those fine markets around in the neighborhood.

/Also lived on 8th fl of Wallach sophomore year.

I tried to convice dining services half way though the first semester that I was converting and needed to eat at the kosher section of the Barnard dining hall but they wouldn't believe me.

UFM isnt there anymore but there is some other market there in the same spot, Morton Williams I believe. Mama Joy's is also now a more upscale deli. They don't sell kegs like Mama Joy's did, though they do still sell 40s of Crazy Horse. West Side Market moved further down Broadway but definitely out of the Columbia bubble. There is are two asian groceries in the neighborhood now (Jas Mart and M2M).

The thing that shocked me though was the fact that so many students didn't seem to mind the food and ate there every day. ::shudder::

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Thank you for blogging. It promises to be a fun read.

I only know this recipe for dulce de leche, have you a different one?

      Poke hole in can of sweetened condensed milk (scm)

      Bake at 200F for 24 hours.

I've never tried to make it before, but  bought the ingredient yesterday with that in mind, so was delighted to see your mention of making it.

I've noticed some brands scm are thicker than others, and I'd think thicker would be an advantage. Anyone know for sure?

Thanks for reading KA.

I take a can of sweetened condensed milk and just boil it at a simmer for about 3 or 4 hours. I usually just put it on the stove before starting to cook and forget about it till after dinner. I can't say I've noticed a difference between brands. Last time I think I used Eagle Brand, but I've used Carnation (aka Nestlé) in the past as well.

Looks like I'll have to try boiling a few different brands for different amounts of time. Anything I'll try just about anything in the name of science.

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But Don, I don't seem to recall seeing a hole in the can when you opened up the dulce de leche.  Was there one?  I always thought that it was the pressure of the can that helped the magic happen.

The hole I imagine is for if you're baking it and are afraid it will get hot enough to burst. You definitely wouldn't want to put a hole in it if you're going to submerge it in water. But that seems to me like a legitimate concern if only for the potential cleaning effort involved should things go wrong. Imagine a hot oven covered with partially cook scm vs a pot of water full of scm.

I've only boiled unpunctured cans, there may be better methods and I'd be up for trying them if anyone knows of one. In theory I suppose that the pressure could help but I doubt I'm getting the can hot enough to make a difference. In a pressure cooker you achieve higher temperatures because as the liquid inside steams the pressure inside increases. But since I'm only simmering the can I don't think it's getting so hot that any steam would be generated inside.

The best dulce de leche I ever had was in Mexico and the only information we could get out of the waiter was that it was made from goats milk. Anyone ever see a can of sweetened condensed goat milk (scgm)?

edited to add: If you were to simmer scm in a pot some of it would evaporate over 4 hours so in that sense I guess the pressure is helping. Even so I still think it's negligible much like atmospheric pressure for most people (unless you're a Sherpa).

Edited by donbert (log)
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Sounds like it may have been Cajeta.

Recipe here.

It was cajeta. I've always though that to be a blanket term for dulce de leche in Mexico though and that in the US we use "dulce de leche" because it was more PC. ("Cajeta" means something very different in Argentina .)

Now I have to go find some goats milk to compare.

edit: caps and grammar

Edited by donbert (log)
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Sounds like it may have been Cajeta.

Recipe here.

This recipe from Rick Bayless works very well. I've made it for myself and as gifts. The goat milk (regular, not condensed) gives it an interesting flavor.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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donbert, great blog so far. differences in thickness of dulce de leche are probably mostly related to how long it cooks. color will also be an indicator. i.e. darker=thicker, lighter=thinner. no need to punch holes in can. your method is the easiest and best. you can cook multiple cans of the stuff and just keep it in your pantry (labeled of course, so you remember what's in them) at room temp. that's fine.

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The dough from this morning is in the oven and I'm going to be making a very simple dinner for myself tonight.

On my way home from Pegu I went through 3 grocery stores and 6 bodegas to amass the following:

gallery_28661_3975_38022.jpg

8 different kinds of sweetened condensed milk and 2 quarts of goats milk. Who knew there were so many different brands of scm?

With three cans of each brand I'll randomly number the cans and boil each brand for 4, 12, and 24 hours with the label removed. Then later this week I'll have someone else open and label the cans with letters for a double blind tasting. Any suggestions for what to taste the dulce de leche on?

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The dough from this morning is in the oven and I'm going to be making a very simple dinner for myself tonight.

On my way home from Pegu I went through 3 grocery stores and 6 bodegas to amass the following:

gallery_28661_3975_38022.jpg

8 different kinds of sweetened condensed milk and 2 quarts of goats milk. Who knew there were so many different brands of scm?

With three cans of each brand I'll randomly number the cans and boil each brand for 4, 12, and 24 hours with the label removed. Then later this week I'll have someone else open and label the cans with letters for a double blind tasting. Any suggestions for what to taste the dulce de leche on?

This is what happens when you go shopping after pegu.

A man with a mission.

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

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I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Any suggestions for what to taste the dulce de leche on?

:laugh: What blog devotion!

I remember Martha Stewart saying something about eating a whole can.. with a spoon. Why mess with perfection?

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The dough from this morning is in the oven and I'm going to be making a very simple dinner for myself tonight.

On my way home from Pegu I went through 3 grocery stores and 6 bodegas to amass the following:

gallery_28661_3975_38022.jpg

8 different kinds of sweetened condensed milk and 2 quarts of goats milk. Who knew there were so many different brands of scm?

With three cans of each brand I'll randomly number the cans and boil each brand for 4, 12, and 24 hours with the label removed. Then later this week I'll have someone else open and label the cans with letters for a double blind tasting. Any suggestions for what to taste the dulce de leche on?

Wow. That's going to be a SERIOUS sugar high...you may want some insulin on hand...

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The dough from this morning is in the oven and I'm going to be making a very simple dinner for myself tonight.

On my way home from Pegu I went through 3 grocery stores and 6 bodegas to amass the following:

[...]

Any suggestions for what to taste the dulce de leche on?

I would think that dinner before Pegu would be wiser!

That's a lot of SCM. Uh, I guess, you're lucky you didn't walk by Vietnamese or other Asian markets, or you would have had at least several other brands to try.

The first thing that pops into my mind is something like the Barbary Coast Cocktail. Scotch seems like it would be a particularly nice pairing. Either that or just vanilla ice cream.

Good luck, man!

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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[...]Breakfast this morning is a cider donut from the farmer's market, toasted with a teaspoon of dulce de leche.

gallery_28661_3975_2681.jpg

I made the dulce de leche last week to use it in egg nog this week but it's so good that I've just been putting it on everything. I'll have to make some more tonight.

Yum!!

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I am loving your blog so far and the SCM experiment is sure is going to be interesting! Can I say though, anyone wanting to boil cans of SCM must ensure that they are ALWAYS covered with water. I have seen firsthand the results of not doing this. Not a pretty sight, trust me. And hours of cleaning walls and ceiling were involved.

No fun at all. Once again....trust me. :biggrin: ( was a friend who buggered up, but I mucked in with the cleaning!)

We are fortunate in New Zealand to be able to buy caramelised SCM in cans nowadays and I most often use it for Banoffi Pies, Cheesecakes, Millionaires Shortbread and Icecream topping. Sometimes I do a MS and can be found hiding away with a can and a teaspoon. :wink:

Lyn

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[...]I got the Double Soul Food Mix which is Bratwurst and Berliner Currywurst with red cabbage, sauerkraut, onions, german fries and a roll.

gallery_28661_3975_97820.jpg

Looks good. How much did that cost?

I walked past the street sign in your first post today, on my way to Skyway after work. I had some Ipoh Bean Sprouts (lame today -- not enough soy sauce or pepper, and the sprouts were a little old) and Curry Mee with Yong Tau Fu (very good, and fans of hot pepper should try the long hot green pepper stuffed with fish -- that stuff is really hot!).

When you're not going for a liquid meal or cooking at home (do you do that much?), where have you been eating out in your hood lately?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Dinner tonight was arugula salad and a mustard crouton frittata.

gallery_28661_3975_6687.jpg

gallery_28661_3975_24815.jpggallery_28661_3975_2840.jpg

Also I have say that if you haven't tried the no-knead bread you you really have to.

gallery_28661_3975_18051.jpggallery_28661_3975_20051.jpg

It really is as simple and as good as they make it look in the article and video.

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I am loving your blog so far and the SCM experiment is sure is going to be interesting! Can I say though, anyone wanting to boil cans of SCM must ensure that they are ALWAYS covered with water. I have seen firsthand the results of not doing this. Not a pretty sight, trust me. And hours of cleaning walls and ceiling were involved.

No fun at all. Once again....trust me. :biggrin: ( was a friend who buggered up, but I mucked in with the cleaning!)

We are fortunate in New Zealand to be able to buy caramelised SCM in cans nowadays and I most often use it for Banoffi Pies, Cheesecakes, Millionaires Shortbread and Icecream topping. Sometimes I do a MS and can be found hiding away with a can and a teaspoon. :wink:

Lyn

Did your friend boil all the water off leaving the can to heat directly or did it explode even when partially submerged??

All 28 cans fit in my big stock pot but I'm definitely going to break it up into two pots to make sure there will be enough water to cover. Thanks for the tip!

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OMG!!! I cant imagine the mess with 28 cans exploding!! Pray loudly. :biggrin:

The can that exploded was partially submerged so it is imperative that you keep the boiling water topped up. There should not be a problem if you are vigilant.

Someone upthread asked about poking a hole in the can and the answer is a resounding NO. The last thing you want are any puncture wounds at all.

I remember years ago when I was on night duty nursing, we would boil cans of SCM in the ward sterilizers. Im surprised I still have my own teeth. :wacko:

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