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About Jose Andres

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<img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1161300941/gallery_6393_3739_12016.jpg" hspace="8" align="left" width="213">About Jose Andres

Throughout his career, Jose’s vision and imaginative creations have drawn the praise of the public, the press and his peers. José has received awards and recognition from Food Arts, Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Saveur, the James Beard Foundation, Wine Spectator, and Wine Advocate. In addition, José has been featured in leading food magazines such as Gourmet as well as the New York Times, the Washington Post, Good Morning America, Fox Sunday Morning News with Chris Wallace, the Food Network, and USA Today.

Widely acknowledged as the premiere Spanish chef cooking in America, José is a developer and Conference Chairman for the upcoming Worlds of Flavor Conference on Spain and the World Table at The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, November 2 – 5, 2006.

<img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1160963336/gallery_6393_3739_12264.jpg" hspace="8" align="right" width="213">In 1993, Jose moved to Washington, DC, to head the kitchen at Jaleo. From there, Jose took on executive chef responsibilities at neighboring Café Atlantico and later Zaytinya. In July of 2003, Jose embarked on his most adventurous project to date with the opening of the minibar by jose andres at Cafe Atlantico. A six-seat restaurant within a restaurant, minibar by jose andres continues to attract international attention with its innovative tasting menu. In the fall of 2004, Jose opened a third Jaleo and Oyamel, an authentic Mexican small plates restaurant and launched the THINKfoodTANK, an institution devoted to the research and development of ideas about food, all with a view toward their practical applications in the kitchen.

<img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1160963336/gallery_6393_3739_10050.jpg" hspace="8" align="left" width="213">Every week, millions of Spaniards invite Jose into their home where he is the host and producer of “Vamos a cocinar”, a food program on Television Española (TVE), Spanish national television. The program airs in the United States and Latin America on TVE Internacional.

Jose released his first cookbook this year, first published in English, Tapas: A Taste of Spain in America (published in the United States by Clarkson Potter) and shortly after in Spanish, Los fogones de José Andrés (published by Planeta). The book is an homage to Spanish cooking and to tapas, one of Spain's gifts to the world of good cooking.

Jose Andres is passionate, intelligent, dedicated, witty and a fan of FC Barcelona.

Jose has been a member of the eGullet Society since 2004.

More on Jose Andres in the eG Forums:

Cooking with "Tapas" by Jose Andres

Vamos a Cocinar - cooking show with Jose Andres

Jaleo

José Andrés' Minibar

Zaytinya

Oyamel Cocina Mexicana, Crystal City

Cafe Atlantico

Jose Andres recipes from Tapas in RecipeGullet:

Potatoes Rioja-Style with Chorizo (Patatas a la Riojana)

Moorish-Style Chickpea and Spinach Stew

Squid with Caramelized Onions

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