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Bundt pan


Desiderio
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I bought my first bundt pan las night and I used for the chocolate stout cake, wich by the way its a bomb!!!Now I am not very familiar with this type of mold so i stupidly spray it and then floured it >now it did came out ok but now my cake surface its pretty ugly with cooled butter ,I just feel dumb for have done that just ruin a perfect cake :angry:

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What is the right way to deal with this type of mold , buttering flouring technique?

Its a 12 cup nordicware by the way.

Thank you so much and sorry if there is another thread ( I doubt it :raz: )

Vanessa

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vanessa,

is your bundt pan coated with teflon or another non-stick coating already? if so, you might not need to do the butter/flour thing. i've never seen that before.

but it is beautiful regardless!!!

edited to add: i just noticed the pan sitting behind the cake in the picture. i guess it isn't coated. but it is white, which i've never seen before...don't know if that affects the cake or not. wait to see if someone else who has a similar one replies :blink:

Edited by alanamoana (log)
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I grease pans that need it with a thin coat of butter or shortening (I rub it on with a paper towel). Then I dust with flour for yellow/white cakes or cocoa powder for chocolate cakes, and I make sure I bang the flour out of the pan so it is a thin coating.

From the picture it looks like yours was just too thick. Mine is almost transparent.

Also, I've seen those pans in the store (haven't used them) and they are non-stick. While you may still need to grease it, using a spray won't work -- the spray beads up giving you areas where the flour will stick and bare areas -- thus the freckled look. I gave up on sprays.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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I never use butter to grease my pans anymore. Butter can cause the outsides of the cake to actually stick to the pan, due to its water content and/or cause burning/dark browning. Pan spray with flour is what I use mostly or I create my own by;

1 cup flour

1 cup solid vegetable shortening

1 cup vegetable oil

Combine well and use a pastry brush to apply.

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I use Bak-Klene or Vegelene and never have any problems.

Bak-Klene

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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vanessa,

is your bundt pan coated with teflon or another non-stick coating already?  if so, you might not need to do the butter/flour thing.  i've never seen that before.

but it is beautiful regardless!!!

edited to add: i just noticed the pan sitting behind the cake in the picture.  i guess it isn't coated.  but it is white, which i've never seen before...don't know if that affects the cake or not.  wait to see if someone else who has a similar one replies  :blink:

You know it actually says that is a non stick pan, so maybe I should just butter it very thin with a brush or so?Aghh then I thought I had something written about bundt pan and chocolate cakes, and ofcourse its on the chocolate sour cream bundt cake recipe, its says how to treat it with a paste of cocoa powder and butter and brush like you guys said , arghhhhhhhhhhhhh hehe oh well , sometimes I am so eger to do something that I forget the logic part and I end up messing sometng , need to have more patient yup yup :laugh:

Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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I use the Bak-Klene on my vintage and antique waffle irons. If it will keep stuff from sticking on those, it will keep anything from sticking.

I have several of the very intricate Bundt pans and have had no problems with the cakes coming out completely intact. I have all of the NordicWare Bundt pans, including the new Stadium pan but I have yet to use it. I bought the Holiday tree ring last year and used it several times. It makes a lovely presentation, especially when one makes a contrasting cake with the Christmas Wreath pan.

You can spray with the Bak-Klene or Vegelene and dust with cocoa powder, however I don't bother and there is no residue on the cakes, I like the way the surface turns out with these products. The most intricate pan is the NordicWare Fairytale pan.

I also have a couple of the Kaisercast Bundt pans, the Domus and the Saphir.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I use Bak-Klene or Vegelene and never have any problems.

Bak-Klene

Most of the consumer-type non-stick sprays contain something in the propellant that accounts for the sticky buildup over time.

These were developed for commercial bakers. For a long time the only place I could buy them was at Smart & Final in a very large can. Now they are available in smaller sizes. I have a can of Bak-Klene that is 13 oz.

However I still have a 22 oz can of Vegalene. I see it is now available in a 21 oz can and is a different color. My can is plain white with red and gold printing, no graphic.

Vegalene

I have had no problems with build up since I began using the Dawn Power Dissolver on ALL of my pans as soon as I remove the product. I have found that it works even better if sprayed on while the pan is still warm. I rarely have to do more than just rinse it off with hot water and I rarely put them in the dishwasher.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I use Bak-Klene or Vegelene and never have any problems.

Bak-Klene

Most of the consumer-type non-stick sprays contain something in the propellant that accounts for the sticky buildup over time.

These were developed for commercial bakers. For a long time the only place I could buy them was at Smart & Final in a very large can. Now they are available in smaller sizes. I have a can of Bak-Klene that is 13 oz.

However I still have a 22 oz can of Vegalene. I see it is now available in a 21 oz can and is a different color. My can is plain white with red and gold printing, no graphic.

Vegalene

I have had no problems with build up since I began using the Dawn Power Dissolver on ALL of my pans as soon as I remove the product. I have found that it works even better if sprayed on while the pan is still warm. I rarely have to do more than just rinse it off with hot water and I rarely put them in the dishwasher.

Can I use these instead of parchment paper?

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Can I use these instead of parchment paper?

Depending on the type of cakes, I spray the pan, then put down parchment in the bottom, then give the parchment a light spray. Again, never have I ever had a problem with sticking.

A tip that always works for me… I sort of discovered this with my muffin opus. Most recipes say to let the cakes stay in the pan to cool from 5 to 15 minutes, before turning out. I always let them rest 3 minutes, enough to pull away from the sides, then run a knife around the sides, then turn out. More times the most, the knife is not even needed.

During the muffin opus, I learned from author and Chef Madeleine Kamman, muffins that stay in the pan after the first few minutes from the oven begin to stick to the pan and are harder to release. I just applied this to my cakes and works perfectly, at least for me. :biggrin: Plus, they do not continue to cook in a hot pan.

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Way back when I worked in my mother's bakery, and we are talking a long, long time ago, we didn't have time to fool around with gently removing stuff from pans, with a few exceptions.

Muffins were banged out of the pans - ours were baked in pans that had 30 cups and we did not use fluted cups for muffins, only for cupcakes - onto cooling racks (same size as full sheet pans) a few minutes after they came out of the oven.

Whoever was pulling from the oven would slide the pans onto a pan rack, working from top to bottom. The person who was emptying the pans would start working from top to bottom, sliding the cooling rack onto the pan rack, also from top to bottom as they filled up. A cooling rack would hold two pans full of muffins.

The pans were taken to the sink as soon as possible, sprayed with very hot water and each cup was brushed with a round brush, sprayed again and slid upside down onto a pan rack.

As soon as the washing was finished, the pans were re-greased, using a mop and semi-liquid shortening and stacked back onto the ready rack.

When we got new pans, they were always "seasoned" just as you would season a cast iron pan, swabbing the cups with shortening and baking in the oven, empty, often repeating this a couple of times. This gave us a fairly stick-resistant finish. (This was in the mid 1950s, before there was a "non-stick" finish on any bakeware.)

We used pre-cut parchment rounds, squares and rectangles in cake pans, also in tube pans, occasionally a narrow spatula (icing) had to be run around the edges, but usually just banging the sides of the pan at a bit of an angle would free the edges.

When preparing a jelly roll with sponge cake, it was turned out of the sheet pan onto a towel, the parchment was peeled off and the cake flipped back onto another towel (both towels barely damp and warm) spread with the filling and rolled, pulling the towel up to start it.

All this had to be done very quickly before the cake cooled to the point it would stiffen.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Can I use these instead of parchment paper?

Depending on the type of cakes, I spray the pan, then put down parchment in the bottom, then give the parchment a light spray. Again, never have I ever had a problem with sticking.

A tip that always works for me… I sort of discovered this with my muffin opus. Most recipes say to let the cakes stay in the pan to cool from 5 to 15 minutes, before turning out. I always let them rest 3 minutes, enough to pull away from the sides, then run a knife around the sides, then turn out. More times the most, the knife is not even needed.

During the muffin opus, I learned from author and Chef Madeleine Kamman, muffins that stay in the pan after the first few minutes from the oven begin to stick to the pan and are harder to release. I just applied this to my cakes and works perfectly, at least for me. :biggrin: Plus, they do not continue to cook in a hot pan.

Oh fabulous. I'm gonna try that. Thanks.

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